Life is short, sometimes hard, and hopefully, meaningful. This is a reality that doesn't become obvious until you're reaching a certain point, but in doing so, we as human we are, and what we want from our we are, and what we want from our time on this Earth in the process. On their new album Everybody Is Going to Heaven, Citizen stand on the edge of that overwhelming realization, and shout all of those big, tough existential questions into the clouds without the anticipation to figuring out the definitive answers just yet.

2013's debut album Youth introduced the music world to a group of mid-western indie-punks just getting their feet. After seeing their album chart in the Billboard 200 upon its release, sell more than 20,000 copies to date, and embark on massive tours with sold out headlining shows, the band Citizen is becoming is now more obvious than ever in the way they convey themselves sonically and artistically as individuals with purpose

Recorded with Will Yip at Studio 4, Citizen's second full-length effort presents the most fully realized version of the band to date in spite of it being their most dissonant and chaotic material they have ever written. The marriage of destruction and beauty looms throughout the album from its start to conclusion, with its sequencing mirroring a journey from the cradle to the grave that concludes with the juxtaposition between death and light on" Yellow Love" and "Ring of Chain."

As songwriters, Citizen have adapted highly personal introspection as a means to confront fear, loss and honest revelations into their words. Lead singer Mat Kerekes splits open his head onto the canvas with both distress and violent bliss over heady topics such as a conflicted relationship with a mother on "Dive Into My Sun," to self-criticism of a control complex on "My Favorite Color". Perhaps the most permeating specter throughout the album is the loss of loved ones experienced throughout its members' lives over the past year, as evidenced on "Heaviside" and "Weave Me (Into Yr Sin)". Collectively, members Nick Hamm, Jake Duhaime, Ryland Oehlers and Eric Hamm's contributions to this chaotic life cycle are celebrated through an abrasive atmospheric core that can at times feel unforgiving, while nurturing in others.

Everybody Is Going to Heaven begins with a blank slate, explores its fair share of life's ugly moments and tragedies along the way, but ultimately, leaves this world on its own volition and peace of mind. You could say this represents where Citizen are now: A band who passionately sets out to create their own art, and makes itself clear they have no intention of retracing past steps or mistakes set into the ground by their others, or even themselves. It is their journey alone, and all part of their own distinct unique path that life has waiting for them.

"I don't want to be in an emo band anymore," proclaims SORORITY NOISE frontman Cameron Boucher. "But I have no problem with people calling us that, because in the strictest of senses, we are an emotionally driven band."

That, is Sorority Noise in a nutshell: part of a movement, but also discrete and determined to break free from the pack. Truth be told, the Connecticut-based quartet—Boucher, guitarist/vocalist Adam "Scuff" Ackerman, bassist/vocalist Ryan McKenna and drummer Charlie Singer—have always operated a little differently than most of their peers.

For starters, Boucher attended the University of Hartford for jazz saxophone, while guitarist Ackerman studies acoustics and upright bass. But it's not just their unorthodox musical chops that set the band apart in the underground punk scene. With the release of their Topshelf Records debut, JOY, DEPARTED, Sorority Noise—recently named one of the 100 Bands You Need to Know in 2015 by Alternative Press—are poised to break out in a big way.

Joy, Departed is more than just the best iteration of Sorority Noise to date; the album also marks a creative shift for Boucher, who draws musical influence from a diverse crop of acts spanning Regina Spektor and jazz trumpeter Chet Baker to The Smiths and Broken Social Scene—and previously spent time fronting screamo band Old Gray. In some ways, the singer says he approached the creative process like writing his very first album.

Boucher started Sorority Noise in late 2013 with friends as an outlet to explore musical styles outside his work in Old Gray. The group then recruited Ackerman and issued their debut full-length, Forgettable, in May 2014. Much buzz—and tours with rising stars Modern Baseball and The Hotelier—followed, as did a split 7" with Somos and the arrivals of Singer (whom Boucher had played with in Old Gray) and McKenna.

Outside of pure proficiency, one of the more gripping elements of Sorority Noise's musical direction is the band's willingness to speak of personal hardships, including the often-taboo topic of addiction on songs like the heart-wrenching album-closer "When I See You (Timberwolf)."

"There's so many people having drug problems—and a lot of bands who play it safe and don't want to talk about it," Boucher explains. "I think it's important to be shown in modern music. I like to be honest about my past and talk about things that have had me down. As a lyricist, you are responsible for the people who care about your music."

That's ultimately what makes Joy, Departed such an important album: It's life, warts and all, sung by someone who's been through it firsthand. It's not always rosy, but it's real. Above all, it's an album meant to be experienced as a body of work—not single songs plucked piecemeal or shuffled on a streaming service. And for Boucher, he hopes it will show critics and fans alike Sorority Noise has something to say, something he's willing to say as loudly as they'll let him.

Plastic Cough, the fantastic debut full length from Seattle WA's Great Grandpa, is bursting with grunge and pop sensibilities focused around the legendary indie rock sound that's dominated the Pacific Northwest music scene for the past three decades.

Great Grandpa began in Seattle in 2014 when guitarist & vocalist Patrick Goodwin recruited bassist Carrie Miller, drummer Cam LaFlam, and vocalist Alex Menne to form a humble rock band. Inspired by the pop-sensible alternative rock of the 90's, and offset by a mutual love for noise and math rock, the group set forth to write and record their first EP.

During recording, guitarist Dylan Hanwright joined the group, solidifying the lineup. Great Grandpa began performing in the Seattle area in late 2014, frequenting the city's DIY venues. In March of 2015, their debut EP Can Opener was released on Broken World Media. The EP was met with considerable praise, and has been described as "warm, slightly off-kilter grunge pop", and "knotty, twisted, and warm rock music that's as melodically satisfying as it is, at times, confounding."

Great Grandpa began writing their debut LP soon after, and found themselves touring the western US and performing extensively in the Seattle area. Written in 2015 and 2016, Great Grandpa's debut LP Plastic Cough continues to explore the sonic territory visited in Can Opener, exhibiting infectious melodies across a range of backdrops, from quiet bedroom-pop to explosive, anthemic rock. Plastic Cough is out July 7th via Double Double Whammy.

$17.00 - $20.00

Tickets Available at the Door

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