MoonTower Music Festival, Umphrey's McGee, Benjamin Booker

MoonTower Music Festival

Back in it's fourth year, MoonTower Music Festival is a one-day festival not to be missed! In Lexington, KY, MoonTower shines a light on the local food and beverage scene, local companies, the community, local musicians, and so much more! Sourcing and supporting as many local partners as possible, this festival is;
- Kid friendly
- Dog friendly
- Waste Free
- Kentucky Proud (all food is sourced locally)
- Local brews and beverages

and the best price in the market! Join us to hear the bands you love, new ones you don't know you love - and so much more.

Umphrey's McGee

After 19-plus years of performing more than 100 concerts annually, releasing nine studio albums and selling more than 4.2 million tracks online, Umphrey’s McGee might be forgiven if they chose to rest on their laurels. But then that wouldn’t be consistent with the work ethic demonstrated by the band, which consistently attempts to raise the bar, setting and achieving new goals since forming on the Notre Dame campus in South Bend, Indiana, in 1997. After releasing their eighth studio album, Similar Skin, the first for their own indie label, Nothing Too Fancy (N2F) Music (distributed by RED), the group continued to push the envelope and test the limits. The London Session, was a dream come true for the members having been recorded at the legendary Studio Two at historic Abbey Road. The stealth recording session yielded 10 tracks in a single day, proving once again, the prolific UM waits for no one.

Benjamin Booker (born June 14, 1989 in Virginia Beach, Virginia) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. Based in New Orleans, he cites The Gun Club, Blind Willie Johnson, and T. Rex as influences. His music was described by the Chicago Tribune as "a raw brand of blues/boogie/soul," and by The Independent as "frenzied guitar-strumming and raw, soulful vocals that are hair-raising in intensity."

Cherub is a sexy electro-­‐pop duo that is the dance love-­‐child of 80's funk and pop-­‐ music from the future. The members of Cherub, Jordan Kelley and Jason Huber, share a love for honest original music and vibrant live performance, with a common goal to share a little bit of sex, a little bit of drugs, and a whole lot of love with people across the globe.
Cherub's music is a fresh electrified take on risqué pop music that brings to mind timeless artists such as Prince or Zapp and Roger, and more contemporary artists like Pharrell and The Dream. With a live show that is bouncing with energy, Cherub dances their way into the hearts of audiences from the first falsetto hook, until the very last delay filters out.
2013 saw the release of "100 Bottles" EP with the leadoff infectious smash "Jazzercise '95." In addition to a direct support slot on spring 2013's Age of Reason Tour with Gramatik, the band will be making stops at such festivals as Lollapalooza, Governor's Ball, Austin City Limits, Wakarusa, as well as stops in the UK & Europe.
Named one of Paste Magazine's "12 Tennessee Bands you Should Listen to Now," Cherub had a massive 2012, with appearances at such major festivals as Bonnaroo, SXSW, Electric Forest, Hangout Fest, Snowball Music Fest, and with STS9 at Red Rocks Amphitheater.
After receiving a warm response worldwide to the digital release of the band's first record, Man of the Hour, and touring throughout the US and Mexico, Cherub released their follow up MoM & DaD in February 2012. The album includes the smash viral hit "Doses and Mimosas," which in August 2012 hit #1 on Hype Machine's most talked about songs chart.
The latest batch of Cherub songs brings a fresh, uptempo electro feel to the familiar pop sensibilities showcased on their first record. Jordan Kelley's studio production, clever songcraft, and silky smooth falsetto are complimented perfectly by Jason Huber's live production and tube-­‐driven guitar work. Cherub's versatility in songwriting and dance music production blurs conventional genre barriers. Ranging from grooving heartfelt ballads to risqué club bangers, Cherub takes the throwback vibes of old drum machines and washed out keyboards and marries them with timeless writing and a very modern approach to music production and performance. Playful guitar licks and lush synthesizer textures dance around in the mix, as listeners are treated to sing-­‐a-­‐long hook after hook the entire way through the tunes.

