Eliza Rickman and Jill Tracy: One Night with Two Dark Enchantresses (($15 before/$20 day of show))

There is always a hint of menace and reservoirs of force haunting the corners of Eliza Rickman’s voice, whatever register it occupies. Her presence on stage- whether she wears flowers in her hair, or stuffed birds; whether she plays a toy piano or a grand piano- is an enveloping, soft darkness, impossible to ignore. It has been three years between Rickman's first album, O, You Sinners, and her newest effort, Footnotes for the Spring. In those intervening three years, Rickman added the autoharp to her repertoire, fought illness and heartbreak (and won), and turned 30. But mostly, she toured. She is a frequent featured musical act for the live rendition of the popular podcast Welcome to Night Vale, she joined the band Rasputina for a handful of dates, and she organized her own successful solo European tour.

During those three years, Rickman’s vocal delivery has also developed a new breathlessness. She wrote all the string arrangements on her debut. But friend Jason Webley produced and orchestrated Footnotes. Here, Rickman’s voice casts its shadow against Webley’s shimmering strings and a Phil Spector style wall of sound, flecked with melancholy and nostalgia. This clutch of songs comprises, among others, “Lark of my Heart”, written to commemorate the wedding day of Margaret Rucker, an unknown poet whose scrapbook was found in a dumpster many years after her death; “Now and Then”, whose opening lines encapsulate the juxtaposition at the heart of the album- Oh, to be young again/blood is on my hands- and “Wax Nostalgic”, whose title speaks for itself. But this is nostalgia without sentimentality. Rickman’s voice has the power to hold the smallest grain of sadness, an intimation that the longed-for innocence depicted in her lyrics has slipped just below the glow of the orchestra and out of sight.

Jill Tracy is a San Francisco-based singer/pianist, storyteller, and “sonic archeologist” who has garnered multiple awards and a passionate following for her beautifully haunting, cinematic music, sophisticated lyrics, old-world glamour—and curious passion for strange tales.

Hailed a “femme fatale for the thinking man” by the San Francisco Chronicle, Jill Tracy was described by NPR’s All Things Considered as “utterly intriguing, transporting you into a magical world solely of her creation.” LA Weekly has deemed her “the cult darling of the Underworld.”

Her music has appeared on film and television, including Showtime’s Dexter, CBS hit Navy NCIS, and the motion picture Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. She has collaborated and performed with music legends such as Steven Severin (Siouxsie and the Banshees,) David J (Bauhaus,) Jello Biafra, and famed author Lemony Snicket.

With her affinity for odd history tales and unexpected inspirations, Jill Tracy is known for traveling to unusual locales to research and compose spontaneous music. She has conjured music in decrepit gardens, cemeteries, murderous mansions, abandoned asylums, ancient redwoods, and haunted castles.

Jill Tracy is the first musician in history to receive a grant from the renowned Mütter Museum of medical oddities in Philadelphia. She spent nights alone composing music amidst the Mütter’s vast collection of skeletons and specimens—which include renowned “Siamese Twins” Chang and Eng, Einstein’s brain, Harry Eastlack “The Ossified Man,” and The Mermaid Baby.

She was invited by San Francisco’s Presidio Trust to research its archives and tour abandoned buildings with old records of supernatural occurrence. She interviewed over 50 Presidio employees revealing their first-hand ghostly encounters spanning decades. This became her stage show “Legends of the Presidio Ghosts,” which premiered in the famed Presidio Officers Club Ballroom, featuring music composed on-site inspired her discoveries.

She is currently in the middle of an another unprecedented project—a musical excavation of mysterious Lily Dale, the famed private town of mediums and Spiritualists in upstate New York. She is recording her singular piano music channeled at night inside the original 1883 auditorium, site of séances and spirit communication services for over a century. She has captured field recordings from the mystical Leolyn Woods to chilling nighttime rainstorms to create an authentic, never-before-heard sonic journey into this strange, little town that talks to the dead…

$15.00 - $20.00

Tickets

$15 before and $20 day of show online and at the door.

Private Parlor Shows are open to all friends and fans of The Lost Church and the performers.

Seating is first come, first served. We recommend you buy in advance to ensure being a part of the event (parlor shows often sell out), but you can also try purchasing at the door on the night of the show.

Online sales are active until 9:30pm the night of show (unless sold out). You can purchase tickets right at the door using a card via your phone and the above Ticketfly.com link. Old-fashioned cash is also accepted.

Ages 10 and over are welcome. (Parental discretion is advised for some events).

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