Yonder Field Solar Eclipse Festival

Yonder Field Solar Eclipse Festival

A full day of family fun that includes a giant inflatable obstacle course, games, music from Uncle Kracker along with South Carolina's own Edwin McCain & Corey Smith; capped with a Movie!. Guests will have the option to camp overnight from Sunday, Aug 20th from 4pm until Tuesday, Aug 22 @ 10am. Camping guests must purchase GA Lawn or Great Inflatable Race tickets separately.

Tickets include Solar Eclipse Viewing Glasses for first 2500 attendees..

The Great Inflatable Race includes team competition, a kids competition, and an opportunity for kids of all ages to join in Open Play!! The team and kids competitions will included great prizes for the winners, as well as costume contests for both teams and kids!!

Buy Early!! Ticket Prices increase $5.00 Day of Show.

The Great Inflatable Race

The Great Inflatable Race is the first and original all inflatable obstacle fun run that uses giant inflatables spread throughout the running course. You'll start the race climbing one of our inflatables and then race your friends and family to the next inflatable obstacle. This bouncy course contains between 14 massive inflatables that will bounce, bump and slide you all over the place!

No matter what he does or where he goes, Uncle Kracker adheres to a simple, yet rather timeless philosophy. “I really subscribe to this mindset of just having fun,” he affirms. “That’s what it’s always about. It’s the train that I’m forever on. The way I feel is if I’m enjoying it, it’s really worth doing.”

Now he’s having more fun than ever. Last year Uncle Kracker joined Sugar Ray, Better Than Ezra and Eve 6 for the Under The Sun Tour 2015 hitting sheds across the country throughout the summer. Uncle Kracker will be back on the road in 2016. His live show continues to get bigger and better with every tour. "It's very interactive," he says. "It's meant to be a party, and I want everybody involved. Each time we go on stage, I want people to leave smiling."

That outlook has served him well over the years. After vaulting to stardom as a charismatic presence and chief collaborator in Kid Rock’s Twisted Brown Trucker Band, the Michigan singer, songwriter, and performer, also known as Matthew Shafer, kicked off a stunning solo career of his own.

His 2000 major label debut, Double Wide, fittingly went double-platinum and yielded #1 smash “Follow Me”. Its 2002 follow-up No Stranger To Shame reached gold status and spawned cross-format hits such as “In A Little While” and the powerful cover of Dobie Gray’s “Drift Away”, which set a Billboard record for most weeks at #1 on any chart, topping their #1 run on the Adult Contemporary radio charts for a staggering 28 weeks. Country superstar Kenny Chesney tapped him for “When The Sun Goes Down”, which impressively spent five weeks at #1 on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs Chart. Throughout, he played sold out shows across the country and appeared everywhere from the American Country Music Awards to Late Night With Conan O'Brien. Then, 2012 saw him fully embrace his country side with his critically acclaimed fifth outing, Midnight Special.

Uncle Kracker is still having a blast, and fans worldwide undoubtedly will too when they see him on the road. “When I’m up onstage, I don’t feel removed from the people coming to hear the music,” he leaves off. “You can feel it, when they identify with you. Sometimes when I’m up there, I wanna tell’em ‘I’m not any different than you are.”

The way Corey Smith sees it, he owes a debt to his fans. And it's one he is determined to repay with his 10th album, While the Gettin' Is Good. The project, released on Sugar Hill Records, marks the first time that the singer-songwriter, a wildly popular touring artist who has produced all of his past efforts, has turned over the reins to a bona fide country music producer in Keith Stegall. The result is Smith's most ambitious record yet, as well as a return on the investment made by the fans who have supported him since his first album in 2003.

"A lot of start-up acts are using fan-funded programs to finance their record. That's what my whole career has been: Kickstarter before Kickstarter. When my fans show up and buy a ticket and a t-shirt, they're investing in what I'm doing," says Corey. "It's my responsibility to invest it wisely and give them the best album I can. That's what led me to While the Gettin' Is Good."

It's also what led him to Stegall, who has produced such radio heavyweights as Alan Jackson and Zac Brown Band. It was the producer's track record, country-music experience and easy-going nature that convinced Corey that he was the man to refine his signature acoustic sound. "Keith knows how to make country records," he says, "but I wanted to make my kind of country record and he understood that immediately. He simply wanted to get us comfortable in a studio environment so we could do what we do onstage every night. For me, it was very liberating to be able to focus solely on performing and not be burdened by a lot of the decision-making and drilling down that goes into producing. It was the first time I was able to go into the studio and focus on what I do best. Keith was there to handle the rest."

A collection of 12 songs, While the Gettin' Is Good was written entirely by Corey. As such, it's a deeply personal album, one that explores themes of love, hometown pride and even personal discovery. A close relative inspired one of the record's highlights, "Bend," about learning how to adapt to what life throws at you.

