Rangda

Rangda

Rangda is the kind of group that clued-in music snobs can only dream of forming. At its core is the twin virtuoso guitar attack of Richard Bishop, of the sorely missed Sun City Girls and his own instructive solo recordings, and Ben Chasny, the man behind the Six Organs of Admittance moniker, and a member of Comets on Fire and numerous other musical formations. The lineup is rounded out by drummer Chris Corsano, who has worked with everyone from Bjork to Jandek to legendary British free-jazz saxophonist Evan Parker. After circling the idea for years, the three finally halted their schedules in order to record their first record, False Flag, which was released by Drag City in 2010. This was followed in 2012 by their second album, Formerly Extinct (also on Drag City). Since then they have released a live 10” record (Rangda Live in Krefeld) on Germany’s Unrock label, and a split LP with The Dead C on Ba Da Bing!
Bishop, Chasny and Corsano bring decades of experience to the collective table. It is estimated that they’ve appeared on over 400 albums between the three of them. The knowledge each has gained from working as solo performers, as well as with others, allows them to effortlessly move freely as a unit, engaging themselves in improvisational blow-outs, extended psychedelic explorations, odd-metered compositions, and anything else that is required.
Rangda have recently recorded their third full-length record which will be released by Drag City in early 2016.

Alan Licht

Born in 1968 and raised in New Jersey, I took guitar lessons at the age of ten and went on to play in typical high school cover bands and to study jazz guitar privately with Buck Brown. In my late teens, as my interests expanded to the avant-garde, I attended a seminar on improvisation given by noted west coast guitarist Henry Kaiser. Enrolling at Vassar College, I studied electronic music with Linda Fisher and composition with Annea Lockwood and Richard Wilson. By the time I graduated in 1990, I had already published articles on Minimalist composers La Monte Young, Tony Conrad, Rhys Chatham, and Charlemagne Palestine, and had recorded with former John Coltrane drummer Rashied Ali (on Rudolph Grey's Mask of Light LP).


Relocating to New York City, I focused on pursuing free improvisation (with Rudolph Grey's group the Blue Humans and guitarist Loren Mazzacane Connors) as well as indie rock (the bands Love Child and Run On, as well as a brief stint with legendary 60s psychedelic rock band Arthur Lee & Love). I also began developing a repertoire of structured improvisation pieces for solo electric guitar, documented on a series of albums starting with 1994's Sink the Aging Process. These brought together my interests in reharmonization (from jazz and classical music), process, repetition, and extended duration (from Minimalism), and the textural vocabularies of rock and noise music. The albums also include tape pieces and organ works. In 1998 I began writing frequently for the British experimental music magazine The WIRE, doing several cover stories and other features. In 2000 I started handling bookings at Tonic, the estimable New York venue dedicated to showcasing a wide range of alternative music, from free improvisation to underground rock to electronica to the jazz and classical avant-gardes. This brought me into contact with numerous musicians, and I performed at Tonic myself countless times. In 2001 I co-founded the ensemble Text of Light with Sonic Youth guitarist Lee Ranaldo, a project that brings together free improvisation with screenings of historic examples of experimental cinema. Text of Light emphasizes the chance correspondences between what is happening onscreen and what is happening in the music, as a kind of live, real-time mixed-media collage. Subsequently I have made audiovisual collaborations with video artist and long-time Merce Cunningham associate Charles Atlas and Emmy-winning painter, designer and comics artist Gary Panter, which operated under similar principles. 2002 saw the publication of my first book, An Emotional Memoir of Martha Quinn, an extended personal essay about coming of age as a rock fan and musician. In 2007 my second book, Sound Art: Beyond Music, Between Categories was published - significant as the first full-length study of sound installations and sound sculpture to be published in English, and the first to examine the genre mainly from an art historical, rather than a quasi-philosophical, viewpoint.


