SoundHarvest Music Festival

SoundHarvest Music Festival

Flaming Lips

Of the innumerable one-hit wonders littering the cultural landscape, few, if any, were so brave, so frequently brilliant, and so deliciously weird as the Flaming Lips. To even classify the Lips as merely a one-hit wonder is to do the group a grave injustice: although their standing as a commercial entity proved little more than a blip on the radar screen, their moment of Top 40 success was simply another pit-stop on one of the more surreal and haphazard career trajectories in pop music -- an acid-bubblegum band with as much affinity for sweet melodies as blistering noise assaults, their off-kilter sound, uncommon emotional depth, and bizarre history (packed with tales of self-immolating fans and the like) firmly established them as one of the true originals of the post-punk era.

Allen Stone

On his third full-length album, singer/songwriter Allen Stone proves himself deeply devoted to making uncompromisingly soulful music that transcends all pop convention. Stone's debut for Capitol Records, Radius marks the follow-up to the Chewelah, Washington-bred 28-year-old's self-released and self-titled sophomore effort, a 2011 album that climbed to the top 10 on Billboard's Heatseekers chart and gained acclaim from renowned rock critic Ann Powers (whose NPR review hailed Allen Stone as "meant for those of us who like our R&B slightly unkempt and exceedingly feelingful"). Made in collaboration with Swedish soul singer/songwriter/phenom Magnus Tingsek, Stone's latest batch of songs capture the warm energy of that creative connection and transport the listener to a higher and more exalted plane.

Culled from several dozen songs penned through a year and a half of constant writing and refining, Radius bears a title that reflects both its scope and intimacy. "The radius is that line extending from the center of the circle to its exterior," says Stone, "and in a lot of ways this album is about getting out things deep inside—whether it's love or insecurity or joy or frustration about things going on today." Along with immersing himself in a songwriting approach that involved unflinching examination of "some very dark and negative moments in my life," Stone shaped the sound and feel of Radius by pushing himself to "get past the boundaries of what I felt comfortable with, so that I could progress into a whole new level of creativity." Despite that sometimes-daunting process, Radius wholly reveals Stone's easy grace in blending everything from edgy soul-pop and earthy folk-rock to throwback R&B and Parliament-inspired funk.

Radius first began to come to life back in the fall of 2013, when Stone headed to Sweden to join in a writing session with Tingsek. "His musicality is so outside-the-box, and it really stretched me as an artist," says Stone, who'd tapped Tingsek as one of his opening acts for an 85-date headlining tour in 2012. "We just kept on throwing a wrench into the works and tried to create something that's the complete antithesis of what you'd expect from pop music." After recording the bulk of the album in Sweden, Stone rounded out Radius's production at his own studio in the woods of northeast Washington and in L.A.-based sessions with producers like Benny Cassette (who's previously worked with Kanye West) and Malay (a co-producer on Frank Ocean's channel ORANGE).

Like many of his own musical heroes—Stevie Wonder chief among them—Stone pulls off the near-magical feat of channeling a weight-of-the-world sensitivity into his songs while still radiating hope and promise. And though that depth of consciousness feels transmitted from a more golden era, Radius continually hones in on issues both timeless and of-the-moment, with Stone's breezily poetic lyrics touching on topics ranging from rampant materialism (on the tenderly string-accented, harmony-soaked "American Privilege") and the toxic takeover of technology in art (on the gutsy and groove-heavy "Fake Future"). "That song's mainly about how technology's infiltrating music in a way that's making it less and less human and taking all the heart out of it," Stone says of the latter track, a soul-pop powerhouse peppered with playfully cutting lines like "Rock stars pushing buttons/Few actually play/City wasn't ever built on lights and Special K." And as evidenced by Radius's lush yet raw sonic landscape—wherein the only hint of synth comes from a Moog analog synthesizer—Stone stayed true to his pledge to "keep fakeness completely out of this record" and rely entirely on live instrumentation.

