Paranoid London

Paranoid London sold more of their debut album than anyone else without any press, reviews or promotional copies given away. They destroyed every party/festival they played this year including Panorama Bar, Sonar By Night, Dekmantel & the Fabric 16th birthday party.

This is the real deal: dirty, repetitive music for DJ’s & dancers.

Many DJs have reputations defined by a certain place and time. Not so for Derek Plaslaiko, whose 20-year career behind the decks has seen him gather a loyal fan base wherever and whenever he may be.

Some will know Derek as a favorite of the mid-90s Detroit warehouse scene, which lead to a personal invite from Carl Craig to appear at the inaugural Detroit Electronic Music Festival in 2000. Others recognize him from his near decade-long residency at The Bunker New York parties, during which time he was named “Best Techno Party DJ” by the Village Voice in 2006. Then there was the summer of 2011 spent behind the decks at Berlin’s infamous Club der Visionaere, as an honorary resident at the weekly Visionquest nights—a worthy introduction to the city he now calls home.

Of late, there is a new generation of party people who will know Plaslaiko from his extended sets (up to 12 hours) in New York, Paris, Seattle, Los Angeles and Philadelphia, or his regular appearances at clubs like Tresor, Hot Mass, Beta, Output, Smart Bar and Berghain, and festivals like Decibel, Communikey and Movement. Or some who caught his name on the flier for the No Way Back series of parties put on by Interdimensional Transmissions, the Detroit imprint that has put out several of Plaslaiko’s rare original releases, along with Perc Trax and Minus.

There are tens of thousands of others who caught on to Plaslaiko following his record-breaking 12-hour Boiler Room set, where he gave viewers a look into his living room, while friends and friend’s toddlers enjoyed the day. This landmark session properly archived the full Plaslaiko musical experience, from flawless house and techno, to hip-hop, classic rock, and whatever other musical moment this life-long record obsessive chooses to share. And let’s not forget the thousands of folks who have befriended Plaslaiko while sharing the dance floor with this committed clubber who refuses to hang out in the booth and will always skip the DJ dinner in favor of catching one of his peers behind the decks.

Wherever one picks up Plaslaiko’s story, maybe during his days dealing discs in Detroit’s famed Record Time dance room or possibly the years spent moving serious weight at Watts and Syntax Distribution, the one constant is top-shelf musical taste, as defined by Plaslaiko’s personal heroes—names like Laurent Garnier, Daniel Bell and Zip, and colleagues including Carlos Souffront, Jason Kendig and Mike Servito—and a passion for music that over-rides the usual trappings of the modern DJ industry.

This may mean to some that Plaslaiko is still unsung. But for those who know better (and there are many all over the world), praise for Derek has been sung for decades.

Alton Miller

Growing up in the 1970s, Miller soaked up the musical environment surrounding him in the Motor City, taking a particular interest in the sounds of Motown, Philadelphia, Parliament-Funkadelic, and Santana. It was during the early '80s once the "dance music crazed" Alton became friends with a young Derrick May that he decided to start spinning records, citing Chicago DJs such as Ron Hardy and Frankie Knuckles as prime influences. By the latter part of the same decade, Miller joined forces with George Baker and Chez Damier to start the Music Institute, a short-lived but legendary Detroit club that has since become near-mythical, thanks to the pioneering techno efforts of figures such as May. Following the demise of The Music Institute, Miller took an interest in Conga drumming in addition to DJing, which led to a period between 1989 and 1991 where he toured the world with his music. He then joined forces once again with May, first as an employee of the artist's Transmat Records label (he also played bongos at Silent Phase's early shows), then as Aphrodisiac, the title under which he would begin releasing his music. Besides his EP on Transmat's sublabel Fragile, he also released his music on Kevin Saunderson's KMS and a series of EPs on Serious Grooves. By the mid to late '90s, he had increased his presence in the Detroit area through a number of DJ performances and a stream of stunning twelves. His debut album for Distance has been highly acclaimed as all things house. His current peacefrog album 'Stories Of Bohemia' is a powerful, moving collection of mature jazz tinged, soulful house grooves with flavors of African and roots music.
Alton Miller is picking up from where he left off in 2015 and rolling in 2016 on mission to make this year one of his most prolific ever. 2015 saw him re-introduce his label InnerMuse Recordings with his own signature sound on Whereabouts Known. During Movement 2016 in Detroit, Alton Miller played with Chez Damier for the first time since the Music Institute closed in 1989, during a party organized by fellow DJ Kai Alce. Alton Miller also inaugurated the new Adeen Record label with a first EP, called “More Positive Things”. He released another EP “The Vault” on Italian DJ Volcov’ record label, Neroli early October 2016.

Founder, DC House Grooves.

Katrina Mir

( Body Werk | DC )

$8.00 - $15.00

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