Watch & Listen

Green River Festival 2014

Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band

The Beast In Its Tracks, the new album from renowned singer-songwriter Josh Ritter, was released on March 5 on Pytheas Recordings. Of the record, Ritter says, "In the year after my marriage ended, I realized that I had more new songs than I'd ever had at one time. Far from the grand, sweeping feel of the songs on So Runs the World Away, these new songs felt like rocks in the shoe, hard little nuggets of whatever they were, be it spite, remorse, or happiness."

Recorded during 2011-2012 at the Great North Sound Society in Parsonsfield, Maine, The Beast In Its Tracks continues Ritter's longtime collaboration with producer and keyboard player Sam Kassirer. As Josh describes, "I hadn't composed this stuff, I'd scrawled it down, just trying to keep ahead of the heartbreak. They needed to be recorded like that. We needed to work fast, make decisions quickly, keep the songs as spare as they could be kept, and above all never allow ourselves to blunt the sharp edges. Some of the songs were mean or evil. So be it."

The new album follows Ritter's 2010 release, So Runs The World Away, of which Bob Boilen from NPR Music declared, "I've come to expect good records from him...but this one took my breath away," while the Boston Globe praised, "quite sensational…marks the finest music he has made."

In 2011, Ritter made his debut as a published author with his New York Times Best-selling novel, Bright's Passage (Dial Press/Random House). Of the work, Stephen King writes in The New York Times Book Review, "Shines with a compressed lyricism that recalls Ray Bradbury in his prime . . . This is the work of a gifted novelist."

Lucius knew from the start they were on to something special. Centered around the powerful voices and compelling songwriting of Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig, the Brooklyn band has evolved from a promising duo into a dynamic quintet whose 2013 debut LP WILDEWOMAN (Mom + Pop) is lauded by The New York Times as "an art school take on girl group soul."

Hailed by The Boston Globe as "the most welcome addition to pop music this year" WILDEWOMAN ¬¬has landed on numerous critics' year-end best of lists. Ranked #25 by Amazon, admired by Paste for its "strong song structures, substantive lyrics and precise playing" and included in NPR's top 50 albums of 2013, Lucius pairs the synchronous vocals of Wolfe and Laessig, who play synth and keyboards, with guitars and drums from Dan Molad, Peter Lalish and Andrew Burri. Together, they make music that evokes classic girl-group pop and iconic rock 'n' roll with a modern twist, that belongs solely to Lucius. But none of it happened overnight.

"We've been singing together for almost nine years," Wolfe says. "We never wanted to rush anything. We never looked for a record deal before it felt like we needed one, and we never wanted to be on tour until we felt like we could sustain ourselves on the road. It was important for us to hone our craft."

Wolfe and Laessig met in college in Boston, bonding over a love of old-school soul, David Bowie and the Beatles. They sing as though each is one half of the same voice, with riveting, resonant unison parts on songs like "Hey Doreen," the propulsive first single from WILDEWOMAN; and harmonies that feel instinctive as their voices diverge and then meld together on the ineffably catchy title track.

"We started singing in unison because we were always drawn to doubled vocals on recordings," Wolfe says. "We figured it couldn't hurt to try it in a live setting and it just felt like our voices were supposed to be sitting together – an automatic vocal kinship. In truth, many of our intentional decisions, when it comes to sounds and arrangements and even band setup, have been happy accidents."

After their initial musical gathering, the pair started writing songs together, exploring a sense of otherness that each had felt growing up, and pairing it with arresting musical arrangements: from bright acoustic guitars and heartbroken vocals to layers of irresistible rhythm and bold melodies.
"Jess and I have shared unusually parallel experiences," Laessig says. "We were both bullied during adolescence, which lit a fire in each of us. We have both experienced relationships and love on a similar timeline, so when we write songs together we have a natural empathy. The themes that run through this record reflect the struggles and realizations of becoming an adult, and of being a bit of an outsider sometimes, but embracing it. I think that's something people can relate to."

In 2007, Wolfe and Laessig moved to Brooklyn's Ditmas Park, taking up residence at the Bromley House, which had, unbeknownst to them at the time, been a music school and recording studio for more than 60 years prior. Wolfe and Laessig established an open-door policy for the strong local community of musicians. First came Molad, a drummer, producer and engineer whom Lucius sought out for some early recording sessions (he also co-produced WILDEWOMAN). He introduced them to Lalish, his former bandmate in the indie-pop trio Elizabeth and the Catapult. Later, Molad met Burri while working on a different recording project, rounding out the Lucius family.

At the same time, Lucius was developing the memorable visual look the band employs onstage — "dressing the sound," they call it. Taking inspiration from strong visual artists, and citing Bjork, Bowie, Warhol and Prince as style icons, the women are bedecked in a seemingly endless array of identical head-to-toe ensembles, complimented by the men's sharp, tailored style.

Fresh off a year of acclaimed performances and rave reviews, Lucius' steady ascent shows no signs of retreat. 2014 brings Lucius to a worldwide audience with WILDEWOMAN's release in Europe, the UK, Australia and Japan (PIAS, March 2014), plus tour dates throughout the UK and Europe, appearances on some of the biggest U.S. summer festivals and more.

Trampled by Turtles

Trampled By Turtles formed in 2003 in Duluth, Minnesota. From their beginnings on the Midwestern festival circuit, they have reached new heights with each album. The release of 2012’s Stars And Satellites saw the band play to more fans than ever, sell close to 100,000 albums, make their first national television appearance on The Late Show With David Letterman, and have their first concert feature, Live at First Avenue, broadcast on Palladia. This year, the band will once again headline Red Rocks Amphitheatre in addition to holding their second annual Festival Palomino in the fall.

On Wild Animals, Trampled by Turtles’ seventh studio album, themes of impermanence run deep, both lyrically and sonically. The quintet’s hybrid folk sound continues its evolution pushing the band further into the grey area between genres that defies pigeonholing.

Lead songwriter Dave Simonett has been especially affected by change over the last few years. He relocated from Duluth to the city of Minneapolis. “When I lived in Duluth, I think I took connection with uncivilized nature for granted. There, I had to drive 20 minutes and I was in the middle of nowhere, and I did this almost daily,” says Simonett. “This was a very important ritual for me. Solitary time in a nearly untouched landscape is my version of church, so I think there is a bit of loss of religion in a lot of my work these days. I’ve always been a little obsessed with our struggle to stay connected to our simple animal side, the part of our nature that lived off the earth, hunted live game, worshipped trees and mountains. I believe a lot of sadness is caused by feeling disconnected with the rest of nature. A lot of what is instinctual for us is beaten down and frowned upon in modern society. It has to be confusing for the subconscious.”