Equally introspective and outwardly searching, Radius also finds Stone exploring intensely personal matters, such as depression on the stark and lovely, acoustic-guitar-woven ballad "Circle" ("That one was written at a pretty dark time for me," Stone points out. "It's about how depression can put you into a kind of circle, where you're just trying to find a way out but it keeps on leading you back inside"). Showing his skill at crafting a killer love song as well, Stone looks at heartbreak and regret on the aching, electric-piano-infused "I Know That I Wasn't Right," slips into hopeless romanticism on the dreamy R&B pastiche "Barbwire," and unleashes some starry-eyed affection on the dancefloor-ready "Symmetrical" (a sample lyric: "The angle of your spine/Is sending lightning bolts down mine/When those molecules combine/It's astronomically divine"). And in tracks like the ultra-catchy album-opener "Perfect World" and the fiery, horn-laced "Freedom," Radius unfolds into epically joyful anthems that show the full range and power of Stone's vocals.

Stone started working those vocals as a kid, thanks largely to his parents' influence. "My father was a minister so I spent about half my childhood in church, watching my mom and dad sing together and lead the congregation in song," he recalls. By the time he was 11 he'd picked up a guitar and written his first song, and soon began self-recording demo tapes to pass along to classmates. Although Stone enrolled in bible college after high school, he quickly dropped out to move to Seattle and kickstart his music career. "I had an '87 Buick and I'd drive up and down the west coast, playing any gig I could get just to try to put my music out there," he says.

At age 22, Stone self-released his debut album, 2010's Last To Speak. But it was his self-titled follow-up (on which he joined forces with former Miles Davis keyboardist Deron Johnson) that ended up earning him serious recognition. Along with entering the top five on iTunes' R&B/Soul chart after its digital release, Allen Stone prompted him to score appearances on such late-night talk shows like Conan and grace the pages of publications like the New York Times (whose chief popular-music critic Jon Pareles praised Stone for possessing "a tenor voice with the eagerness and frisky syncopations of [Stevie] Wonder"). And upon partnering with ATO Records for a physical release of his self-titled album in 2012, Stone soon turned up on the likes of the Late Show with David Letterman and landed a gig as the opening act for soul legend Al Green. In the midst of all the buzz, he also took up a grueling touring schedule, tearing through nearly 600 shows in just two years.

For Stone, all that time onstage went a long way in preparing him for the many creative breakthroughs he's made on Radius. "I think you really grow as a musician when you're playing right in front of people, and for me constantly growing and progressing and getting better is really the most important thing," he says. Ruminating on the emotional undertones of his new album's title and noting that "the center of me is my heart," Stone says he also hopes that Radius will ultimately help listeners shed new light on their own struggles. "There've been times in my life when records were my saving grace and really helped me to figure out who I am, and I'd love for my music to have that kind of impact on a kid who's looking for his or her own place in this life," he says. "Because I absolutely believe that if you're going to stand at a microphone and say something, you need to recognize that as a privilege. You've got to be incredibly careful about it, and really put all your heart into the message that you're sending out into the world."

Benjamin Booker

Benjamin Booker is a young New Orleans based singer-songwriter, influenced by The Gun Club, Blind Willie Johnson, and T. Rex.

"A fierce debut." – Rolling Stone

"Contender for rock record of the year." – SPIN

"a raucous, unruly mix of punk, blues rock and soul" – New York Times

"The suavest kid in Southern Rock." – GQ

"If you've not heard of Benjamin Booker yet, get ready." - NPR

When Benjamin Booker played Lollapalooza, Rolling Stone named him the weekend's Best Rock Star Moment ("though Lollapalooza is always filled with countless rock acts, Booker may have been the strongest and most refreshing"). When he played Newport Folk Fest, Billboard named him the second best performance of the entire event ("a tight, raucous set that comes with enough well-placed gaps in the riffage onslaught to highlight his searching, soulful lyrics"). When he toured opening for Jack White, Jack brought him back out during his own set for a show-closing guitar duel.

