Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams

Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams

Multi-instrumentalist-singer-songwriter Larry Campbell and singer-guitarist Teresa Williams’ acclaimed eponymous 2015 debut, released after seven years of playing in Levon Helm’s band – and frequent guesting with Phil Lesh, Little Feat, Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady, brought to the stage the crackling creative energy of a decades-long offstage union. A whirlwind of touring and promo followed, and when the dust cleared, the duo was ready to do it all again. Which brings us to Contraband Love, a riskier slice of Americana.

Larry, who produced Contraband Love, says, “I wanted this record to be a progression, bigger than the first one. That’s all I knew. I wanted the songwriting to be deeper, the arrangements more interesting, the performances more dynamic. Specifically how to get there, I didn’t know. I did know the songs were different. The subject matter was darker than anything else I’ve written.”

“More painful!” Teresa says, and laughs.

“Yeah,” Larry says with a smile. “I’m proud of our debut, but I felt like the songs were lighter than what I’m capable of doing. As a songwriter, I aspire to a sense of uniqueness: this is a great song and it could only have been written by me. I want to get there. It’s a journey, a goal, a pursuit. The mechanics of that pursuit are figuring out what you need to do to surpass your last body of work.”

Although it was not his conscious intent, three of the eight tunes Campbell penned for Contraband Love deal either obliquely or directly with various emotions surrounding addiction. For the blues rocking “Three Days in A Row,” he authoritatively delves into the crucial first seventy-two hours directly following an addict going cold turkey in an effort to get clean. “I was thinking about the things I’ve quit in my life,” he says. “The last time was cigarettes. I remembered the dreams I had in withdrawal.” Vintage-sounding country nugget “Save Me from Myself” (featuring Little Feat’s Bill Payne on piano) explores a troubled soul’s heartrending knowledge that they are hard to love. “I’ve certainly felt both sides of that situation,” Larry says, “and observed it many times.” Delicate waltz “Contraband Love,” a captivating vocal showcase for Teresa, takes on the other side of the story, when a parent (or spouse, or friend, etc.) realizes their only recourse for dealing with an addict is merely to stand “with arms wide open.” Of this remarkable piece, Larry says, “That melody would not leave me alone. It’s one of the more unique songs I’ve ever written.”

“Larry’s writing this stuff,” Teresa says, “and we’re naming off all the people in our lives who are currently going through this (addiction and loss) with a loved one, not to mention the family members and friends we’ve lost in the past from this affliction. That may have driven him. One of my oldest, most intimate friends – a functioning substance abuser since he was a teenager – died on the street in New York while we were in the studio. We dedicated the album to him.”

“The stuff of loss resonates,” Larry says.

Musically, Contraband Love revisits the Americana textures of the duo’s debut, deftly channeling Memphis, Chicago, the Delta, and Appalachia with equal assurance. Larry’s world-famous guitar work – scorching here, funky there, stellar always – punctuates the proceedings with riveting emotion, often like a third voice weighing in on a myriad of emotional states.

The barnburner leadoff single, “Hit and Run Driver,” is a harrowing-but-rocking survivor’s tale, showcasing longtime drummer and engineer/mixer Justin Guip.

To leaven out the darker tunes, Larry and Teresa added a recording of the reassuring Carl Perkins country classic “Turn Around,” with old friend and mentor Levon Helm, captured on drums shortly before his passing. Jaunty folk blues “My Sweetie Went Away,” features new bass player Jesse Murphy doubling on tuba for a distinctly New Orleans feel; traditional gutbucket country blues “Delta Slide,” is spiced with irresistible, harmonized yodeling.

“Stylistically, there’s a lot of different things going on,” Larry says. “So the sequencing was difficult. But I think I got it right.”

Indeed. Contraband Love stands as a new, bolder chapter in a story that arose triumphantly joyous from loss. “When Levon died,” Teresa says, “that put Larry into high gear. He’d already had his head set about making a record, but then it felt like a train took off! We just said, ‘life is short.’”

Another motivator for creating Contraband Love was the experience of taking the Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams show out on the road, as a duo, with a band, and opening for Jackson Browne (who loaned them his band). “It felt fabulous and fantastic,” Larry says. “After I met Teresa (in the mid 80s), I’d be out with Bob Dylan [Larry toured with the Nobel laureate for eight years] and something was missing. I gotta gig, and it’s what I always wanted, but it’s not my stuff, and it’s not with the person I want to be with. And then, when we got a taste of being a performing duo at the Rambles with Levon, the idea that we could expand on that was completely alluring.

“So virtually everything we’ve done musically since I left Dylan’s band, we’ve been asked to do together: Levon, Phil and Friends, Jorma and Jack, Little Feat; we’ve done it all as a unit, a duo, and it’s great. It’s rewarding on a lot of levels. The way I see it, when Teresa and I are together, doing our material for people who come to see us, then everything I ever wanted out of life is pretty well complete.”

A long-time fixture of Philadelphia’s bare-knuckled indie rock scene, James Hearne recently packed up his West Philly apartment, taking his wife, his bulldog and his guitar and hitting the road out to the Hudson River Valley in New York - moving into a historic home just spitting distance from the barn where Levon Helm and the Band recorded some of their best work.

Searching for the space to stretch out, a little peace and quiet, and deep inspiration from the woods and streams around Woodstock, Hearne started piecing together a new album that reflected the well-worn path of a true rock journeyman – including endless miles of traveling, loving deeply, fucking up, scraping for dollars and drinking way too many city-wides (not necessarily in that order).

Like Bon Iver finding his voice in the wildwoods of Wisconsin, Hearne crossed the Rip Van Winkle Bridge and drove deep into the Catskills to find his voice, landing in Catskill, NY, where he collaborated with a handful of like-minded musicians (including Eric Parker (Joe Cocker, Steve Winwood), Rob Stein (Mike & Ruthy Band, Amanda Palmer), and Eleanor Kleiner & Elie Brangbour (The Whispering Tree ), as well as a guest spot from legendary bassist Tony Levin) for months on a set of tracks that sound like they come from another time and maybe (just maybe) a slightly better place than the one you’re at right now.

The result is a gorgeous shit-kicker of a new album called “Through Private Wars.”

With deeply soulful steel-sliding barn-burners like “Eight State Arms,” “Two Lanes” and “Strange the Way,” the album announces Hearne as a fully-realized singer-songwriter talent to be reckoned with, and heartfelt tracks like “I’m Afraid of My Heart” will probably end up on the soundtrack of every self-respecting hipster who plans a destination wedding in 2017.

Fans of Jason Isbell’s gut-wrenching, southern-tinged rock will find something they love in Hearne’s powerfully-wrought storytelling and sparse but nimble picking. Those who have embraced the promising modern-meets-classic country spirit of Sturgill Simpson and Lydia Loveless will find a kindred old soul whose work demands repeated listens on long drives.
And those who occasionally find their solace from playing a Ryan Adams album loudly and a working their way through a tumbler of whiskey might just have found their new favorite act.

$40.00 - $45.00

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