Wild Animals found Trampled by Turtles working with a producer for the first time in four studio records. The band placed themselves in the capable hands of longtime Duluth, MN compatriot Alan Sparhawk of the band Low and engineer B.J. Burton (Poliça, Megafaun, Volcano Choir) who crafted a sonic landscape that was spatial and new at Cannon Falls, MN’s Pachyderm Studio (Nirvana, The Jayhawks).

Says Simonett on working with Sparhawk: “Alan is one of the most musically courageous people I know and that’s exactly the attitude we were looking for. He’s great at taking a song from its false conclusion all the way down to its very core and then building it back in new and interesting ways.”

And on Burton’s contributions: “He has an exciting way of looking at sound. He shares Alan’s courage in music in that he’s ready to take organic sounds and push them to new places. He’s extremely technically skilled but not tied to any recording dogma.”

Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue

Since the release of their Grammy®-nominated 2010 debut album, Backatown, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue have grown creatively while winning hordes of new fans performing nonstop on five continents. Their new album, For True (Sept. 13 on Verve Forecast), offers substantive proof of their explosive growth, further refining the signature sound Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews has dubbed "Supafunkrock."

"There was excitement from everywhere," says Andrews (who's now 25) of the experience on the road and how it fed into the creation of For True. "We did over 200 shows in the last year and a half, and every night we allowed the music to take us over. Musically and creatively, we wanted to shoot for some different things."

The band - Mike Ballard on bass, Pete Murano on guitar, Joey Peebles on drums, Dwayne Williams on percussion, Dan Oestreicher on baritone sax and Tim McFatter on tenor sax - stirs together old-school New Orleans jazz, funk and soul, laced with hard-rock power chords and hip-hop beats, and they've added some tangy new ingredients on For True as they keep pushing the envelope, exploring new musical territory.

"We never sat down and really thought about concepts and what we wanted our music to sound like," Andrews explains. "It's just that, over the years, we allowed each one of the band members to bring their influences and taste in music into our music. Anything we hear or are influenced by, it naturally comes out in what we're trying to do. It's just our sound, and it happened naturally."

Andrews wrote or co-wrote all 14 tracks on the new album, including collaborating with the legendary Lamont Dozier on "Encore," while this time playing as much trumpet as trombone, as well as organ, drums, piano, keys, synth bass and percussion. Indeed, he played every part on the swaying, Latin-tinged "Unc." He's also come into his own as a singer, honoring the hallowed legacy of the great soul men of the 1960s and '70s. Like its predecessor, the new album turns on a rare combination of virtuosity and high-energy, party-down intensity.

Among the special guests are longtime NOLA cohorts like Ivan and Cyril Neville (who bring their trademark sound to "Nervis"); Galactic's Ben Ellman, reprising his producer's role on Backatown (percussion on opener "Buckjump," harmonica on "Big 12") and Stanton Moore (drumming on "Lagniappe Part 1" and "Part 2"); bounce rapper 5th Ward Weebie and the Rebirth Brass Band (who team up on "Buckjump") and Troy's longtime friend Charles Smith (who adds percussion to the same track).

"On the last record, we just basically did it with my band," Andrews points out, "but we've got a lot of New Orleans people on this new record - the music just called for it. The Rebirth Brass Band, these are all people that helped me grow in my career and teach me different things. And 5th Ward Weebie, who's one of the lead voices in the bounce community, we're like brothers. I'm excited to have those people on there, because they bring a taste of where I come from and where I'm going."

The album also bears the fruit of more recent relationships Lenny Kravitz (who plays bass on "Roses"), has the longest-standing bond with Andrews, discovering the then-teenage prodigy in 2005 and taking him on tour with his band. Calling Andrews "a genius player," Kravitz says, "He's got nothing but personality, he plays his ass off and he's a beautiful human being." Kid Rock (whose vocal is featured on "Mrs. Orleans") came out to see Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue at an outdoor show early this year in NOLA, and a month later Troy joined the star onstage at Jazz Fest. Andrews played with Warren Haynes (whose eruptive solo further heats up "Encore") at his annual benefit and again at the guitarist's Mahalia Jackson Theatre all-star event during this year's Jazz Fest. Ledisi (who sings on "Then There Was You"), met Troy at the 2010 Grammys, later came out to see him in New Orleans and was later featured in a segment for the landmark "Red Hot + New Orleans" at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, for which Andrews served as musical director.

His relationship with Jeff Beck (check out his blistering solo on "Do to Me") has blossomed since the guitar legend came to Troy's late-night post-Jazz Fest show at Tipitina's in 2010. "I was completely blown away," Beck said of his Tip's epiphany in Mojo magazine's "The Best Thing I've Heard All Year" special feature in January. "The crowd went wild. Troy and his band have just supported me on some U.K. dates. A sensational group of musicians. Trombone Shorty is one to watch." That led Beck to ask Andrews to play on Jeff Beck's "Rock 'N' Roll Party Honoring Les Paul," and Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue joined Beck for his U.K. tour last fall.

"I'm fans of all those people," says Andrews. "I met them over the last year or two of touring, and I've been wanting to work with all of those guys and Ledisi. It's like this musical community. It's not like I reached out to them because I needed some big names on the record. I'm really interested in their music and their talents. So for me it's a dream come true to work with some of my favorite artists. Whatever they need me to do, I'll be there."

Since Backatown's release, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue have toured nonstop in North America, the U.K., Brazil, Japan, Europe and Australia. Last December, Andrews drew accolades as musical director of "Red Hot + New Orleans" at BAM. The sensational two-night run inspired The New York Times senior music critic Jon Pareles to assert, "Trombone Shorty had clearly set out to present New Orleans as a city whose glory days aren't over... it was a signal that the city's music would push ahead."