Todd Snider

You don't expect barrelhouse boogie woogie, straight up garage rock or power pop from the ratchety voice who gave you "Talkin' Seattle Grunge Rock Blues," the iconic East Nashville Skyline or the Great American Taxi-backed Time As We Know It: The Songs of Jerry Jeff Walker. Yet fresh from fronting the freewheeling social commentary of the jam-meets-Tom Petty Hard Working Americans – featuring Widespread Panic's Dave Schools and Chris Robinson Brotherhood's Neal Casal – Todd Snider's Eastside Bulldog suggests there's a new kinda rumble under the hood of the iconoclastic troubadour.
"I think if you work so hard to be taken seriously, you've missed the rock and roll," Snider says with a wry smile, equal parts Shakespeare's Puck and naughty teenager. "What's wrong with uptempo and positive? This is Saturday night: crank it up when you're ready to go out, drive too fast, get yer ya-yas out. Just let it go, and dive in -- and get rockin'."
 Random notions sunk into the East Nashville soil when the cabin-fevered folkie would spend time at home. Knowing you can't saturate the market, he'd call up friends like Elizabeth Cook and Kevin Gordon, and hit various bars under the moniker Elmo Buzz & the Bulldogs. The randy, rousing group – "kinda like the Rolling Thunder Review, with horns and girls" – quickly became a hipster's favorite, mating Jerry Lee Lewis' fraught rock with the Kingsmen's swing'n soul.
 Never intended as more than a local kick-out-the-carbons joyride, the Bulldog buzz infected more than East Nashville's 5 Points neighborhood. A day of recording with Emmylou Harris' steelman/original Mavericks' producer Steve Fishell – for a master class he runs – captured the combustion and kinetics in a way that merged crazed music lovers, alcohol and freewheeling musicians.
But it wasn't until manager Burt Stein encouraged Snider to take his Dogs to Cash Cabin to try and catch lightning in a studio one more time that the music from the "mythic" Elmo Buzz, the never-made-it bar-rocker whose schtick the Peace Queer creator "stole," was crystalized, and was finally committed to tape. Eastside Bulldog is romp, a stomp and one hell of a party.
"This," Snider enthuses, "is the afterparty after the party."
From the Bo Diddley grindhouse bully smackdown "Enough Is Enough" to the freewheeling "Secret Agent Man"-style pep club rally "Eastside Bulldogs," the bass heavy, horn squonking instrumental "Bocephus" that evokes the Champs' "Tequila" with its own feverish cry of Hank Williams Jr's nickname to the Fats Domino meets Little Richard rager "37206," which proclaims "I got the tshirt – and the bumper sticker," this is Snider unbridled.
"We're kinda like the Kingsmen: they're always blazing and they barely make it when the vocal kicks in. Like the end of the solo on 'Louie, Louie,' that's my favorite musical moment ever... Because just when you think it's all gonna fall apart, it comes together and explodes. It's so good!"
One listen to the careening refrain of "chicks and cars and partying hard," with Jen Gunderman's pumping piano and Snider's slamming surf guitar on the music business skewering "Hey, Pretty Boy," it's obvious that spun-out fishtailing is where it's at for the man whose writing's been hailed by John Prine, Jimmy Buffett, Kris Kristofferson, Keith Sykes and Guy Clark. Snider sees no compromise or contradiction in these euphoria-pumping party songs.
 "To me, it's a deeper thing: If you don't think 'Whomp Bop A Lu Bop' is genius, you're missing it. As a person in folk, I think 'Sha na NA na NA' or a bunch of 'shadoobies' are the lyric that's got it! 'Tuttti Frutti' is deeper than 'Blowin' In The Wind,' even as the guy who wishes he'd written 'Blowin' In The Wind.' It says more about everything, love, rage, sex – all of it."
It doesn't hurt that Snider's current cavalcade of songs includes the barbed-wire surf guitar strewn trog-pop "Are You With Me," the burlesque-y churn and shuffle of "Come On Up" in full carny barker exhortation or the farfisa power-pop pogo delight of "Ways & Means," which invokes "Private Eyes" songwriter Warren Pash's cash. Even the cacophony meets freefalling "Check It Out" suggests a meth-addled percussive-driven "Land of a 1000 Dances."
"That's the whole idea: it's the opposite of what you expect from me. But I like songs that say, 'Hey, baby, let's rock and roll..,' especially more than once. I like there's lotsa spots to yell. I like that the whole record is over in less than half an hour – and it's all fun!
"I hope my artsy fartsy friends can hear this and like it. For some people, if it's not super-serious and talking about the things they think they should worry about, then it's not art. But you know, the real art is stuff that makes you feel! 
 "You listen to this, and it's not going to matter – as long as it's tonight! And ALL night! As long as my baby's with me, and we're getting it, and..."
 Snider almost runs out of breath. He's fired up. He's ready to party. And for the man who's the post-modern troubadour state-of-the-world pulse taker, it's simple. "This is genuinely my political statement to the world: if you ask me about the election or the state of the world, I'm like Our Party is – We Party Balls! Turn It Up, Man! We're Doomed; Let's Dance!
 "Oh, and all those kick ass, wicked sweet leads? Those are my wicked sweet kick ass leads for the first time! I play about as good as a kid in high school – and that's exactly what we're looking for."
So as the sax bleats and sweats, the tempo bunches and catches, kick off your shoes and drop your center of gravity. For Snider, it's just thus. Get your "Funky Tomato" and go.