The Last Internationale

Founded by New York City natives Delila Paz and Edgey Pires, The Last Internationale quickly forged a reputation for poetic, socially conscious songs and explosive live performances. Tom Morello (Rage Against the Machine), noted, "The Last Internationale are one of my favorites in the next wave of rebel rockers. They're raw and real and mix East Village rock sensibilities with Battleship Potemkin firepower."

Over Thanksgiving dinner at Morello's home, talk turned to the duo's need for a drummer. Morello suggested they talk with Brad Wilk (Rage Against the Machine, Audioslave), and got Brad on the phone. After hearing the material and bonding with Edgey & Delila, Wilk signed on. The Last Internationale's debut album - Brendan O'Brien (Bruce Springsteen, Pearl Jam, Neil Young) - will be released by Epic Records in 2014.

A few words on The Last Internationale written by Bill Ayers:
Shortly after the legendary rebel singer Pete Seeger passed from this world, a friend passed on to me We Will Reign from The Last Internationale—and life came back into balance. Sad to say so long to Pete who'd provided so many sweet harmonies for many, many righteous campaigns gone by, but ecstatic to meet the newest phoenix rising from the old and laying down a powerful soundtrack for what lies ahead. Delila's strikingly lucid voice, Edgey's driving chords, Brad's perfect beats mixed with a vision that synchronizes: it's all such a stunning symmetry.
The Last Internationale picks up the torch carried in various places and at different times by Bob Marley and the Wailers, Nina Simone, Public Enemy, Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, Rage Against the Machine, and hundreds more. That torch is deployed here to illuminate the dark spaces of injustice as well as to light up a path toward freedom. The Last Internationale speaks with passion and intimacy to anarchists and guerrillas, to comrades-in-arms, to friends and strangers alike, tripping and running, busting out of jail—breaking all the entanglements that ensnare us, all the cotton wool that smothers us—searching out the rhythms of resistance, and deploying every one of the weapons within reach: truth-telling and courage, beauty and form, abiding patience and infinite perseverance, indignation, urgency, incitement, and mostly love. These power-house rebel-rockers hold the torch with renewed confidence and a sparkling fresh spirit.
We Will Reign overflows with emotional richness and humanity, challenges us to throw off the lifeless, unpleasant, and unerotic in our lives, and announces a profound truth: any revolution worth having will be powered by a deep desire for joy as well as justice. We can feel the thud of the police stick and the searing pain of the interrogation cell, but also the exhilaration of choosing to lead a moral life in a world gone mad, and the power of pursuing a politics based on freedom dreams beyond dogma and opportunism. The music hums with the universal hope for a world in balance and at peace, and it's punctuated with the most basic human cry: I shall create! I found myself provoked and agitated, gasping for air, talking to myself and hollering back, laughing through tears while screaming above the ecstasy. WWR does what good art demands: I was in orbit.

"If my Southern heart's still pumping blood/I'll bury my money in the mighty Mississippi mud," sings The Weeks' Cyle Barnes on Dear Bo Jackson's "Brother In The Night." "If my Southern lungs won't let me breathe/I'll wait for the cicadas and I'll let 'em push it out for me."

With that powerful verse, The Weeks stake a claim as heirs to the timeless tradition of Southern rock. Dear Bo Jackson, the Nashville-based band's Serpents and Snakes debut, sees them enriching their already well-seasoned sonic stew with the classic flavors of soul, R&B, funk, and heavy boogie to fashion a forward-facing sound all their own. Big brass, lush strings, and twangy pedal steel have been fused into their distinctive sludge pop, with Sam Williams' greasy guitars and the highly charged engine room of bassist Damien Bone and drummer/Cyle's brother Cain Barnes. Throughout the album, songs like the aforementioned "Brother In The Night" and the exuberant title track see Cyle Barnes rending his throat raw as he testifies dramatic and truthful tales of modern Southern lives, always full of hope despite often punishing circumstances.

