Greensky Bluegrass

Five-piece American bluegrass/rock band founded in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 2000. The band is known for their improvisation, multiple-set shows, and open audience recording policy (akin to Phish and The Grateful Dead) and have broken through to a multi-genre fanbase by covering songs from Bruce Springsteen, Aerosmith, John Hartford, Dawes, Phish, The Grateful Dead, Rolling Stones, Prince and more.

Greensky Bluegrass fans are known as 'Campers'.

Donna The Buffalo

Dance in the Street, their first new album in five years, captures the dynamic energy that has earned the band the love and respect of their fans, “the Herd”, for thirty years.

Donna The Buffalo is well known for their lyrics about human potential and community. Throughout Dance in the Street, Jeb Puryear and Tara Nevins, the band’s co-founders, share songs of social commentary and self empowerment. “We feel the album provides an enjoyable ride between the general and the personal, from both male and female perspectives,” says Puryear.

Puryear took it upon himself to write a topical song after a friend slyly commented, “We could use some songs like you used to write.” That off-handed remark led directly to “Dance in the Street,” which falls somewhere between Bob Dylan and Bob Marley, with lyrics:



For change of rule, we had better stand,

Before there’s nowhere left to land,

Doomed to histories repeat,

It’s time to dance in the street.



Nevins adapted the imagery in the lyrics from “Dance in the Street” to create the globally-inspired album cover.

“My songs on this record are about letting go,” says Nevins. “Whether it be the attachment of love lost, the past, or the particular blue funk you’re coming out of.”

Robbie Fulks & Linda Gail Lewis

Wild! Wild! Wild!, the new collaboration between Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Robbie Fulks and rock-and-roll royalty Linda Gail Lewis, gleefully lives up to its title. It’s Americana music that’s as butt-shakin’ as Beale Street, deep-rooted as the Grand Ole Opry, and hip as a trip to The Strip. Subversive as it is reverential, the album jumps the genre tracks of nitty-gritty rock-and-roll, country-and-western, rockabilly, jump swing, and gospel, landing in a strange slice of spacetime—call it 1954—when all these were One (and Linda was 7).
Robbie Fulks, the record’s producer, is “one of the most observant and wry songwriters of the past two decades” (Rolling Stone). Ground-zero Louisiana-born rocker Linda Gail Lewis is the younger sister and frequent performing partner of Jerry Lee Lewis, whose piano innovations she carries forward. Her present-at-the-creation cred buoys the record while Robbie—who sings, plays, leads the band, writes most of the songs, and arranges the others—provides an anchoring sensibility, one that savors old sounds but sidesteps nostalgia. Their two talents have fashioned a record that’s urgent, honest, and fun. Remember fun?

Andrew Adkins

Some people become musicians because they are eager to be something rather than to say something- Andrew Adkins is the latter of those two. Drawing his musical inspiration from the rolling hills of West Virginia where he was born and raised, Andrew yields a passion, yet simple sensibility, that is synonymous with his surroundings and the characters that fill his songs. “It’s one thing to be a writer, it’s another to have to write”, says Adkins. After listening to his most current solo project, The Long Way to Leaving, one begins to understand that sentiment.

There is distant longing and loneliness in his voice, but his words evoke a sense of belonging, one that makes you feel as if you are not alone in the world. There are few songwriters today that can convey this type of emotional response and Adkins, is one of them. You can’t put your finger on it really; he has the heartfelt humbleness of John Prine, the stark, colorful contrasts of Guy Clark and the dry sarcasm and wit of fellow West Virginian, Tim O’Brien. He draws you into his world with his lyrics and carefully crafts you into his stories with his subtle melodies.

After spending the last seven years leading the successful Appalachian Stompgrass band, The Wild Rumpus, Adkins is venturing out on his own wild solo adventure. If you happen to be in the area where Adkins is playing, I would suggest going to hear him play. You will leave the better for it. I know I did.

$15.00 - $20.00

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State Capitol Grounds - Greenbrier & Washington Streets Charleston, WV

Doors 6:30pm Show 7pm

 

All Tickets General Admission

Advance Tickets: $20

Day of Show: $30

Mountain Stage Members: $15

Available online to Mountain Stage Members Friday, Nov. 2 at 10a.m. EST.

On sale via all outlets Friday, November 9 at 10a.m. EST.

 

Available online, by phone at 877.987.6487 or locally at Taylor Books downtown, Charleston.

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