Randy Rogers Band

The Randy Rogers Band built its audience by combining forces: It's a dynamic live act centered around songs that fit the rowdy, party vibe of the concert circuit, but their songs also say something. Their tracks give the listener plenty of reasons to want to down a celebratory brewski. But they also maintain a depth that makes them powerful and provocative even beyond their edgy arrangements and tough-guy sound. All this can be found on their newest album, Burning the Day!

Josh Abbott Band

A mere 57 seconds into the opening track of the Josh Abbott Band's She's Like Texas, you're likely to be hooked. One intro, one verse and one chorus are pretty much all that's required to recognize something special in the Texas-based act.

The winding riffs that open "Road Trippin" have a weighty Southern-rock air about them, though the actual instrumentation-fiddler Preston Wait and guitarist Gabe Hanson breeze through the lines in unison-hints faintly at the western-swing heritage deep in their Texas roots. Bass player Daniel Almodova and drummer Edward Villanueva set a powerful, chugging rhythmic foundation that walks the line between commercial country and raw honky tonks.

And Josh Abbott-the founder, lead singer and chief songwriter for the ensemble-evinces a slight Steve Earle character: breathy, fiery, intense.

Those initial sounds set the tone for She's Like Texas, the sophomore album from the Lonestar State's best-kept secret. The project is deceptively simple in its approach, built around honest songs about real-life emotions with strong harmonies and winsome melodic hooks.

But it's complex in its results. There's a joyfulness in the sonic foundations of "All Of A Sudden," "Brushy Creek" and "If You're Leaving (I'm Coming Too)," an ease in the de-stressing "Hot Water," a philosophical bent in the folksy "End Of A Dirt Road" and a reflective sadness in the closing ballad "Let My Tears Be Still."

There are so many emotions tied into the album that the listener is guaranteed to feel something.

"The most important idea that I write songs with is that they're autobiographical," Abbott says. "Nearly every song I write is a true story of mine, or of someone I know."

That truthfulness breeds passion for the material. And that passion comes through in the performances, both in the recording studio and on stage. It's why the Josh Abbott Band has quickly become a Texas institution, selling out many of its shows in the region-and why its talents can't be confined for long to the Lonestar State.

Texas has its own sound within country, and acts have been able to make a living inside its borders while the rest of the U.S. looked the other way. But the walls that once separated the state's multi-genre sound from country's mainstream dropped for many of its most important acts in the last decade. After more than 15 years as a live Lonestar mainstay, Jack Ingram won the Academy of Country Music's Top New Male Vocalist award in 2008. The rough-and-tumble Randy Rogers Band claimed a pair of Top 10 country albums, Pat Green picked up a trio of Grammy nominations, and the Eli Young Band broke into country's Top 15 singles chart for the first time in 2009.

"Those guys paid their dues by playing a lot of venues where they probably got paid $500 and a case of beer," Abbott notes. "Texas music wasn't really being played on the radio very much. But now because of the hard work of all those guys, over time, it's become kind of its own genre and now all the stations in Texas and Oklahoma play it, and it's been able to create a whole new environment of music for us."

It was that very environment that bred the Josh Abbott Band in the first place. While studying communications and political science at Texas Tech in Lubbock, Abbott and his Phi Delta Theta comrades frequently partied at the Blue Light Live, a downtown club on Buddy Holly Avenue that's been a linchpin for such hard-scrabble acts as Cross Canadian Ragweed, Wade Bowen and Golden Globe nominee Ryan Bingham.

During one Blue Light visit with a couple of friends around 2004, Abbott saw the Randy Rogers Band for the first time. He would never be the same.

"It was packed," he remembers. "I watched them play and how they moved on the stage, how they sang their songs, and how they connected with the audience. I literally looked at my friend-and this is the story she tells to this day to her friends-and I said, 'I think I can do that.' She was like, 'What are you talkin' about ?' I said, 'I think I can be that guy on stage, singing and writing songs that people connect with. I think that I can do that.' She was like, 'Well, go do it.' That night or the next day, I started writing country songs."

