LONE STAR JAM 2018 - SUNDAY

LONE STAR JAM 2018

Lone Star Jam, in its 11th year, is the largest Texas Country Music Festival in Central Texas. The event spans 2 days and features 20 of the best Red Dirt and Texas Country Bands.

The Front Row VIP Experience includes:

Private Viewing Area Directly In Front Of Each Stage
Access To VIP Tent
Access to Permanent, Indoor, Air-conditioned Restrooms
Lone Star Jam T-Shirt
Lone Star Jam Koozie
Exclusive Artist Meet And Greets

PRIVATE BAR WITH:

Free Water
Free Sodas

VIP Tent Will Include Tables & Chairs

Randy Rogers Band

Authenticity isn't something that can be manufactured in a studio. It's not a craft that can be learned or artfully practiced. It comes from living life. It's the byproduct of blood, sweat and tears and as the foundation for music, it elevates mere entertainment to compelling art. Every note, every word on the Randy Rogers Band's new album Nothing Shines Like Neon rings with authenticity that makes each song linger with the listener long after the music fades.
"You've just got to be true to yourself and you can't fool anybody," Rogers states matter of factly of the band's philosophy. "As a whole, our body of work is pretty consistent to our live show and the band that plays on the record is the band that you go see."
The same line up has been performing together since 2002 and the music has evolved as they've soaked up life experience. "As men we've all matured and lived a lot of life together," Rogers says. "We've had a few breakups happen to us. We've had babies. We've had life changes. We've been on the road 200 shows a year. I've been in this band 15 years so a lot has changed. I still listen to Merle Haggard every night. I mean that hasn't changed, but a lot has changed for us musically and privately. We all are in a good spot and we all are just as good friends as when we started."
Camaraderie and creativity have made Rogers and bandmates Geoffrey Hill (guitar), Johnny "Chops" Richardson (bass guitar), Brady Black (fiddle), Les Lawless (drums) and Todd Stewart (utility player) one of the top bands on the competitive Texas music scene. Nothing Shines Like Neon continues the momentum established by the band's four previous albums—Randy Rogers Band, Burning the Day, Trouble and Homemade Tamales, each of which went to No. 1 on iTunes. Earlier in 2015, Rogers joined friend Wade Bowen to record the critically acclaimed album Hold My Beer Vol. 1.
Produced by Nashville legend Buddy Cannon (Willie/Merle) at Cedar Creek in Austin, RRB's news album Nothing Shines Like Neon showcases the band's taut musicianship as well as Rogers' earnest vocals and insightful songwriting on such instant classics as the groove laden "Rain and the Radio," the heartbreak anthem "Neon Blues" and the playful "Actin' Crazy," a duet with Jamey Johnson. "Jamey and I wrote that song together," Rogers notes. "I met a movie star a few days before Jamey and I were going to write. I was in LA playing at the House of Blues and he came out to the show. I was thinking about him …and thinking about being a struggling actor living in LA and having to put up with all the bullshit that LA is. I just wrote that song about him."
The album opens with the fiddle driven shuffle "San Antone". "That is a Keith Gattis song. He wrote by himself. Being from Texas and living so close to San Antonio, I don't think that song is going to hurt me at all," Rogers laughs. "It's one of those songs when I heard it I was like, 'Oh hell! Why didn't I write this song?'"
"Takin' It As It Comes" features Lone Star legend Jerry Jeff Walker. "I've been a big fan of Jerry Jeff's all my life," Rogers says. "He came in the studio with us, got in there with the band, jumped around and played guitar and sang. We had a great time."
"Rain and the Radio" is Rogers' homage to Ronnie Milsap. "I wrote that with Sean McConnell. He and I have written a lot of songs through the years. I've always been a huge Ronnie Milsap fan and to me that song has a little Milsap feel to it, kind of a bluesy country thing, which we haven't done before. Any artist that I look up to always tries to create something different and pushes the envelope a little bit. I think we do with that song in particular. It's very country. It's just very different. As a band, we're trying to broaden our horizons and I don't think that's a bad thing. If we were all just stuck doing the same old thing, we would all be bored. We probably wouldn't still be here. It's just a matter of spreading your wings a little bit."
"Look Out Yonder" is a poignant tune Rogers recorded in honor of his mentor, the late Kent Finlay. "Kent gave me my start in the music business. Up until the day that he died, we talked about songs and about music," Rogers says. "We actually named the record, Nothing Shines Like Neon after a lyric in one of his songs as a tribute to him. Alison Krauss and Dan Tyminski are singing on 'Look Out Yonder', which was written by Earl Bud Lee, who is most famous for writing 'Friends In Low Places'. He and I have been friends for 10 years and he has always wanted me to cut that song. I've never had a record where it fit and just thinking about losing Kent and Kent going to heaven and joining his mom, 'Look out yonder coming down the road' it just fit. I haven't performed that song yet live, but I know I'm going to have a hard time getting through it. The day we started our record, I got a call that Kent passed away so this record is definitely dedicated to Kent. That song makes me think about all of us musicians and how we are crazy as hell and lead the most unorthodox lives. Most of us return back to our roots, so hopefully this is an album that glorifies Kent's life and is also a nod to the traditional sounds that we all grew up loving."
A native of Cleburne, Texas, Rogers grew up addicted to traditional country music. "I wanted to be George Strait when I was in the sixth grade," he says with a smile. "And I grew up listening to Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, I've listened to them more than anybody else, my whole life. I always liked songs. I always wanted to find out who wrote the songs and what the songs were about. I always liked the art and the craft of being a songwriter. My dad's Beatles records got played a lot and Michael Martin Murphy is another one I listened to a lot as a kid. My dad was a huge fan."
Like many artists, Rogers got his start performing in church and then expanded to local venues. "I could write a song when I was pretty little, 11, 12 or 13," he says. "It's like a kid who could do calculus or something. It was just something that clicked in my brain for me. I went and finished college and got a degree in public relations and then started a band."
Since then the Randy Rogers Band has steadily built a following that has spilled beyond their native Texas. For the past 10 years they've recorded for Universal Music Group, but on Nothing Shines Like Neon, Rogers again takes the reins, releasing the album on his own Tommy Jackson Records, named after a song he wrote for their very first album. "It's a very obscure Randy Rogers Band song and to this day there is always this one drunk kid at a show that says, 'Play "Tommy Jackson!" Play "Tommy Jackson!"' It's kind of a running joke within our band. It's like, 'How in the hell did this kid in Iowa City, Iowa remember that stupid song "Tommy Jackson?"' It's about a guy who is on the run from the cops, wanted for murder. It's a story song and we just felt like it was a unique way to name a record label."
Nothing Shines Like Neon is a stellar collection in an already impressive body of recorded material that owes a lot to the band's potent live show. "You come to a show, you know what you're going to get," Rogers says. "We've worked hard at making ourselves better on stage and we care about our live show. It's a way to come out and unwind, and we've stuck to writing songs that are about real life, about breakups or divorces, falling in love or babies being born, and in the case of this record even death, the ups and downs of life. People can relate. That's what country music is supposed to be. Our band has been around for a long time because there's no bullshit to us. We're not in it to be rich and famous. We're in it to make a living, provide for our families and do something that we all love. You can't fool people and we haven't ever tried. I think that's the key."