Yes, Andrews has made quite an impression on the critics. "Trombone Shorty is so ready for his close-up," The New York Times reviewer Nate Chinen wrote, describing the young virtuoso as "a native prodigy destined for breakout success." The San Francisco Chronicle's Joel Selvin hailed him as "New Orleans' brightest new star in a generation." Rolling Stone's Will Hermes raved that "Backatown is both deeply rooted and culturally omnivorous." And the Washington Post's Mike Joyce described one live performance as "a near-deafening, funk-charged blast of percussion, brass, reeds and guitar distortion that might have knocked the crowd sideways had there been any room to move."

TSOA's performances at and during the New Orleans Jazz Fest are legendary. This year, in one day, Troy sat in for a set of free jazz honoring a recently passed mentor. From there he sat in with Kid Rock. Then to the Gospel Tent for a featured slot with cousin Glenn David Andrews before literally running back to the main stage to close the Festival as a special guest of the Neville Brothers. His respect across a broad spectrum and his musical versatility is further evidenced by his performance resumé, playing at events as diverse as Bonnaroo, the Playboy Jazz Festival at Hollywood Bowl, the Montreal, Montreux and Monterey jazz fests, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass in San Francisco, Austin City Limits, Fuji Rock in Japan, Philadelphia Folk Fest, Jam Cruise, assorted Blues Festivals and even a Reggae Festival in Germany. The band spent the month of July crisscrossing Europe to perform at festivals from Spain to Slovakia. Andrews has also done a ton of TV, appearing on The Late Show With David Letterman, The Tonight Show With Jay Leno, Jimmy Kimmel Live, Good Morning America, Tavis Smiley, NFL Kickoff (joining Dave Matthews Band) and a recurring role on the hit HBO series Tremé, on which he played himself in a recurring role. Along with appearing on Beck's Les Paul tribute, he's been a featured guest musician on the latest releases from Eric Clapton, Kravitz, Galactic and Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars.

Andrews hails from the Tremé neighborhood in New Orleans' 6th Ward, getting his nickname at four years old when he was observed by his older brother James marching in a street parade wielding a trombone twice as long as the kid was high. Troy started early, learning how to play drums and what he remembers as "the world's smallest trumpet" at the age of three. By the time he reached six, this prodigy was playing trumpet and trombone in a jazz band led by his older brother James, himself a trumpet player of local renown who has been called "Satchmo of the Ghetto."

Not long afterward, Troy formed his own band with some other musically inclined kids from Tremé, including current band mate Williams, and they became regulars at Jackson Square, with dreams of following in the footsteps of his brother James and Rebirth Brass Band, learning and carrying on the New Orleans tradition. While not only carrying on that tradition and expanding its boundaries, Troy has lent a generous helping hand to the next generation as well, having given longstanding support to the city's renowned Roots of Music program. Troy was also recently honored by being named the youngest member of the NOCCA Foundation board - the foundation behind New Orleans' Center for the Creative Arts where Troy and several of his band members studied and began collaborating. He's also finalizing plans for his own new foundation aimed at making sure that talented younger players with limited resources can get quality instruments to play. Starting in September, he'll be delivering Trombone Shorty trumpets and trombones to talented young musicians across the city.

Dave Alvin & Phil Alvin with The Guilty Ones

DAVE ALVIN & PHIL ALVIN RECORD FIRST ALBUM TOGETHER IN 30 YEARS: 'COMMON GROUND: DAVE ALVIN + PHIL ALVIN PLAY AND SING THE SONGS OF BIG BILL BROONZY' OUT JUNE 3 ON YEP ROC

"We argue sometimes, but we never argue about Big Bill Broonzy," says Dave Alvin when explaining why he and brother Phil, who haven't made an album together in almost 30 years, were inspired to record 'Common Ground: Dave Alvin + Phil Alvin Play and Sing the Songs of Big Bill Broonzy' set for June 3 release on Yep Roc. The Alvin brothers, who founded seminal early LA punk roots band The Blasters in 1979, have shared a fascination with Broonzy since childhood. After an illness nearly took Phil's life in 2012, they resolved to return to the studio and pay tribute to the blues legend.

'Common Ground' includes 12 songs that capture a 30-year cross section of Broonzy's canon, performed by the Alvins' in their signature style of rollicking roots and stomping country blues. Billboard has the premiere of album track "All By Myself" and an exclusive Q&A here

"He looked so slick," says Phil about the cover of his first Broonzy album, which he purchased in a department store at age 12. Dave agrees, "I remember the day Phil brought that record home. It's a strong childhood memory – like stealing a Playboy for the first time."

The Alvins' interpretations of Big Bill range from faithful to loose and Dave and Phil both play guitar and sing. They are joined on some tracks by Dave's band members Lisa Pankratz (drums) and Brad Fordham (bass) as well as The Blasters' pianist Gene Taylor. Other tracks feature noted session musicians Bob Glaub (bass) and Don Heffington (drums). All tracks were recorded at Winslow Court Studios in Los Angeles, CA.

Though this is their first album together in decades, the Alvin brothers collaborated last year on 'Ghost Brothers of Darkland County,' the critically acclaimed "southern gothic supernatural musical" by Stephen King, John Mellencamp and T Bone Burnett. They also sang a duet on "What's Up With Your Brother" for Dave's last Yep Roc release 'Eleven/Eleven.'

Dave and Phil will tour extensively in 2014, including dates with the popular Roots on Rails series in April. A Record Store Day exclusive release of four songs from 'Common Ground' cut at 45RPM on two 10-inch records packaged as a 78-style album book will also be available via Yep Roc on April 19.

Hurray for the Riff-Raff

Hurray for the Riff Raff is Alynda lee Segarra, a 25 year old Puerto Rican from the Bronx. After leaving home at an early age to travel the country, she eventually settled in New Orleans where she began to perform and record with a revolving cast of musicians. She released two records (2008's It Don't Mean I Don't Love You and 2010's Young Blood Blues) mostly consisting of delicate folk and country songs. In 2011, the UK record label Loose Music (Felice Brothers, Dawes, Deer Tick), released Hurray for the Riff Raff, an album that collected the best songs from those records. The Times of London named Hurray for the Riff Raff one of the Top Ten Albums of 2011. Phil Alexander, the Editor-in-Chief of Mojo Magazine, raved that they "have immense potential and seductive power" and named them second best band at SXSW 2011.


Back in the States, Alynda met up with a young honky-tonk band called the Tumbleweeds, just as she began to expand her musical palette to include rock n roll, pop, and soul. In the tradition of Bob Dylan with Band and Neil Young with Crazy Horse, Alynda recruited the Tumbleweeds to be her touring band, drastically altering the sound of Hurray for the Riff Raff.

