Reggae In The Desert, Sly & Robbie feat Mykal Rose, Don Carlos, Yellowman

Reggae In The Desert

Las Vegas' largest Reggae festival showcasing both the unifying power of Reggae music and the Caribbean lifestyle.

Don Carlos

Don Carlos (born Euvin Spencer) Legendary Reggae Artist was born and raised in one of the most deprived regions of Western Kingston, Jamaica, in a district notoriously known as Waterhouse, which incidentally is also a musical spawning ground for many of Reggae's greatest ever talents, such as King Tubby, Black Uhuru, The Jays, Junior Reid and King Jammy, to name but a few. Don Carlos started his singing career in 1973 as one of the original members of Black Uhuru, alongside other founding members, Garth Dennis who later went on to joining the Wailing Souls, and Derrick Ducky Simpson. As part of the trio, Don sang lead on the highly acclaimed Love Crisis album, for producer Prince Jammy in 1977. This album was later re-released and re-titled as Black Sounds of Freedom. A year after the trio's groundbreaking debut, Don Carlos surprisingly decided to leave Black Uhuru in pursuit of a solo career. Within three years as a solo artist, developing his song writing and grooming his distinctive vocal style, in May 1981 Suffering was released. This strong release took the fraternity by storm, courtesy of a heavy roots and culture flavored showcase for the Negus Roots label. This album was a massive hit in Africa, selling unprecedented units. Unfortunately, the album was bootlegged, and Don never received proper royalties.
At this time, he worked alongside Goldie, his sidekick, co writer, and back up vocalist. Together they built a staunch following through touring the live circuit and releasing consistant albums including Harvest Time, Day to Day Living, Them Never Know A Natty Dread Have Credentials, all three issued in 1982, Spread Out 1982 also otherwise known as Laser Beam to which the majority of tracks in this set have been culled, Never Run Away 1984, Just a Passing Glance 1985 and more recently Seven Days a Week. Don's partner, Gold was tragically shot and crippled, putting him out of the music business.

During the eighties dance hall mania, Don had five top ten hits between 1982 – 1985- Late Night Blues, Nice Time Tonight, Dice Cup, Hog & Goat, I'm Not Getting Crazy and Spread Out. Don is still churning out solid, melodic roots reggae. Other titles in his rich catalogue include Roots and Culture, Raving Tonight, Pure Gold, Spread Out, Plantation, Never Run Away, Slow Down Vol. 3, Rasta Brothers, Prophecy, Firehouse Clash, Deeply Concerned, Ease Up, Lazer Beam, Ras Portraits, Grove w/me, Head to Head, Jah Light, Live in San Francisco (2002), and Special Edition. There's an old saying in the music industry that claims: What goes around, comes back around. In Dons' case, a request for reinstatement to his former role as lead vocalist for a rejuvenated Black Uhuru reunion resulted in another strong Black Uhuru album – Now. 1990 marked the reunion of the original vocal trio with Don, Garth and Duckie. After six years- 1989-1994- and four albums, singing lead for Black Uhuru in the studio, and on the road, Don again went back to his solo career. His other titles with Black Uhuru include Mystical Truths, Iron Storm and Strong. All of these four albums are classics with Don up front on lead vocals.

After the Black Uhuru stretch, Don joined forces with the California based Reggae Angels, who backed him for four years. He then kept some of the core Reggae Angels musicians for his own permanent backing band. He has been touring successfully with this band in Europe, South America, Hawaii, and the western US. Don's popularity has been consistently growing, so he is now one of the most sought after roots reggae artists in the business. Check him out online at www.doncarlosinternational.com or www.doncarlosjamaica.com

Yellowman

Jamaica's first dancehall. superstar, Yellowman ushered in a new era in reggae music following Bob Marley's death. His early-'80s success brought the popularity of toasting -- the reggae equivalent of rapping -- to a whole new level, and helped establish dancehall as the wave of the future
Yellowman was one of the most verbally nimble toasters of his time, with a loose, easy flow, a talent for improvisation, and a definite wit in his wordplay. Plus, all the boasting about his prowess on the mic or in the bedroom had to be over the top to be convincing: true to his stage name, Yellowman was an albino, which carries a tremendous social stigma in Jamaica.