Casey Donahew Band

William Clark Green

American country music singer from Flint, Texas. He has released four studio albums and one live album.

Parker McCollum

At just 22 years old, Parker McCollum is already earning comparisons to critically acclaimed artists like Ryan Bingham and John Mayer. However, the young singer-songwriter has also worked tirelessly to establish his own name, a fact that is evident on his striking full-length debut album, The Limestone Kid, which will be released on Feb. 24, 2015. The 11-song record (featuring nine originals written by Parker — a writer mature beyond his age — and a guest appearance from steel guitar legend Lloyd Maines) covers an impressive amount of musical ground, from the driving roots rock of "Lucy" to the introspective heartbreak of the album's first single, "Meet You in the Middle." A rising star on the regional music scene, McCollum and his stellar band plan to take their energetic show on tour this year to celebrate the release of The Limestone Kid. For show updates and more: parkermccollum.com

He sings. He writes songs. He plays guitar. And his new recording — an April 2010 EP of cool, crisp country tunes, just like him — as well as forecast releases of four songs or more at a time during the coming 12 months are the foundation of a full-length album he wants his fans to help him choose the tracks on.

The Austin-born Texas artist has been writing since the release of his last album, his second, the irreverent and powerful ANYWHERE IN TEXAS, which featured a dozen songs written and co-written by Park, including "Cold in Colorado," with its killer chorus hook; "Don't Look," which climbed The Texas Music Chart; a co-write with Wade Bowen, "A Woman Like You"; the hard-driving "First Day of Summer"; and the sentimental final cut, "These Days."

The new EP features four tunes in the same vein, universally melodic with bold yet personal lyrics, story-songs that come from the heart, sung in a pure, pitch-perfect yet understated voice that perfectly suits the songs and is easily identifiable on country radio.

With Park in the studio were Karl Schwoch (electric guitar), Will Armstrong (drums, percussion) and Eric Lenington (bass), the quartet starting to come together after December 2006 and a gig at Austin's Broken Spoke opening for Asleep at the Wheel. Since then, they've also performed with or opened for Clint Black, Tracy Lawrence, Mark Chestnutt, Gary Allan, Pat Green, Jack Ingram, Randy Rogers Band and Eli Young Band.

Kevin Fowler

Reflection is the catalyst to coming full circle.

Texas country singer-songwriter Kevin Fowler took a couple of years to take stock of his artistic career, launch his own record label, then write and record How Country Are Ya? the old-fashioned way.