Look Out Mama is the result of almost two years of Alynda and the Tumbleweeds criss-crossing the USA, playing over 100 shows in small bars and clubs. Recorded in Nashville by producer Andrija Tokic (Alabama Shakes), Look Out Mama is an exploration of classic American music as interpreted by Alynda lee Segarra. From the Swamp Pop of "Little Black Star" to the Classic Country of "Look Out Mama", to the Psychedelia of "Ode to John and Yoko" and even the Surf-Rock of "Lake of Fire", Look Out Mama covers a wide array of musical ground, with every song unified by Alynda's soulful vocals and expert songwriting.

Puss'n'Boots (featuring Norah Jones, Sasha Dobson and Catherine Popper)

Puss N Boots (Norah Jones, Sasha Dobson and Catherine Popper) are talking, switching instruments, making people feel awkward, and laughing. And also dogs.

Ana Tijoux is a critically acclaimed hip-hop artist who's hit song "1977" has become a fan-favorite, featured in 'Breaking Bad' and EA Sports' 'FIFA'. Born in France to Chilean parents during a time of political exile, her family moved to Chile after the return to democracy, where Tijoux found a home in the emerging hip-hop scene. Her collaboration with Mexican pop rock star Julieta Venegas on the track "Eres Para Mi" helped expose Tijoux to a mainstream audience after the song became a television and radio hit across Latin America and the United States. Major accolades for her solo album, 1977, came from notable music writers at The New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, SPIN and Associated Press. Latin Grammy and Grammy nominations for the landmark album came quickly and catapulted Tijoux into international stardom. Armed with her new album, "Vengo," to be released on Nacional Records on March 18, Tijoux will be fresh from her SXSW showcase to share new material and classics with her L.A. fans eagerly awaiting her return to the city..
Subsuelo is a global bass dance and visual arts collective featuring resident DJs Gozar, Ethos, Gazoo and Canyon Cody and live flamenco band with La Tigresa, Gabriel Osuna and Gerardo Morales plus visuals by Juxli and photography by Farah Sosa. Based in Boyle Heights, Subsuelo is leading an eastside renaissance by taking on traditional Latin music, heavy-hitting club anthems, avant-garde electronica, orthodox hip-hop and experimental flamenco for a retro-futuristic party rooted in the past and moving towards the future. The group has collaborated with some heavy hitters, including Toy Selectah, Novalima, Nickodemus, Mexican Institute of Sound, Los Rakas, Nortec Collective, Money Mark (Beastie Boys), 2Mex, Eric Bobo (Cypress Hill), Nu-Mark (Jurassic 5) and more.

The James Hunter Six

A native of Colchester, England, James Hunter fell in love with Soul and R&B music early on. Later, he cut his chops playing clubs and the festival circuits in England. He's also toured extensively with Van Morrison, singing alongside greats like John Lee Hooker, Junior Wells, Jimmy Witherspoon and Georgie Fame. Still, as oddly familiar as James Hunter may "sound" upon first listen, he actually pays loving homage to all the Soul greats ... unlike any other.

Heather Maloney + Darlingside

" 'Woodstock' is delicious, really excellent. I’m certain that Joni would enjoy this wonderfully heartfelt version of her classic song" - Graham Nash, Crosby Stills Nash and Young

Heather Maloney and Darlingside have teamed up for their first collaborative release. The Woodstock E.P. features two new originals from Maloney and two new ones from Darlingside, along with their cover of Joni Mitchell’s “Woodstock.” Heather Maloney and Darlingside independently began their musical careers in late 2009 in Northampton, MA, crossing paths only through overlapping posters pinned up on cork boards across town and occasional side-by-side blurbs in local music rags. Buoyed by the same robust arts scene of the Pioneer Valley, both artists grew from regional headliners to nationally touring acts in a few short years. In November of 2013, Maloney and Darlingside teamed up for a tour out to the Midwest, and it did not take long for them to realize that they had stumbled upon a powerful combination. A feature in the New York Times of their cover of Joni Mitchell's “Woodstock” soon followed, and fans of both artists are now eagerly anticipating their next collaboration: a joint E.P. to be released by Signature Sounds on March 11th.

Poor Old Shine

Poor Old Shine is a roots band with a grassroots ethos. The Connecticut quintet prizes the human element that underpins their music, from songwriting to recording to album design and even choice of record label: Poor Old Shine released its self-titled debut studio LP, recorded with Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Joy Kills Sorrow), Nov. 5 on Signature Sounds.
"You can't have music without people, whether it's electronic music or the oldest Delta blues players," singer and banjo player Chris Freeman says. "The people behind it are really important, and we always want to make sure that everything we do feels handcrafted and pure."

Purity is subject to interpretation, of course, but the term certainly describes the band's motives. Formed at the University of Connecticut, where Freeman met banjo and mandolin player Antonio Alcorn in a folk music club on campus, an early version of Poor Old Shine landed its first gig—opening for a friend's band at the legendary New Haven club Toad's Place—before the musicians had even decided what to call themselves. "We came up with our name a few hours before the show," Freeman says. "It was a lot of fun and we figured, we might as well get another gig, and it went on like that for another year or so."

With the addition Max Shakun on guitar and pump organ and Harrison Goodale on bass, the band began writing songs influenced by Pete Seeger, vintage bluegrass and bands like the Avett Brothers; recording a pair of self-released EPs and spending time on the road. Poor Old Shine played live shows before increasingly appreciative audiences in renowned venues, including the Kennedy Center for the Arts in Washington D.C., Club Passim in Cambridge, Mass., Rockwood Music Hall in New York and Infinity Hall in Norfolk, Conn., where the musicians recorded a live album in 2012. After capturing the band's onstage sound on the live LP, the group wanted to push themselves into new territory on Poor Old Shine. They found a ready collaborator in Kassirer, whose Great North Sound Society studio in Maine lends itself to focused creativity.