After doing a few acoustic open-mic nights at the Blue Light, Abbott and three frat buddies formed a complete band and started playing the club, where they were greeted by a full house their first night. Word spread quickly about the Josh Abbott Band, and soon they were opening shows for the acts they were trying to emulate: Cory Morrow, Pat Green and Robert Earl Keen, among them.

Naturally, the early set lists were dominated by cover songs, but Abbott quickly realized any long-term success required that they establish their identity through original material.

"If we play a bunch of covers, we're gonna impress the crowd, but we're not gonna impress the band," he surmises. "I want other bands to be talking about us, so I just wrote a bunch of originals and we started practicing 'em."

One song in particular, the sexually driven "Taste," motivated Josh Abbott Band fans in a way the group had not anticipated. Recorded cheaply as a demo and posted to the band's MySpace page, "Taste" has since garnered more than two million streams. When local listeners flooded Lubbock radio stations with requests, the station got a copy from Abbott and it won noon-hour listener contests for months on end.

"Being requested over George Strait," Abbott muses, "that's ridiculous!"

Abbott quit his pursuit of a masters degree to devote his time fully to the band. He'd completed his course work and needed only to finish his thesis to wrap up his education. His family and friends thought he was nuts. Abbott, however, needed to commit to the music.

"I took probably 15 courses and averaged around a 3.5 doing it, so it's kinda like if I don't write my thesis, it doesn't mean I didn't get an education," he reflects. "To me, the value of the education is more important than the paper of the degree.

"If I ever decide the music thing's not goin' in the right direction, I can go back to college, but when you have a song that's on the radio and it's hot, you've gotta follow up on it because you may not have that opportunity again."

The band quickly evolved. Fiddler Preston Wait-who trained at South Plains College in Levelland, where the alumni include Lee Ann Womack, Natalie Maines, songwriter-guitarist Jedd Hughes and Ricochet's Heath Wright-was hired to play on the band's first demo and soon joined the lineup permanently. When the original rhythm section dropped out, Wait brought in fellow South Plains students Daniel Almodova and Ed Villanueva, and JAB took on a more aggressive sound.

Drew Womack, formerly with Sons Of The Desert, co-produced the vocals for their first complete album, Scapegoat, in Lubbock. A duet from that release, "Good Night For Dancing," featuring Charla Corn, gave them a second hit in the band's homestate and was one of the Top 15 songs of 2009 on the Texas Music Chart.

For She's Like Texas, Abbott enlisted Eli Young Band associate Erik Herbst to co-produce the album in Denton. The difference is noticeable. The songs and arrangements are more focused, the sounds have more clarity, and there's a smart cohesiveness to the project, even when it veers from its central sound: bringing in Kacey Musgraves for a duet on "Oh, Tonight"; employing Roger Creager and Trent Willmon as guests on "End Of A Dirt Road"; or ending the guitar-centric collection with a piano-based ballad, "Let My Tears Be Still." "All Of A Sudden," released in advance of the album, became a Top 10 hit on the Texas Music Chart.

Abbott wrote the bulk of the songs in April and May 2009, shortly after he'd gone through a rocky period in a relationship. It was personally difficult, but creatively inspiring, and the feelings he encountered during that period were central to She's Like Texas.

Appropriately, he delivers the material in a voice that's both manly and sensitive. He sings about the relationships and small-town lessons in a dusty, masculine tone, but he's deft enough to consider-and understand-a woman's viewpoint.

"In order for the female audience base to really embrace you, you have to do one of two things: you have to either flatter them or empower them," Abbott suggests. "The empowerment comes from other girls, other lead singers such as Miranda Lambert and Carrie Underwood who kind of make girls feel like they're stronger than the man-the if-you-can-do-it-then-I-can-do-it-too kind of songs. I go the other direction, and I try to flatter them. When women come to our shows and they hear the songs, I like to think that they feel like we're kind of makin' 'em feel special."

Abbott doesn't just talk about his concepts; he invests in them. He financed the entire album himself, he's given away thousands of the Brushy Creek EPs, and he's been known to toss freebies-coozies, T-shirts, ball caps, etc.-into the crowd during his shows. He released She's Like Texas on his own Pretty Damn Tough label (the PDT initials mirror the acronym of his Phi Delta Theta roots), and Thirty Tigers-an indie marketing company that's helped build careers and projects for Kathy Mattea, Justin Townes Earle and James McMurtry-supported his belief by signing on.

