D.I.

Juicehead

JuiceheaD is a three-piece power-punk trio hailing from Chicago, IL. The band consists of Rob Vannice: vocals & guitar, Tommy Kloss: bass and Mike Garelli: drums. Vannice founded the band and serves as the group's songwriter.

JuiceheaD formed in late 2003 forged from the ashes of several local punk bands and fused a unique union of skilled playing and solid song writing. Rob Vannice had been active in the Chicago underground since 2000 in various bands, but found a secret weapon in Tommy Kloss, a classically trained guitarist turned bass player with who he had been honing the JuiceheaD sound. With the addition of Mike Garelli on drums, the three-piece catapulted into ear bleeding abandon and reached the next level. JuiceheaD has toured all across North America including the Misfits Records Fiend Fest tour and several regional and national treks with surf-punk pioneers Agent Orange.

The band was signed when they caught the attention of Misfits Records co-founder/co-owner, producer John Cafiero (Osaka Popstar). Cafiero had their 16 track DIY recording "The Devil Made Me Do It" re-mastered and released worldwide on Misfits Records to critical acclaim and success on the college radio charts. The group went on a national tour with the Misfits, Osaka Popstar, the Adicts, UK Subs and more.

The Bollweevils

Led by the sneering vocals of lead singer Daryl, The Bollweevils are direct inheritors of a Chicago hardcore tradition handed down from acts such as Naked Raygun and The Effigies.

Undisputed as one the finest Chicago punk outfits during the 1990s, The Bollweevils were, and still are, defined by their spirited live performances and a song catalogue that demonstrates both their roots and creative ability as a band.

Known for their connection with fans, The Bollweevils began their recording career on Underdog Records, but soon were noticed by Dr. Strange Records. And shortly thereafter, the band released the punk staple “Stick Your Neck Out,” which featured favorites such as, “Dehumanize,” “Bottomless Pit,” and “John Doe.” The album defined The Bollweevils sound, which is laced with high-paced drumming, aggressive guitar and bass workings, and witty and sometimes tongue-in-cheek lyrics. Because of this, The Bollweevils soon garnered one of the largest local audiences and became one of the preeminent bands during the 1990s Midwest punk scene.
During this time, the band began playing more shows throughout the United States and shared the stage with bands that were both influences and contemporaries, including Naked Raygun, Rancid, AFI, Pegboy, Down By Law and Youth Brigade—many of which who later appeared on the band’s album liner notes.

The Bollweevils' second album, The History of the Bollweevils, Part One, collects previously released material from EPs and compilations. 1995's new studio effort Heavyweight boasted a more mature approach, with increasingly complex arrangements and backing vocals. The album concludes not only with a cover of the Bad Brains' "Pay to Cum," but also a 10-minute-plus, audio tour-diary entry.

And although the band went through several lineup changes, The Bollweevils never lost focus on creating an everlasting effect on the Chicago punk scene. Perhaps, one of the best representations of this is their release “Weevil Live.” To see The Bollweevils live is not only an experience, but an assault on the senses and the album surely captures that spirit. The band gels on stage like very few bands can—with Daryl flying around stage and jumping on the audience, Ken and Bob shredding guitars and the fans just eating it all up.
However, like all good things, things had to come to an end and the band officially disbanded in 1996 when they announced, on the legendary Fireside Bowl stage, that they would be playing their last show. To put it simply, fans were not only stunned, but very disappointed as well. At that time, it appeared that The Bollweevils were destined only to become folklore to a new generation of punks.

But in 2003, The Bollweevils reunited for a one-off sold-out show for WLUW at The Metro with a new drummer, Pete. The show, at that time, was considered as the best Bollweevils’ performance to date and whole new generation of Chicago kids were now even more intrigued by the band.

So when the band officially reunited once again in 2006 which included Naked Raygun, The Blue Meanies and 7Seconds, there was a resounding “Hell Yes” by the punk community because unlike many bands who have come and gone, The Bollweevils’ music is as relevant today as it was when it was first written. In the upcoming months the band plans new releases, more shows and a dedication to its fans that will be rivaled by none.


~ Partly written by Erik Hage, All Music Guide

Hotlips Messiah

HotLips Messiah is Chicago's premier mutant rock band. They have been a fixture on the Chicago punk and mutant rock scene for a decade and played legendary venues such as the Lounge Ax and the Fireside Bowl. Large venues like the Congress Theatre, and dinky little holes in the wall like the Big Horse. They have played with bands as obscure as Phil A. Sheo & the Goods and with bands as huge as the Misfits. With classic original bands like the Avengers and the Germs and with modern inspired schizos the Rotten Fruits, the Urinal Mints and the Functional Blackouts. Musically, they are a tornado of noise, filth and ass-shaking melody and catchiness. Lyrically, they use science fiction and sleaze as a blunt metaphor for the INhuman condition mankind finds itself in today.

$10.00 - $12.00

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