"It's about 40 minutes from the nearest grocery store," Freeman says. "There's no cellphone service, there's no Internet, it's like it's totally closed off from the world, and we really wanted to make that feeling that we had there come across on the album." You can hear it in the sound of a cricket and creaking door hinge that open the atmospheric ballad "Ghosts Next Door," and the dusty thump of a kick drum on the lovelorn "Empty Rocking Chair." Not all the songs are somber, though. Opener "Weeds or Wildflowers" is a joyous, celebratory number with beautiful close harmonies, while the mandolin-fueled rambling tune "Right Now" has a soaring, anthemic feel. "We wouldn't have been able to make the album that we made without exploring that traditional bluegrass sound, but we were really excited to also experiment," Freeman said.

It paid off: Poor Old Shine one of the most exciting roots albums of the year, from a self-assured young band that's just now hitting its stride—and worked hard to get there. "The last two years feel very surreal and it's hard to imagine what will come next," Freeman says. "We're just really excited by the opportunities we've had and the artists we've gotten to meet. We just want to keep living this dream."

The Iguanas

The word "Americana" gets tossed around rather loosely these days; it can mean anything from a hipster with a recently-discovered acoustic guitar to a decades-long denizen of the Grand Ole Opry. But when you set aside the Johnny-come-rootly types from the real deal, it's a sure bet that you're going to stray into Iguana territory. Based out of New Orleans for the past couple of decades – save for a short, Katrina-imposed exile in Austin – the Iguanas define a sound of Americana that crosses cultures, styles, eras… and even languages.Their latest album, Sin to Sin, is their first studio recording since 2008's If You Should Ever Fall on Hard Times, and its release coincides with their appearance at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. "The title for the new album," says sax player/vocalist Joe Cabral, "comes from one of the tracks we cut during the sessions that didn't make it onto the record." At this point, the band's guitarist and vocalist Rod Hodges picks up the trail. "It's a line from a tune called 'Blues for Juarez,'" he says, "that goes, 'We rode the back roads from sin to sin.'" The Iguanas' two-decade road may not exactly have driven them from sin to sin, but it's taken them all over the map, both figuratively and literally. While bassist René Coman is the only member of the band who is a
native of the Crescent City, a languid swampiness so deeply suffuses their sound that you can almost smell the peanut shells on the floor. But there's far more depth to it than the N'Awlins patina that rests, sometimes lightly, sometimes heavily, on anything the city touches. It's almost as if the Iguanas dragged sand up from Juarez and mud from the Mississippi Delta, threw them both into the white-hot crucible of rock, and built their foundation from there, with drummer Doug Garrison anchoring their sound deep in the groove. "Spanish was spoken around the house when I was growing up," says Cabral, "but I was listening to all kinds of stuff: Herb Alpert, Boots Randolph, country music, rock, polkas… The area of south Omaha where I grew up was the classic American blue collar ethnic melting pot of Irish, Italians, Poles, Mexican-Americans, who all sort of brought these pieces into the mix." "How could we not wind up in New Orleans?" asks Rod Hodges, a little rhetorically. "I mean, at Tipitina's they might have Doug Sahm one night and Fela Kuti the next." And sure enough, even on their first album (The Iguanas, Margaritaville/MCA 1993), the band was comfortable planting Allen Toussaint's oft-covered "Fortune Teller" cheek-by-jowl with cumbia master Celso Piña's "Por Mi Camino (Along My Way)," leading Entertainment Weekly to conclude, "never have accordions and saxophones been so much in love." People echoed that sentiment in their review of Nuevo Boogaloo (Margaritaville/MCA 1994), saying "any group that can turn on a dime from a gorgeous R&B ballad like "Somebody Help Me" to the steamy tropical funk of "La Tentación" is clearly here to
stay. And stay they have, through half a dozen studio albums, countless tours and JazzFest appearances, and a
flood that did it's best to take their adopted city with it. It's a testament to the band's longevity and endurance that
they're still configured pretty much the way they were 20 years ago, while their onetime label, MCA, has gone the
way of mousse-abused coiffures and Hammer pants.
Joe Cabral is pretty philosophical about the band's persistence in the face of challenges that would have felled – indeed, have felled – lesser bands. "First of all, this is all we know how to do; we're musicians. But more than that," he continues, "we respect the power of the band as an entity, and each individual in the band steps up to play his part. When it's good, that's really what it's all about. Rod Hodges agrees. "I don't want to get all heady and mystical about this, but it's not really an outward reward we're looking for. We still all enjoy playing music, we all get along, and finding a group of people who can say that after all this time is a pretty rare thing."

The Lone Bellow

Playing what they call "Brooklyn country music," the Lone Bellow (lead singer and songwriter Zach Williams, singer and mandolin player Kanene Dohehey Pipkin, and singer/guitarist Brian Elmquist) are a group of transplanted Southerners who deliver a passionate, soulful, acoustic-based alternative rock Americana. The band began after Williams' wife was involved in a serious accident that left her temporarily paralyzed from the neck down. While hoping and waiting for her recovery (she did recover), Williams began writing a set of haunting songs that dealt with tragedy, hope, and redemption. Following her recovery, the couple moved to Brooklyn. In 2010, Williams, who had been working as a solo act, began jamming with Elmquist, an old friend, and when Pipkin joined in, the trio knew it had a band. Building on Williams' songs, and now working and writing together, they built up an impressive early catalog of songs. Initially the band was known as Zach Williams & the Lone Bellow, but by the time the group's accomplished and powerful debut album from Descendant Records appeared early in 2013, the self-titled The Lone Bellow, Williams had dropped his name from the billing, and the band had grown to include Ben Mars on bass, Brian Murphy on keyboards, Matt Knapp on lap steel and electric guitar, Jason Pipkin on banjo and mandolin, and Brian Griffin on drums.

The Dirty Dozen Brass Band

In 1977, the Dirty Dozen Social and Pleasure Club in New Orleans began showcasing a traditional Crescent City brass band. It was a joining of two proud, but antiquated, traditions at the time: social and pleasure clubs dated back over a century to a time when black southerners could rarely afford life insurance, and the clubs would provide proper funeral arrangements. Brass bands, early predecessors of jazz as we know it, would often follow the funeral procession playing somber dirges, then once the family of the deceased was out of earshot, burst into jubilant dance tunes as casual onlookers danced in the streets. By the late '70s, few of either existed. The Dirty Dozen Social and Pleasure Club decided to assemble this group as a house band, and over the course of these early gigs, the seven-member ensemble adopted the venue's name: the Dirty Dozen Brass Band.