"The way I see it, it will come back," Abbott says of his investments. "It might be in dollars, it might be in fans' loyalty, it might just be that they remember you for giving them something for nothing. You may not be able to trace the way in which that comes back, but it will."

With She's Like Texas, it's paid off in the form of a sturdy, emotional album that sets up the do-it-yourself Josh Abbott Band as the Lonestar State's next authentic breakout. It might take years to analyze the depth of the sound, but it takes only minutes-maybe just seconds-to recognize the powerful uniqueness it adds to Texas music, and to the whole of country music.

© 2010 Josh Abbott Band

Stoney LaRue

Stoney LaRue didn’t plan to take six years between studio albums, but there was an awful lot of life and music going on. For one of the icons of the Red Dirt Music movement, it was always about the moment that drove him to his next destination.
“I had a fiddle player and people kept telling me, ‘You need to get a band’,” recalls the performer/songwriter. “Live at Billy Bob’s was like jumping straight into the fire: two weeks after putting the band together, we recorded the album, hit the road and did 250 dates a year. We never looked back.”
Not looking back has been an earmark of LaRue’s roots hybrid, a sweeping musical narrative that embraces a man’s yearning, vulnerability, venality and desire. Though not meant to be a “state of the drifter” album, Velvet weighs the cost of being a man who lives by his own code against the reality it creates for others in his wake.
“I’m a big fan of looking up at night to what’s out there– and there are a lot of questions that come along with that,” LaRue confesses. “I’d like to think I understand myself – and the world I live in. I’m a father. I’m a husband. I’m a friend. I’m an asshole sometimes – even though I don’t wanna be. I’m a seeker. I’m a player. Maybe, too, I’m trying to figure out how to share something with people that will draw them deeper into who they are, the way music does for me.
“Music can heal. It can inspire. I know that much. I don’t know if this record will do those things, but I sure hope it might.”
After six years and all that living, Velvet marks a new kind of cohesion for the man who’s built a career on live performances. Working with award-winning producer Frank Liddell (Miranda Lambert, Chris Knight, Lee Ann Womack) and Mike McCarthy (Spoon, Patty Griffin); Velvet was recorded over three years in Nashville, and finds LaRue melting down the playbook and expectations for everyone involved.
“I met Frank through Enzo, my manager, and we spent some time together – and Frank said, ‘I’d like to make a record on you,’ and that was three years ago. I didn’t really know what that meant, but I liked him, and liked what he said about music...”
Liddell enlisted Glenn Worf on bass, Randy Scruggs on acoustic, Glen Duncan on fiddle, Chad Cromwell and Fred Eltringham on drums, Oran Thornton on guitar and Jim Hoke on accordion, steel and flute. Recognizing the power of cohesion for LaRue’s voice, Liddell recorded the sessions with everyone on the floor, letting the musicians bleed into each other’s tracks. “It was Frank’s genius idea to put us ALL in a room together and FEEL the songs be born.”
“Chad Cromwell, who plays drums for Neil Young, said he’d not done anything like this since the ‘70s. All these session players, who do this for a living, really made me feel like this was something special for them,” LaRue explains.In an attempt to draw out the sentiments beneath the surface, Liddell introduced LaRue to several “outsider” songwriters, including Mando Saenz. Saenz was born in San Luis Potosi, Mexico and has lived in North Carolina, California, Oklahoma, Texas and Tennessee. He understands the reality of being a man always en route to somewhere else, the quest that is life. “There’s a real non-pretension to how he writes... He’s a poet, and when we start talking about life, it’s amazing what comes out.
“I think I had blinders on in a lot of ways, and was surprised what was there when the blinders came off. The more I was seeing about what could go into the songs, the more layers kept being revealed.”
Certainly, there is a mystical, cedar’n’sunlight-on-the-dust nature to Velvet. In “The Travelin’ Kind,” LaRue ponders the reality of those who stay in one place versus those who’re born to drift, “The apple don’t fall too far from the tree, but the apple never swam in the deep blue sea/ Maybe you’re just not a lot like me...”
“When we were writing, I wanted to be honest. I think the delivery behind these songs is important. There’s a vulnerability to what you do, and a potential for so much more. Maybe your life is turned upside down, but as a man you can crawl out of it, and as a father, you can take care of your family, try to help find the bigger plan.”
Life isn’t just about contemplation, though. There’s also an edge of lust and danger. As the fiddle-stitched “Sirens” whirls through a brisk core sample of desire and life on the run, LaRue suggests that restless doesn’t always mean comfortable. Nor is it the ultimate end game.
“Velvet’s silky melody and gentle rhythms show the singer self-aware, recognizing that he’s got too many miles behind him to deserve the person he’s singing to, and yet... he wants her to touch his soul, to lighten his life, to make him somehow more.
“I’ve always tried to watch people,” he says. “People’s eyes are the windows to their soul, and when you look – even from the stage – you can tell how they’re doing, what they’re getting from us. It makes me want to stay connected and deliver at the same time. When people hear the songs, you can see it on their face. You can see it, too, still rippling when they’re done listening to a song or leaving a show. It amazes me, really, how a little positive can undo a lot of negativity. It may not be the cure for cancer but my way of trying to help change the world, my palette has been my music”
Velvet paints a picture of what it means to be free but aware, willing but uncertain – and always, always drawn to the light. “I believe in a lot of things: Trust. Friendship. Smiling. The beauty of it all. And hope. Hope is one of the bigger ones...Somewhere out there, it’ll all come together,” Stoney LaRue is sure of it – and it echoes on all 10 tracks.

