Diarrhea Planet

Diarrhea Planet

The gravitational pull of Diarrhea Planet is strong; once you get caught in the orbit of its stadium-sized riffs and blistering solos, it’s hard to escape. The Nashville six-piece has been melting faces since its debut 7” Aloha first started making waves outside the leafy campus of Belmont University, where its members first met. What started as a dorm room dick joke between two friends bored by the music-business ladder-climbing of their classmates has grown into one of the biggest—and loudest—rock acts to come out of Nashville since their big bros and labelmates in JEFF The Brotherhood. As they toured the country behind their critically acclaimed 2013 LP I’m Rich Beyond Your Wildest Dreams, the likes of Billboard, Rolling Stone, SPIN, and even BuzzFeed have taken notice. Ignore them at your own peril.

On their latest LP for Infinity Cat Recordings, Turn to Gold, the Planet boys worked with Vance Powell, the Grammy-winning engineer and Jack White confidant. Powell used his expertise in recording live sound to capture some of the energy of the Diarrhea Planet live experience—they tracked the main guitar and drum tracks live, in the same room, for a record that’s both massive and frenetic. It’s easily the most sophisticated and complex music they’ve ever made, but still carries the joyous irreverence that minted thousands of RAWK fans across the country.

The band’s rhythm section, which features drummer Ian Bush (a.k.a. Tuff Gus) and bassist Mike Boyle, is the bedrock on which the foundation is built, but what makes Diarrhea Planet explode is the raw power of its four guitars. Not one note is wasted, and each ax slinger plays a role; Jordan Smith writes soaring power pop singalong hooks; Brent Toler brings a classic rock sensibility and chunky, fuzzy riffs; Emmett Miller’s wields classical training and a wizard-like five-finger pick-less technique for mind-bending, finger-tapping solos; and Evan Bird is the glue that holds them all together, capable of playing any part (or instrument) as needed.

Diarrhea Planet is a nationally touring band, playing a punishing schedule of more than 200 shows a year. But they cut their teeth in the clubs and house shows of the Nashville DIY scene, built by the likes of JEFF, Heavy Cream, Natural Child, Pujol, and shaped in legendary spaces like the old police precinct that would come to be known as Glenn Danzig’s House. As they’ve graduated from living rooms to clubs to festivals, the energy has remained constant—just ask the ladies in the mosh pit or the crowdsurfing dads you’re sure to find at any Diarrhea Planet show. They’re carrying the torch for the past, present and future of rock, and you’d be wise to take notice—everyone else sure has.

Left & Right

Hailing from Philadelphia by way of Charlottesville, VA, Left & Right used to be a sloppy college band of four university transit bus drivers in Charlottesville: Daniel, Phil, Andrew, and Zak. Daniel Merchant and Phil Dameron (guitars/vocals) started the band after their old band broke up. Andrew Abbott was really good at playing bass so they asked him to join. Zak Krone lied about being able to drum so he could also be a part of the band. (It worked out in the end.)

After college, they cut the shit, kept the name, and headed for Philadelphia, where they snagged jobs as baristas and "ice-cream scoopsmen." You might think they sound kinda like those cool North Carolina indie bands from the 90s that your older brother used to listen to, like Archers of Loaf and Superchunk. After all, they've got that raucous lo-fi sound, those clever lyrics, and that unstoppable drive. They're going for it-- in a 2004 Honda Odyssey that has 168,000 miles on it and 168,000 more miles to go!

Five Year Plan is Left & Right's third album and their first for Infinity Cat Recordings. Drawing heavily from Gen-X indie rock, the album twists and turns between relentlessly energetic pop-punk and soaring slow-jams, capturing both the melancholia and joy of a quarter-life crisis with its endless hooks. It's music for getting together, breaking up, grabbing a slice of pizza, and doing it all over again. Never has being bummed out sounded so fun.

Sun Valley Gun Club

"...ripped from the body of a time-traveling slacker circa 1995..." — Symbiotic Reviews

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