Thirty years later, the Dirty Dozen Brass Band is a world famous music machine, whose name is synonymous with genre-bending romps and high-octane performances. They have revitalized the brass band in New Orleans and around the world, progressing from local parties, clubs, baseball games and festivals in their early years to touring nearly constantly in the U.S. and in over 30 other countries on five continents. The Dirty Dozen have been featured guests on albums by artists including David Bowie, Elvis Costello, Dr. John and the Black Crowes. The city of New Orleans even has an official Dirty Dozen Brass Band Day.

The Shinolas Revue, featuring Chris Collingwood (Fountains of Wayne), Freedy Johnston & Syd Straw

The Shinolas Revue finds these super-talented Hartford-based stalwarts playing with 3 unique luminaries of the indie-pop world:

CHRIS COLLINGWOOD fronts Grammy-nominated power-pop geniuses FOUNTAINS OF WAYNE.
FREEDY JOHNSTON ("Bad Reputation") is a brilliant midwest-based songwriter with 11 albums to his credit and an incredible lyrical gift.
SYD STRAW is a NYC underground legend (Golden Palominos) who has sung on more people's albums than stars in the sky, has a voice that will send chills down your spine and has several amazing albums.
THE SHINOLAS: Formed in 2009, Hartford area musical luminaries Jim Chapdelaine (gtrs), Lorne Entress (drums), Paul Kochanski (bass), and Ed Iarusso (pedal steel), bring a wealth of experience and know-how to their Roots/Americana band The Shinolas. Members have recorded or performed with none other than Les Paul, Phoebe Snow, Lori McKenna, Big Al Anderson, Charlie Musselwhite, Mike Love, Susan Tedeschi, Jon Pousette Dart, Mighty Sam McClain, Catie Curtis, Mark Erelli, Bruce Katz, Vance Gilbert, Ellis Paul, Ronnie Earl, Feathermerchants, Junior Wells, Kim Wilson, Fancy Trash, The Nields, Dave Carter & Tracy Grammer, Henry Butler, Duke Levine, Kris Delmhorst, Erin McKeown, The Story, Swinging Steaks, Ollabelle, and numerous others. And if that weren’t enough, Jim has won twelve (and counting) Emmys composing soundtracks for CPTV.

Over a get-to-know-each-other cup of coffee in 2008, Jim and Lorne came up with the idea of a local off-night residency in the Hartford area--a musical project close to home that would provide a chance to tap into their mutual love for American roots music. The Shinolas “draw their material from the Great American Songbook, an eclectic canon of rock and roll, blues, folk and vintage country music that spans decades. It's not uncommon to hear the band jamming to songs by Merle Haggard, Ryan Adams, Johnny Cash and Neil young.” (Hartford Courant) With Ed and Paul on board the band gelled quickly, winning the Best Country Band of 2009 in the Hartford Advocate. (although pure Country is just a slice of what they do.)

With their impressive individual resumes, The Shinolas are a band with a bonus – you never know who’ll join them on stage for a tune or two, or even a whole show. Guests have included, NRBQ’s Big Al Anderson, Fountains of Wayne’s singer Chris Collingwood, Freedy Johnston, Pat Dinizio of The Smithereens, country star Gary Burr, Jon Pousette Dart, Mark Erelli, Rani Arbo, Roy Sludge with Duke Levine, and a host of others.

And the Kids

Recently called one of "the Western Mass. indie scenes brightest creative lights" by Pitchfork, Northampton, Massachusetts’ And the Kids recently released their debut full-length album, Turn to Each Other (Signature Sounds).Turn to Each Other is more than an album title: it’s a statement of fact for the band, whose bond — as musicians, friends and creative foils — is as tight as they come. The album features 11 tracks full of ringing guitars from Hannah Mohan, knotty rhythms from drummer Rebecca Lasaponaro and bold accents from synthesizers and percussion by Megan Miller.Together, they create "apocaplyptic pop", a dizzying stop-start ride with lush, intricate soundscapes that frame Mohan’s lively lead vocals. NPR Music recently raved, "Guitarist Hannah Mohan's striking vocals rival the vibrato and boldness of Siouxsie Sioux... [And The Kids] make music that's both fearless and entertaining."

Grant-Lee Phillips

"History and legend have often found their way into my songs" reflects Grant-Lee Phillips. "But sometimes, I don't have to look quite so far to find inspiration." Walking in the Green Corn is the newest album by Grant-Lee Phillips. Its ten songs are drawn from Phillips' intensive investigations into his native lineage. Phillips, who is Muskogee (Creek), elliptically explores the intersection of past and present, personal and political. While the songs delve deeply into the subconscious mystery of his own backstory, they simultaneously reveal the resonance and insight of ancient myth in parallel to contemporary man's emotions, actions, and errors.

Composed in a concentrated burst over the course of a few winter months, Walking in the Green Corn came about almost too quickly to censor—the unfiltered sum of years of rumination and discovery. As the days became shorter, the nocturnal Phillips became more productive. "I'm pretty good in the morning," he says, a smile emerging, "which for me is about 2pm. I find that in a half-awake state, I can make a little bit of headway. Then I become more conscious as the day goes on…I have to wait until the evening and the rest of the world has quieted down to resume."

What initially began as off-the-cuff home recordings, designed to capture the songs at the moment of conception, soon took on a life of its own. "Initially I figured that, somewhere down the road, I'd get some musicians together in a cathedral-like space and re-record these songs," Phillips explains. But the disarmingly warm, bioluminescent quality of his simple home recordings had the certain weathered elegance that, in Phillips' words, "would have driven me mad if I attempted to recreate them in a professional studio environment."

With the exception of violin and vocals by Sara Watkins (formerly of Nickel Creek) and an understated vibraphone part by Alexander Burke, everything on Walking in the Green Corn was performed, sung, and engineered by Phillips. "I do my best work when nobody's paying attention – including myself," he recalls. "That's what happened: it really snuck up on me. By the end of the year, I had most of the album written and recorded. Little by little I'd play the songs back for my wife Denise (Siegel), on long drives up the San Joaquin Valley. She's an artist and writer with uncanny ears and instincts. She kept me aimed in the right direction, brought a lot of objectivity to the project. Denise was my co-producer here."