Bouts with cancer pushed him into more thoughtful, socially conscious territory in the '90s, but his initial style remains the most influential, paving the way for countless dancehall toasters to follow.

Yellowman was born Winston Foster in Negril, Jamaica, in 1959 (some accounts say 1956). An early target for abuse because of his albinism, he grew up in an institution in Kingston, with little to keep him company besides music. Influenced by early toasting DJs like U-Roy, he practiced rhyming and got a job with the Gemini Sound System as a substitute DJ. Christening himself Yellowman and dressing in a bright yellow suit, he peppered his lyrics with jokes about his skin color and outlandish tales of his sexual conquests. In 1979, he won a landslide victory at the well-known Tastee Talent Contest, and within months he had become one of Jamaica's top concert draws, thanks to a dynamic, humorous stage show.

Yellowman recorded prolifically in the early '80s, at one point flooding the Jamaican market with more than 40 singles. His first full-length album, Them a Mad Over Me, was recorded for Channel One in 1981 and featured the hit title track and the single "Me Kill Barnie," an answer record to Lone Ranger's hit "Barnabas Collins."

Despite this success, Yellowman didn't truly hit his stride on record until he hooked up with groundbreaking dancehall producer Henry "Junjo" Lawes. The 1982 LP Mister Yellowman kicked off their collaboration; released internationally by Greensleeves, it started to break him in the U.K. and U.S., and is still often acclaimed as his best album. It also launched a series of Jamaican hit singles over the next few years that included including "Yellowman Getting Married" (a rewrite of the My Fair Lady number "I'm Getting Married in the Morning"), "Mr. Chin," "Who Can Make the Dance Ram" (a rewrite of "The Candy Man"), "Zungguzungguguzungguzeng" (sampled by several hip-hop acts), "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly," "Soldier Take Over," "Nobody Move Nobody Get Hurt," and "Wreck a Pum Pum," among others. Many of his recordings during this era featured vocal contributions from fellow DJ/toaster Fathead, whose specialty was punctuating lines with animal noises ("ribbit" and "oink" were his favorites).

After 1983's Zungguzungguguzungguzeng album, Yellowman signed a major-label deal with CBS Records, which encouraged him to maintain the stylistic versatility of his previous work. However, his lone album for the label, 1984's King Yellowman, sported mixed results, attempting everything from slack toasts to R&B and pop-tinged crossover tracks, including covers of "Sea Cruise" and "Take Me Home Country Roads," and the much-maligned fusion attempt "Disco Reggae." He subsequently released several albums on Shanachie, including 1984's Nobody Move Nobody Get Hurt, 1985's Galong Galong Galong, 1986's Going to the Chapel, and 1987's Don't Burn It Down. The latter found him delving more into social consciousness; the title cut was a pro-marijuana protest, while "Stop Beat Woman" condemned domestic violence, and "Free Africa" criticized apartheid. Around the same time, he suffered a bout with throat cancer, but fortunately recovered. He returned to action with the hit Fats Domino cover "Blueberry Hill," and moved to the Ras label to record the well-received Yellow Like Cheese album with producer Philip "Fatis" Burrell.

1994's Prayer album (still on Ras) was the first effort in this new direction, and it was followed quickly by Message to the World in 1995. 1997's Freedom of Speech continued in a similar vein, after which Yellowman switched over to the Artists Only label. His first effort was 1999's Yellow Fever, which concentrated on conscious reggae but also featured some good-natured party tracks. New York followed in 2003, and Round 1 in 2005.

Alborosie

Italian singer and producer. Relocated to Jamaica in 2000.

Jesse Royal

born 29.4.1989

ST1

ST1 was formed in 2010, and has been bringing the islands to Las Vegas ever since. With a diverse musical background, ST1 brings you an authentic, polished reggae sound.

$19.99-$54.99

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