Any free improviser is also an audience member, as he or she is hearing the music for the first time. I brought this idea to performances I organized under the name the Digger Choir at Issue Project Room in 2003-2004 that conflated the roles of audience member and performer. Everyone who attended was responsible for performing the music-singing John Stevens' Sustained Piece and Yoko Ono's John Let's Hope For Piece as well as my own pieces like Subway Piece, in which they were instructed to read a magazine or book they would ordinarily read to themselves in transit out loud. The idea of speaking texts aloud that are meant to be read silently also occurs in two of my recent sound installations: On Deaf Ears (2009), in which an article about the possible hearing loss incurred by listening to music on iPod earbuds at high volume was recorded being read aloud, and played as a loop on AVA Gallery's outdoor speakers; and Cross Promotion (2010), in which the proprietors of both AVA and Diapason read aloud their press releases for coming exhibitions, the recordings were then installed in each other's gallery space. These pieces play not only on sound art's investigations of latent sounds, but on my dual work practice as a musician and a writer.


In 2010 I started a project called Title TK with media artist Cory Archangel and curator Howie Chen. Cory, Howie and I are all guitarists. Considering ourselves a band, in live appearances we walk onstage with guitars but never plug them in or play; instead we simply talk to each other (mostly about music). These talks are improvised, and to me represent a negotiation between spoken and musical languages, underlining the linguistic implications of musical vocabularies and the conversational aspects of group improvisation. They also represent an application of "post- studio art" ideas to music, in removing what would be expected as essential content from the rock band format. Finally, they build upon my personal history, making a conceptual accommodation between my parallel existences in the 90s as a rock band member and free improviser. More recent activities include recording and touring with Lee Ranaldo & the Dust, an improv trio with Aki Onda and artist/filmmaker Michael Snow, a duo with Yeah Yeah Yeahs drummer Brian Chase, and a book-length interview with Will Oldham, Will Oldham on Bonnie "Prince" Billy (Faber & Faber (UK), W.W. Norton (US), Contra (Spain), 2012).

"Licht composes like the writer that he is. Ideas - simply stated and highly effective - emerge from a collage of everything from loops of raw guitar to radio weather reports." -- Christian Marclay on AL's double CD A New York Minute in Best of 2003, ARTFORUM, December 2003.


"Be it in indie rock groups, improv ensembles, or his solo compositions, guitarist and writer Alan Licht has spent his career smuggling ideas across the obscured bridge between harmony and noise." -- Matthew Wuethrich, the WIRE, June 2008

o13 creates an evolving texture of music, a piercing electronic post-punk, a future that never manifested itself, spectral, uncompromising portals of electronic dread.
For the better part of the '80s, Mark C was leading legendary New York noise band Live Skull as they were deconstructing the rock song with thick gritty bass and streety guitar. Among their eight releases on Caroline and Homestead, Live Skull's "Bringing Home the Bait" has been deservingly referred to as the "Best Noise Rock Post Punk New Wave No Wave Experimental Indie Emo Goth Album Ever."
Meanwhile, Stuart Argabright was sketching his sonic vision of gothic futurism in Ike Yard, the first NY group on Factory Records America, also one of the first true purveyors of experimental, time-shifting electronic music. It is a torch that they still carry today with a searing pyre. Stuart continued his visionary pursuit as a founding member of Death Comet Crew, Dominatrix, and Black Rain, as well as the galaxy-striding Bi-Conicals of Rammellzee.
After releasing four acclaimed albums with The Holy Ghost, the last on Fargo Records, bassist Kent Heine met up with Stuart and Mark to form o13.
In 2010, o13 produced Vandal Tribes, an audio movie EP with guests Judy Nylon & Jamie Teasdale, aka Vex'd. o13 also began preproduction of a video for a series of events based on author JG Ballard's works. Along with a live score, the band eventually offered o13 Presents: The Atrocity Exhibition to audiences. The video/audio experience was last presented at the Serralves Foundation in Porto, Portugal, and continues to be part of the band's live arsenal. In addition, o13's music was recently featured in BAM150, a documentary celebrating the historic Brooklyn Academy of Music. Following a couple of European tours, o13 has now finished its first album Time Wave Zero to be released on desire. Time Wave Zero glides through time and space like a lucid dreaming dragonfly, settling on songs, scenes, and improvisations from a new post-modern American songbook.

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