The mix of euphoria, wonder, and caution brought about by fatherhood—a heady emotional cocktail that fueled Phillips last album, the critically lauded Little Moon—also played a hand in this project, as his thoughts turned to his own mixed heritage. He has always found his ancestry, which encompasses both Native American peoples and European settlers, to be a fertile source. "Connecting to my ancestry is like having this deep trunk that's embedded in the earth, with deep roots. It was always something that was important to my grandmother, who was Creek, and to my mother. "So, after becoming a father, I wanted to be able to answer all those questions I know I'll be asked one day, when my daughter takes an interest in where we come from."

The opening "Vanishing Song" functions equally as an ode to rediscovering the ancient songs of his forefathers and as a longing for a purity and wisdom long corrupted by modern man's material lust. A similar theme pervades "Fool's Gold," of which Phillips says, "Perhaps there is no other kind of gold. Look what it does to us, look how it drives people mad. Look how it drove a whole nation westward and all the suffering that came with it."

Exploring timeless myths and rituals also lead Phillips to discover a certain palpable awe and majesty in life around him that mirrors his ancient inspirations. The loping "Grey Horned Owl" celebrates a beast long associated with insight and wisdom, equating its constancy and calm strength with the unwavering dedication of a devoted partner.
"Thunderbird," perhaps the album's most stark and intimate performance, finds Phillips overwhelmed by the mighty bird of myth—and equally enchanted with the mysteries and uncertainties of earthly attraction.

Since first emerging in the early '90s as the front-man and songwriter of the internationally acclaimed trio Grant Lee Buffalo, Phillips has been drawn to the conflicts at the heart of the American experience. The resulting body of work, which consists of four GLB albums and six uniquely divergent solo albums, has placed Phillips among
the most revered and admired songwriters of his generation. His post-GLB career in particular has found him exploring a wide range of palettes and textures, from the roiling synthscapes of Mobilize to the rootsy clarity of the pedal steel-laced Virginia Creeper.

Walking in the Green Corn shares an elemental purity and richness with Virginia Creeper, but further pairs down both the performances and the compositions. "It comes down to the purest form of expression that I can offer," Phillips explains. "I have to get off on my own, allow myself to disappear to do my best work."

Walking in the Green Corn comes together as an evocative penetration into our own troubled era. And yet, the album's optimistic title track completes the album on a meditative, redemptive note—implying that the potential for change and betterment is within reach, and that perhaps the best solutions can be found by looking backwards
and forward simultaneously.

Lady Lamb The Beekeeper

More than anything, Aly Spaltro has 20,000 second-hand DVDs to thank for her first album. Despite being recorded at a proper studio in her recently adopted home of Brooklyn, Ripely Pine showcases songs conceived during her tenure at Bart's & Greg's DVD Explosion in Brunswick, Maine. Little did customers know, the same store they'd drop off their Transformers movies was providing the ideal four-year cocoon for the development of a major musical talent.

Aly worked the 3pm-11pm shift. Each night, after locking up, she'd walk past Drama and Horror, pull out her music gear from behind a wall of movies, and write and record songs until morning broke. She did this every day, drawing strength from the monotony of her routine.

During those nightly creative spells, Spaltro tested out multiple techniques, approaches and instrumentation. She brought whatever state she was in that day to the music, which served as raw expressions of her lyrical thoughts. Anger, confusion, love, happiness, and sadness reigned, and the songs ran rampant, with little form or structure. Isolated for those many hours, Aly let melodies morph together, break apart, and pair up. This is how she taught herself to write music and sing.

Spaltro chose to give herself a band name, because she had only two outlets for giving out her music; Bart's & Greg's, and a record store next door, the beloved independent Bull Moose. She arranged her CDs on the counters as free offerings, and seeing how she was often the employee at the register, didn't tell people it was her music.

That's how Lady Lamb the Beekeeper became one of the most beloved performers in Portland. Her live shows were unhinged, as melodies followed an internal logic only apparent to Spaltro herself. She sang and played guitar, and the songs offered a vivid yet brief snapshot into her expanse world. Their full glory remained in her head for reasons of access and cost. And anyway, who the hell would be able to play along with her, seeing how they followed no formal logic? Thus, she developed as a solo performer, careening from hums to screams within seconds, but always maintaining self-control.

At 23, with five years of taking music seriously under her belt, when she ventured to the next milestone—recording an album. This would be the first time she did so in a professional studio (not just her and her 8-track) and the first time she shared the process with anyone else. Luckily, she met Nadim Issa at Let 'Em Music in Brooklyn. He was taken enough by her abilities to dedicate nine full months towards the recording of Ripely Pine, and she with his producing abilities to ease comfortably into making him a part of her recording process. She wrote everything. All the songs, most of the arrangements. And the two of them assembled an album that finally fit what existed in Spaltro's mind. Keeping the songs' stark rawness, the record is a pure representation of her sound.

Ripely Pine shouts the introduction of a new talent from every groove. Here, finally, are recordings of Lady Lamb that come as close as possible to conveying the intense majestry of her live shows. And, much like her performances live, a narrative breathes through the record's progression. The album opens with urgency and anger, settles into reconciliation and reciprocation, and ultimately reaches towards resolution, realizing infatuation leads to a loss of self; instead, embracing one's own strengths is the most powerful thing of all.

No surprise that Spaltro ultimately sings a mantra of individuality. A listen to Ripely Pine proves she has a lot to say for herself and certainly doesn't need anybody's help to do it.

Collaborating with Issa kind of ruled, though. And it's going to be next to purely awesome seeing her play with a full band.

Lady Lamb the Beekeeper. You. Here. First.

Barnstar!

Barn Star has impeccable hygiene. We have big hats, and really loud high voices. One guy's dad is in the band, which is pretty cool. And most of us are handsome. Well, handsome for bluegrass.