"The South is a different beast than the rest of the world," he says. "We've all been aged and worn in a very fine way because of it. I think even if we didn't want to write about the South, it'd still come out in our songs."

Born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi, The Weeks came together in 2006 and instantly came to define the sound of Southern Rock in the 21st Century – their grunge-powered, high-octane anthems rich with a bottomless Delta soul far deeper than the boys' teenage years would suggest. Like any great rock 'n' roll outfit worth its salt, The Weeks played as often as humanly possible, with countless club dates across the Southeast and tours alongside such like-minded acts as Local H, North Mississippi Allstars, and the one and only Meat Puppets. Their extraordinary energy and outsized performances – not to mention a series of well-received independently issued releases – earned them a fervent fan following and ultimately, a deal with the like-minded Serpents and Snakes Records.

By summer 2010, it had become clear that sleepy Jackson could no longer contain the mighty Weeks. The band left their old Mississippi home for the bright lights of Nashville, and, as Williams says, "it's been non-stop ever since." Serpents and Snakes reissued the band's second full-length outing, Gutter Gaunt Gangster, earning them reams of national applause, including Amazon.com naming the collection among its top 10 "Outstanding 2012 Albums You Might Have Missed."

Where that album – like all The Weeks' previous recordings – was recorded fast and on the cheap, the band opted to take a more leisurely tack in making its follow-up. They spent six months at pre-production, resulting the most fully articulated demos of their career. When time came to record the album proper, their search for a producer led them to Paul Moak, a Grammy Award-nominated producer/engineer/mixer and perhaps most importantly, a fellow Jacksonian.

Our shoes are tattered and torn, but our feet are dry. As for our places in history, we will run naked through your streets before we sit decorated in your halls.

Goodbye June

Life's unpredictable purpose always seems to stem from life's worst tragedies. That is just how Goodbye June was created. In June of 2005, guitarist Tyler Baker received the worst news of his life. His brother, PFC Shane Baker, was home on leave from the military and had been in a fatal car accident. His cousins Brandon Qualkenbush, Landon Milbourn and the rest of the family traveled to southern Indiana to comfort and ease the sting of unexpectedly losing a close loved one. For the next few weeks, the three cousins stayed together to comfort each other, reminisce about old times, laugh and cry over memories and, of course, play music together which essentially lead to the three of them writing songs to help pass the time.

In the months that followed, Landon, Brandon and Tyler, all first cousins, began spending more time together in a makeshift rehearsal space in Tyler's basement. "Music became a healthy emotional release," says Landon, "which helped us to start the healing process and move forward with our lives." When songs formed, they would take them to a local studio used to record jingles and radio commercials and started recording a demo. Once the demo was ready and they had a few shows under their belt, their family and friends began asking what their band name was. "We decided to name the band Goodbye June, to honor the memory of our brother passing and encapsulate what inspired the beginnings of this band," explains Brandon, "if he wouldn't have passed, I'd probably still be painting and never would have pursued music as a career."

Brandon's father, a Pentecostal preacher, and Landon's father, a choir director, evangelized throughout the Bible belt during their childhood. Naturally, the cousins played and sang during these fiery Pentecostal church services. However, their musical influences are not confined to only the music they played in the sanctuary. "I would go and play at the Player's Pub [a local blues bar in Bloomington, Indiana] and sit in on songs by anyone from Stevie Ray Vaughan to Booker T & The MG's," says Tyler. "It changed the way I thought about music. The music was built around moving people, much like the gospel music I was used to playing." During their teens, Landon and Brandon found themselves listening to the secular music that was never allowed in their homes during childhood. "I remember sneaking in Bush's Razorblade Suitcase record into my room and playing it with the volume turned down so low I had to have my ear right next to the speaker so my parents couldn't hear it," reminisces Brandon. You can hear these shadows of black gospel, blues, and old country hymns mixed into Goodbye June's brand of rock.