It’s all in the timing.
As Wade Bowen looks ahead to the full-length release of his major-label debut and his emerging transition from regional success to national prominence, there was one vital dynamic affecting the timing: his fans. Across five independent albums and a decade-plus of touring, Bowen not only amassed a string of regional hits and awards, but also the kind of fan base whose passionate anticipation motivated the timing behind the May 2012 release of The Given, a 10-song collection and his first new music since 2008’s If We Ever Make It Home.

Indeed, in the fourteen years since Bowen launched his career at Stubb’s Barbecue in Lubbock, Texas, he’s risen from collegiate greenhorn to the top of the Texas music and Red Dirt circuit. His colleagues and friends Pat Green, Jack Ingram, Eli Young Band and others had made the major-label leap, helping to take a vibrant regional sound to the rest of America. Now Bowen is poised to bring that Red Dirt and independent spirit to country music at large.

Make no mistake, this collection is a document of artistic evolution. Longtime fans (and there are quite a few of them) will hear the Bowen they’ve known and the next steps on his journey. They’ll get better acquainted with the ballad singer who doesn’t often get a chance to show that side of himself in honky tonks. Newcomers will hear a head-turning country artist with range, road-tested hits and one of the best male voices in the business.

That voice truly jumps out of these tracks. Wade’s baritone is dense and concentrated, with traces of whisky and smoke and an autumnal warmth. Bowen takes command of his songs, cutting over the top of producer Justin Niebank’s sculpted guitar-scapes. The sound is one hundred percent country, rife with pedal steel and vivid emotion, but it’s also music that could easily find a home with fans of Bowen’s rock idols - folks like Bruce Springsteen and Jackson Browne. Take a few passes through this project and you’ll hearing a singer’s singer and a focused songwriter who’s adding layers to his music all the time.

“All this work and the care we’ve taken with this album just fall in the category of trying to get better,” says Bowen. “When it comes to my intent as a musician, I’ve not changed anything since day one. I’ve only tried to mature and tried to get better, and I think this record is representative of that.” On a live circuit where the overwhelming mandate is to stir up a party, Bowen has aimed to leave folks with a memory. As a writer, even one from a state with some tall literary traditions, he’s not trying to earn a PhD in poetry; he’s trying to communicate. “My style,” he says, “is more to try to evoke an emotion. I’m more about trying to leave a mark on people.”