Paul Burch and the WPA Ballclub

Paul Burch, Nashville's honky-tonk auteur and a writer of unmistakably modern but instantly classic songs, will release his new album, Fevers this fall on Plowboy Records. Backed by his redoubtable band the WPA Ballclub, Fevers reveals the side of Burch heard most often on stage—intense, unbridled, and full of bravado. Produced with multi-instrumentalist Fats Kaplin (Jack White, Buddy Miller, Third Man Records), Fevers is a riveting and haunting mix of honky tonk, stringband blues, and bop grooves that defies easy categories.
Critics have praised Burch's albums as "music that sounds thoroughly modern but completely unlike contemporary country" (USA Today) and Entertainment Weekly has called him "a modern day Jimmie Rodgers." The UK's Uncut Magazine has awarded each of Burch's past three albums a five star rating saying: "No one makes records like this anymore."
Born in Washington D.C., Burch was first singled out when his 1996 debut, Pan American Flash, was named Amazon.com's #5 Best Country Albums of the 90s and was described by Billboard's Chet Flippo as "extraordinary…establishing Burch as a leader in marrying country's roots tradition with a modern sensibility."
Along with a GRAMMY nomination for his contribution to the album Charlie Louvin (Charlie Louvin), Burch has worked with a range of equally ineffable artists including: Ralph Stanley, Exene Cervenka of X, Mark Knopfler, Lambchop, Vic Chesnutt, and R&B great Candi Staton. Burch's tribute to Buddy Holly, Words of Love, led to a new fan in Holly's widow, Maria Elena. "Words of Love is a beautiful album," said Maria Elena. "He has everything Buddy wanted to hear in an artist--his own style and his own sound." Burch recently produced famed Nashville songwriter David Olney's Predicting the Past, due in 2014.
In 2013, Burch contributed a song to Hip Hop for Public Health's Songs for a Healthier America, an innovative collaboration between musicians and public health advocates to motivate kids to make healthier exercise and wellness choices. The album is being promoted by First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move campaign and will also be the first official free album released on iTunes September 30.
Peter Guralnick, author of biographies on Elvis Presley (Last Train to Memphis & Careless Love) and Sam Cooke (Dream Boogie) says: "I'm a Paul Burch fan. How could I not be? His music never fails to achieve its purpose, what Sun Records founder Sam Phillips has deemed the unequivocal purpose of every kind of music: to lift up, to deepen, to intensify the spirit of audience and musicians alike."
Look for Fevers on vinyl and CD November 5 on Plowboy Records.

The Deadly Gentlemen

Roll Me, Tumble Me, the Deadly Gentlemen's third album and Rounder Records debut, boasts ten winsome examples of their playfully irreverent, vibrantly rootsy songcraft. Although the Boston-based quintet employs acoustic guitar, banjo, fiddle, mandolin and double bass—a lineup that's usually associated with traditional bluegrass—their music defies conventional genre restrictions, filtering a bottomless assortment of influences through their own decidedly distinctive songwriting sensibility and uncanny instrumental rapport. The result is timelessly resonant music that's rooted in tradition, yet effortlessly contemporary and boundlessly entertaining.

Throughout Roll Me, Tumble Me, such beguilingly melodic, emotionally evocative tunes as "I Fall Back," "Bored of the Raging," "A Faded Star" and "Beautiful's Her Body" match banjoist/vocalist/songwriter Greg Liszt's lilting melodies and pointedly poetic lyrics with his bandmates' eloquent musicianship and unconventional vocal blend to bring his compositions to life, reflecting the unique individual and collective backgrounds that have contributed to the Deadly Gentlemen's evolution from quirky side-project to singular musical force.

Roll Me, Tumble Me also points to the Deadly Gentlemen's rich musical history by reinventing three songs that appeared in very different versions on prior releases: the witty title number and the rousing "Working," both from the band's self-released debut The Bastard Masterpiece; and the bittersweet "It'll End Too Soon," which Liszt originally recorded as a member of the acclaimed alt-bluegrass outfit Crooked Still.

Girls Guns & Glory

Girls Guns & Glory blends a variety of sonic concoctions under the umbrella of Americana. Their country twang mixed with the genuine sentiment of rock and folk captures the attention of all listeners who can appreciate catchy, yet thoughtful tunes.

Drawing off of their varied influences, they smoke through tunes with reckless abandon- swirling together swing jams, crazy punk beats, rockabilly stomps, mariachi trumpets, and tons of other elements that shake you out of your chair and onto the dance floor in a way you can't resist.

All you have to do is listen once, and you'll remember—in case you forgot—and you will know—in case you never knew, Nicole Wray. The honesty, the aching sweetness, the raw power of her voice and the songs will remind you that nothing can move you as much, or touch you as deeply, as that single voice that some how explains your every emotion.

At 17, Nicole was the first artist signed to Missy Elliot's Goldmind Records. In 1998, her debut single, "Make It Hot," would go on to reach certified gold status. Her voice would later lend itself to features and hit singles by Missy Elliott, Cam'ron, Kid Cudi and to The Black Keys' critically acclaimed project, Blackroc. She was then enlisted to lend background vocals on their seventh studio LP, Brothers. The Akron, Ohio duo encouraged Nicole to expand and mature as a vocalist and musician and from this experience rose a Phoenix, rose a Lady.

Lady is Nicole Monique Wray and her band, and also the title of her debut album — the latest from Truth & Soul records. She had no idea linking up with producers Leon Michels and Jeff Silverman (Aloe Blacc, Adele, Jay Z) to write for the latest Lee Fields album would lead to her writing 12 songs for herself and launch a new career with a sound a little like the songs your Mama loved best — and at the same time like nothing you've ever heard before.

"Lady" the album, unites the mellowness and pop flair of 60s soul with the driving beat of hip-hop, and the silky rhythms of modern R&B. Nicole's powerful voice and Truth & Soul's authentic instrumentation unite to create a fresh sound that would reveal all of her stories of growing up and never giving up, of love and friendship, of yearning and losing, bad girls and good hearts.

Since the release of "Lady" the band has gone on a worldwide tour supporting Lee Fields and The Expressions. They have received accolades and praise from the likes of Essence Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Pitchfork and Rolling Stone to name a few. Lady will be on their first headline tour through Europe this fall.

Prepare to take your hat off to Lady. Get ready to fall in love.

Dirty Bourbon River Show

"A circus-like barrage of sound serving as entrance music for a magical mystery tour of whiskey-soaked French Quarter back alleys," – Rory Callais, Offbeat

"Genetically theatrical… appetite-whetting… a snow-globe carnival segueing seamlessly from kazoo- and clarinet-blown circus shenanigans to smooth-croon lounge, and finely fingered folk ballads to banjo hoedowns, jazzy sax solos and staccato piano jams" – Noah Bonaparte-Pais, Gambit Weekly

"Riotous… racuous… swashbuckling sea chanteys, paranoid polkas, and carnival jazz, often in the same song… now that's my kind of party!" – Aaron Lafont, Groovescapes

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