The Flesh Eaters

Arising from a punk rock party scene that exploded in the wasted midst of Hollywood tinsel and trash, The Flesh Eaters first mutated into a punk-fueled "roots rock voodoo blues" group (marked by the masterful A Minute to Pray, A Second To Die LP and a classic line-up of LA scene heavies) and later into a "speed metal esoterrorica" four-piece who throttled American hardcore with their mix of amped-up guitar hellfire and rough-hewn Jagger/Richards blues. Singer and band constant Chris D. (Desjardins) was able to sprout new heads for his band every couple of years while keeping a supremely intense, performance-as-catharsis ethos very much alive, and always charting fertile new musical ground. Live, Chris D. would shriek like he was conducting the last performance before Satan’s bloody rapture, and as if he just might be taking the audience down with him. The rock pundits of the day thus brought forth much enthusiasm, enthusiasm now all but buried in the yellowing copies of local fanzines.
Formed in 1978 and disbanded in 1983, when Chris D. started a new project, Divine Horsemen; reformed around 1990 and active till 2003-2004.

Tom Heyman

The worlds of indie rock iconoclast John Vanderslice and alt-country godfather Alejandro Escovedo rarely intersect, but in Tom Heyman, they most certainly do. The San Francisco based singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist has toured and recorded with artists of most every stripe, from Chuck Prophet and John Doe to cult favorites Girls and a whole lot more in between.

Heyman recorded his third solo record, That Cool Blue Feeling, in Portland, Oregon with Mike Coykendall (M. Ward) producing and Rusty Miller (Kelley Stoltz, Jason Lyttle) and himself covering the musical bases. The intention was to create a sound that combined the loose, late night, low down groove of JJ Cale with the bittersweet melancholia of late period Nick Lowe and the melodic storytelling of Heyman’s hero Gordon Lightfoot. The record was written mostly at night, after long shifts nights tending bar and is an examination of the loneliness and alienation of the nocturnal life, and the true cost of love.

Heyman started playing and recording in the late 1980s with the Philadelphia based band Go To Blazes. He wrote songs, played guitar, and the band released 5 full-length records and toured the US and Europe extensively before breaking up in 1997. After relocating to San Francisco in 1998, he began working as a sideman, eventually joining local favorites The Court and Spark, as well as Chuck Prophet’s band. All the while he was discovering his voice as a solo artist and bandleader. His second solo record Deliver Me was critically acclaimed, receiving 4 star reviews in both Mojo and Uncut magazine, and songs from the record were heard in the TV shows True Blood, Justified and Damages.

While he often works in a band context, Heyman primarily considers himself a folksinger whose job is to tell stories that draw the listener in to his world.

$30 pre sale - $35 day of show

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