Over the next three years after that long summer of 2005, the boys of Goodbye June began playing their material across the Midwest. They packed up their equipment in a borrowed trailer from a close family friend, and played to whoever would give them a stage. They returned home with stories about near death experiences, sleepless, rowdy nights and a flock of new fans throughout the Midwest. Goodbye June was on the map, and they have been pushing forward ever since. In 2009, taking the advice of close friends in the music industry, the cousins made the plunge and moved to Nashville TN, and became part of Music City's emerging rock scene.

The members of Goodbye June have spent much of the past decade honing their skill as songwriters along with their proficiency as vocalists and musicians. Although Landon and Brandon are principally identified playing acoustic guitar and electric guitar, both cousins also play piano, drums, accordion and most anything else with strings or keys. Tyler always joked that he could "just play guitar" and that made him less of a man when compared to his multi-talented 1st cousins. Clearly, however, the sum of their collective efforts makes for a much greater musical experience. They typically write together and draw off of each other's ideas. Being strong songwriters individually, and even stronger as a unit, there is never any shortage of material to build songs around. They have no set method to the songwriting process; the only constant is that everyone gets involved at some point. The fact is, the cousins of Goodbye June are constantly working on their music and perfecting their artistry, because they know that's what it takes to make music that matters.

With the availability of a professional studio at their fingertips and veteran producer from Nashville, John Smith, guiding the recording process, Goodbye June has produced the strongest set of songs they have written thus far. "The cousins have an incredibly strong work ethic," affirms John Smith, manager & co-producer of Goodbye June's forthcoming album, "and they continually work at bettering themselves. Hearing cousins, who have sung and played together virtually their whole lives, brings something special to the table unique to Goodbye June."

The guys are extremely excited for what's to come in 2013. Their debut album Nor The Wild Music Flow has just been released with CVR (Cotton Valley Records) along with their highly anticipated debut music video featuring St. Louis Rams head coach Jeff Fisher and country star Steve Holy. Goodbye June has also released a followup to the shoot-em-up "Microscope" with the "Out of Your Mind" music video. Nor The Wild Music Flow is a diverse album that brings an energetic sound to the table that is difficult to unearth. With the release of the album, the band has signed nearly 20 licenses for major television networks including MTV, Discovery, ESPN, Bravo, E!, Showtime, and more. Goodbye June is currently touring in support of the new album.

Scotty Bratcher

Scotty has played with and opened for names like Ted Nugent, Little Texas, Blue Oyster Cult, Buddy Guy, Joe Bonamassa, Chris Duarte, Anthony Gomes, Foghat, Lonnie Brooks, Ronnie and Wayne Baker Brooks, Bob Margolin, Eddie "the Chief" Clearwater, Lonnie Mack, Walter Trout, .38 Special, Styx, Peter Frampton, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Tinsley Ellis, Lou Graham of Foreigner, Dickey Betts of the Allman Brothers Band, Delbert McClinton, Lee Roy Parnell, and many more.
Scotty is also an accomplished studio musician who has recorded with many blues, rock, country, gospel, funk and even heavy metal artists.
As of 2007 and since, Scotty also joined forces with Noah Hunt, lead singer for the Kenny Wayne Shepherd band, as the guitar player and 2nd vocalist of the group The 420 Allstars featuring Noah Hunt.
In 2013, the album "All and Nothing More" was released featuring many new original songs, and a few covers featuring legendary Southern rocker Jimmy Hall. After the release, Mr. Hall contacted Scotty about starting a side project together, adding yet another schedule full of opportunities to see Scotty perform around the country, and sometimes out of it!

$45.00 - $100.00

Tickets

For information, visit www.soundharvest.com.

 

*Please note: We do not share your personal information with third parties.

Upcoming Events
Centennial Park

  • Sorry, there are currently no upcoming events.