How Country Are Ya? – Fowler's seventh studio album and his first for Kevin Fowler Records in a joint venture with Nashville's Thirty Tigers - is the good- timing, tradition-steeped and honky-tonk-stomping Amarillo native's return to basics effort. A year in the making, the album features 15 fresh tunes (he wrote all of them except for the raucous instrumental "Mousturdonus") and was produced by Ken Tondre, Fowler's drummer, at Tondre's The Compound Recording Studio in Austin.

One of the most potent songs on How Country Are Ya? is "Panhandle Poorboy," a completely autobiographical piece that's clearly the centerpiece of Fowler's mindset during the creation of the disc. Simply put, he wanted to come back home.

"The last couple of records have been on Nashville record labels," Fowler said, referring to 2007's Bring It On, released on Equity Music Group, and 2011's Chippin' Away, released on Average Joe's Entertainment.

"But this one is on my own label with my buddies like we used to make records. I wanted to feel right at home, go back to the well, and not get into any outside influences. I really felt like I wanted to make music closer to all my anthems that people scream along to at shows."

Plus, How Country Are Ya? is chock full of Texas-centric collaborations. Earl Dibbles Jr., the alter-ego of Dallas-bred Granger Smith, provides the disc's no- nonsense intro. Amy Rankin, one half of Austin's The Rankin Twins, croons with Fowler on the emotionally evocative number "Before Somebody Gets Hurt." San Antonio's Grammy winners Los Texmaniacs crank up the South-of-the-border ambiance of "Borracho Grande." Kingwood, Texas' rebel-rouser Davin James lends his big personality to the hilarious "Chicken Wing." And Huntsville, Texas newcomer Cody Johnson stirs straight-up country action on "Guitars and Guns."

See? Told ya Fowler threw a studio party with his good friends and turned it into a record. But of course the first single, "How Country Are Ya?," is quintessential Fowler. The song crackles with all the beer joint energy that characterizes every creative fiber in Kevin Fowler's body.



The point behind each lyric, each guitar lick, and each twanging-rocking melody is the live show. Fowler has earned his reputation as one of the most amped-up concert performers to emerge from the modern day Texas country movement. For those that have experienced Fowler onstage, then you know he brings unbridled musical muscle to the platform. Backed by his trusty band he's a dynamo – cracking jokes, hitting high notes, strumming his guitar and putting each of his fans in two-stepping mode.

"From day one I realized I couldn't control what radio played and what video channels played, but the one thing I could control every night was the live show," Fowler said. "The musicians want to be there, the fans want to be there and I want to be there. People can listen to the CDs at home. But if they come to the shows they are ready to have a good time for an hour-and-a-half, forget about their problems and forget about work on Monday."

Pretty much any city in Texas belongs to Fowler, but he will immediately point out that he is quickly growing in Oklahoma and throughout the Midwest, all the way up to Chicago.

"I get a big kick out of seeing the way it has spread now across the country. It's really cool how we've come so far. I remember a time when Texas country music didn't have as long a reach."

Enter social media. Fowler boasts more than 270,000 Facebook likes and 34,000-plus cool Twitter followers. But, most importantly, the percentage of those people who engage Kevin online is higher than nearly any country artist anywhere. For an independent artist like him, that's crucial to career growth and sustainment. He knows full well that social media puts bodies in concert seats and creates an imperative rapport with his fans. It is the technological age way for artists to connect with admirers.

"Social media is the biggest part," Fowler said. "Social media is king. It has impacted my career as significantly as radio. Twenty years ago the only tool you really had was Kinkos to make flyers. This is the biggest piece of the puzzle especially for us now since we don't have a lot of radio airplay. I can reach my target audience big time now."

But naturally even the fiercest honky-tonker needs a little down time. Or should we say outdoors time? Fowler comes from a long line of hunters and fishermen. And if you ask him how often he gets to the hunting grounds and the fishing hole he quickly replies, "Anytime I can!"

How thick is the hunting and fishing blood coursing through Fowler's veins? You could say it's totally innate.

"I was born in May and in September of that year I went on my first hunting trip. My dad was a huge bowhunter. I still go bowhunting. That is what we did as a family. We also went on fishing trips every spring break. That made me who I am. It was camping in Colorado, bow hunting in the fall and fishing every spring break. Now it's all about the camaraderie of friends, getting away, and the freedom of the outdoors."

"I would have never in a million years thought the Texas music scene would grow to what it is now," a proud Fowler said. "I was lucky enough to have been there since the inception. I feel proud to have played a part in establishing the scene, in making it what it is. We fought a lot of battles and kicked a lot of doors down. We broke those barriers down back then. And now we are having fun spreading it town by town outside of Texas, just the way we did inside the home state."

Reflection brought Kevin Fowler full circle.

Troy Cartwright

American country music singer-songwriter, born 3 April 1990.

$35.00 - $40.00

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For more information on Lone Star Jam 2018, please visit www.lonestarjam.com.

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