Big Sam's Funky Nation

Noladelic PowerFunk. That's the sound Big Sam's Funky Nation have been whipping up for more than a decade. It's high-energy music that mixes funk, rock & roll, hip-hop, and jazz into the same pot, glueing everything together with the brassy influence — and heavy grooves — of New Orleans.

From national performances at Bonnaroo and Austin City Limits to hometown appearances Voodoo Fest and Jazz Fest, Big Sam's Funky Nation have built their reputation onstage. The band's live performance are legendary, filled with blasts of brass, bursts of electric guitar, and the charisma of Big Sam, a frontman who sings, plays, dances, and involves the audience in everything he does. You don't just watch a Funky Nation show. You become part of the show, singing along with Big Sam whenever he demands a call-and-response.

A native of New Orleans, Big Sam first rose to fame as a member of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, whose touring schedule kept the young trombonist on the road for 300 days a year. The group performed with bands from all genres, backing up Widespread Panic one minute before sharing the stage with Dave Matthews Band the next. A fan of diverse bands like Parliament Funkadelic, Jimi Hendrix, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Living Colour, and Prince, Big Sam loved the variety that Dirty Dozen Brass Band offered. He wanted to front his own group, though. He needed to sing, to engage the crowd, to write his own songs. Inspired to chase down that dream, he formed Big Sam's Funky Nation, reaching out to some of his favorite players from around the Big Easy — including Joshua Connelly, Chocolate Milk, Jerry "J Blakk" Henderson, and Drew "Da Phessah" Baham — to create his own supergroup.

Big Sam isn't the only member of the Funky Nation to sport some serious credentials. J Blakk kicked off his career as a trumpet player, even performing with Southern University's marching band — Human Jukebox — before finding his love for bass. Horn player Da Phessah established himself around town as an in-demand producer and multi-instrumentalist. Guitar player Connelly grew up on rock & roll, eventually growing into a world-class musician whose style dips into rock, funk and jazz. Chocolate Milk began drumming in church. Together, those five musicians make up Big Sam's Funky Nation, a group that knows no boundaries, no limits, no restrictions — only the thrill that comes from playing music inspired by the thrills of their New Orleans hometown.

"We don't cater to one demographic," says Big Sam, rattling off a list of jam band festivals, jazz shows, rock clubs, and funk gigs that his band has played since 2007. "We play music for everybody. It's not just funk; that's the foundation, but the music goes from funk to rock to wild jazz. It's music about love and partying. Everyone can get down with that."

Blackfoot Gypsies

Blackfoot Gypsies is Matthew Paige (vocals, guitar), Zack Murphy (drums), Dylan Whitlow (bass, vocals) and Ollie Dogg (harmonica). The band have shared bills with everyone from the Alabama Shakes and Trampled by Turtles to Futurebirds, The Ettes and The Carolina Chocolate Drops. East Nashvillian testifies that “…Blackfoot Gypsies’ live performances are inducing pure rock & roll highs in audiences…” While the Examiner adds “The Blackfoot Gypsies deliver a raw blues infused sound loaded with chunky guitar riffs, rowdy keyboards and wailing vocals.” AllMusic dubs the band’s material “garage rock, electric blues and Southern swagger.”

Tyler Childers

Nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in Kentucky is a little town called, Paintsville, where the economy is dependent on the dying coal industry and a tradition of music thrives with the US 23 Country Music Highway Museum and Butcher Hollow. Carrying on the music tradition is native son and current Lexington, Kentucky resident, Tyler Childers.

Paintsville is located in the Big Sandy River Valley of Johnson County in Eastern Kentucky made famous for its lawlessness, religion, and booze, and a song about a horse thief, a rambling man, and an attempt to gain some good ol' Appalachian self-justice is what "William Hill" is all about. Following his "Papaw" around to the Kentucky social institutions – church events and barber shops to name a few– as well as a lot of coon hunting with his dad, Tyler has heard a tale or two about the misadventures of a few good ol' boys and he gives his own spin of these accounts behind a whisky-soaked voice well beyond his age of 22.

Vita & The Woolf

Vita and the Woolf is the brain child of Jennifer Pague. It is an electronic soul pop musical group from Philadelphia. The band name was inspired by the love relationship between novelists Vita Sackville and Virginia Woolf.

Much of the music is vocal driven and includes a wide range of harmonies. Many have compared Pague's voice to that of Florence Welch. Jennifer Pague has been writing songs under the Vita moniker for the past two years. Her romantically tragic and adventuresome lyrics tie into her European travels to Belgium and the Netherlands.

The haunting harmonies and vocal layering combined with crazy instrumentation and simple drumming produce a sound that reflects R&B, soul, jazz, and powerful choral ballads.

$0.00 - $75.00

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