"I wrote 'Bend' about a family member who was struggling with issues and I realized through writing this song that I was also talking about myself at the same time," says Corey, who scored a Top 20 album with The Broken Record in 2011. "So that song really hits home."

Still, the album stands as the Jefferson, Georgia, native's most upbeat. Especially on the nostalgic "Pride," a bouncing look back at Corey's high school days, from pep rallies to game day. His children attend the same school he did and together they often attend high-school football games, where the one-time social studies teacher sees friendly faces from his past.

"I remember sitting up in the stands going, 'Man, this is so cool.' I'm so glad we decided to stay here and let my kids be a part of this tradition," he says. "'Pride' summarizes who I am and even how my career has developed."

Likewise, album opener "Don't Mind" coasts along with a New Orleans vibe, full of fiddle and clarinet. A fun, happy song, it sets the tone for the record and pays tribute to the things we all gladly bear when we're in love. It also epitomizes Corey's current worldview.

"I have a 2006 truck that runs great, so I don't need a new truck. I don't have much time to get on a big lake, so I don't need a bass boat. I could have bought some really cool stuff with the money that I spent on this record, but I didn't, because I'm happy," he says. "It's a privilege to be able to do something like this, finance it myself and not have anyone telling me how my music needs to sound."

Nonetheless, Corey has hit on the perfect song for today's country radio: the approachable ballad "Taking the Edge Off." It's a road-weary travelogue, like Bob Seger's "Turn the Page" or Zac Brown Band's "Colder Weather," about the loneliness of touring and how people who travel combat such feelings.

"It captures a certain mood that we go through, especially in the winter. It's really a grind, it gets cold and lonely, and you're taking the edge off with a drink," he admits. "I remember being in Omaha and it was cold as hell. I worked on that tune throughout the day and night there and every time I hear it, I am transported back to that time."

Now, however, Corey is focused squarely on the future. As the new album title suggests, he's ready to make a determined grab at country's brass ring while the gettin' is good. And with Keith Stegall and Sugar Hill Records behind him, the gettin' has never been better. As the perseverant Corey is fond of saying, "There is more than one way to skin a cat in country music."

"I always dreamed of being able to make a record like this. I wanted to explore all the possibilities of a song and work with a producer who was among the best and who could teach me," he says. "What makes me different is that I write all these songs, and I write them from the heart. I've lived them."

Which is exactly why his fans are willing to go along for the ride and invest so much in an artist who speaks to their way of life. To Corey, While the Gettin' Is Good is his way of opening up his heart, along with his wallet, and paying them back.

"I'm going to take the goodwill they've given me and continually invest it into making better and better records that reflect who I am and my vision," he says. "They've entrusted me with a lot, so I'm trying to be the best steward I can be."

Called the "great American romantic" by the New York Times, Edwin McCain has built an enviable career over the past 20 years by balancing his massive pop success with the year-round touring schedule of a tireless troubadour. His hit songs, authentic spirit and surprisingly affable sense of humor keep fans coming back time and time again for nights that feel more like parties with old friends than rock concerts. After recording two of the biggest love songs in the history of pop music, McCain now performs upwards of 100 shows annually throughout the US as a solo artist, with his full band or his acoustic trio. Recently, he's added orchestras to his repertoire, performing with symphonies in select markets where he brings his powerful songs to majestic new heights.

Those enduring love songs (and wedding must-haves) "I'll Be" and "I Could Not Ask For More" aren't just for the romantic at heart; "American Idol" and "The Voice" contestants turn to Edwin's ballads every single year to help them win over judges and fans alike (just ask last season's AI winner, Nick Fradiani). Even Justin Bieber has been known to belt out "I'll Be" during his own concerts.

Earlier this year, McCain suddenly found himself with a whole new crop of fans when his "Flipping Ships" television show debuted on Animal Planet. "Flipping Ships" took him from the chart tops to the boat shop - his very own Boats Have Souls (www.BoatsHaveSouls.com), a restoration outfit dedicated to bringing life back to vessels and customizing them to perfectly fit their new owners. "We started the business to put good boats into good families' hands by restoring them in ways that might otherwise be financially out of reach," Edwin explains. Viewers were fascinated by the blood, sweat and the occasional tear that he poured into his renovations while rehabbed boats found new life and new owners, including a few non-profit organizations in his homestate of South Carolina. Just like his songs, Edwin's boats all have a story to tell; about the people who built them, Edwin's team who defies all odds to reconstruct them, and the families who take them home.

But his heart remains on the road. Once the "Flipping Ships" season ended, Edwin picked up his guitar once again and returned to the stage. Whenever he can, he likes to drop by favorite club haunts, a comfortable return to his early days that delights both his fans and himself. "The 15-year-old me would have crawled through a river of fire to be the 41-year-old singer/songwriter that I am today, and I remember that. I am incredibly grateful to be able to do this."

$15.00 - $150.00

Tickets

Buy Early!! Ticket Prices increase an additional $5.00 Day of Show.
 

 

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