Growing up in Waco, Bowen’s exposure to the music of Texas was limited to whatever made it on FM country radio. George Strait was king. Guy Clark was a name he’d not have recognized before getting to college. But at school, in Lubbock, he discovered the full spectrum of Texas artistry, starting with Robert Earl Keen. “He was a big changing point in my life,” says Wade. “I realized by listening to him that there was way more out there than I ever knew. So I started getting into Guy Clark and other great Texas music. But I was obsessed with Robert Earl. When we started the band we were sort of a Robert Earl cover band.”

That band was called West 84, and they found that with their large posse of friends who’d always show up for a good time, it was easy to land gigs. Bowen meanwhile began to channel a lifelong love of writing into songs, and when college ended he made two major decisions. He took on the role of solo artist, and he moved to Austin. By then, about 2001, fellow Waco native Pat Green had busted out to national prominence and the Texas music phenomenon was the buzz of Nashville. It was part of Wade Bowen’s inspiration to charge ahead.

Try Not To Listen is the album Wade regards as his true debut, the project that kicked off a life and living made of 200-plus nights a year on the road and patient grassroots fan development. Then with Lost Hotel in 2006, things really began to click. The opening track “God Bless This Town” reached No. 1 on the bellwether Texas Music Chart, and over the next six years, he released six more chart-toppers and three additional top fives. He achieved another landmark when he was invited to add his name to the roster of great artists who’ve made a Live At Billy Bob’s CD/DVD combo at the iconic club in Fort Worth. With a decade that good, it was inevitable that Music Row would become interested.

The origins of Bowen’s Nashville record deal can be traced to his music publisher, Sea Gayle Music. It’s where Brad Paisley, Radney Foster, Jerrod Niemann and others do their songwriting, and in 2010, it was the first indie company to be named ASCAP Country Publisher of the Year since 1982. Sea Gayle has a track record of investing in artists and helping them reach their potential, and that’s how they’ve worked with Bowen, ultimately backing this album and introducing its independently made sound to Sony Music Nashville. Step one in that process was to find a producer who could preserve Wade’s vision yet find the sweet spot that would help his music have its best chance at country radio. “Of all the producers we talked to, Justin Niebank was the only one who said, ‘I need to come down and see you live,’” says Bowen. “Well, after 13 years of doing this I’d hope someone would want to see what we do, why we have fans. He totally got it and based the whole sound of this record around that.”

That live immediacy certainly throbs on disc-opener “Saturday Night,” which tracks the internal monologue of a lonesome hombre sitting on his stool, nursing his drink and thinking about “that sad goodbye.” Its chiming descending guitar riff will be the first thing many audiences hear from Wade, his calling card. Also likely to grab listeners early is “Patch Of Bad Weather,” a brisk, rocking take-down of a treacherous lover. It paints dramatic pictures of a stormy Texas landscape and it kicks like a gun. A further highlight is a cover of Guy Clark’s “To Live Is To Fly,” in a duet with the man himself.

Bowen has also taken advantage of his recent songwriting sessions and the comfortable studio environment fostered by Niebank to develop his love of ballad singing and the emotional side of country music. “All That’s Left” brings strings into the mix, and it works. Bowen sounds at home. In “Say Anything,” a guy can’t think of a thing to say to a girl he’s just met except gush on about the one he let get away, so he shuts up and listens. Its chorus will surely make some leading male country singers wish they’d been given a shot at the song. “I love those songs like that. Sad ballads,” says Bowen with an apologetic shrug. “That’s where my passion is. ‘Say Anything’ is one of my favorite tracks on the record.”

So think of The Given as a gift to the fans and a teaser for even better things to come. Wade knows full well how much his fans have given him over the years, and he’s more than happy to plan a long career ahead giving everything he can back.

“This record, like everything in my life, is not necessarily what I planned or even asked for,” says Wade. “But this is, thankfully, what has been given to me. I’m a very lucky and blessed man. And I have The Given to thank for that.”

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Randy Rogers Band with Josh Abbott Band, Stoney LaRue, Wade Bowen

Saturday, February 22 · Doors 8:00 PM / Show 9:00 PM at Marathon Music Works

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