Eagulls, Twin Peaks, Criminal Hygiene

Since forming in 2009, Leeds-based Eagulls have become synonymous with a discontented, disillusioned kind of anger, molded into bullets of post punk that's rife with urgency and aggression.

Brought together by drummer Henry Ruddell and guitarist Mark 'Goldy' Goldsworthy, they were later joined by friends Liam Matthews on guitar and Tom Kelly on bass. After struggling to find a singer that fitted with their vision for the band, they roped in George Mitchell to be their frontman without ever having heard him sing before.

It was a risk that paid off, with their debut single 'Council Flat Blues' written a week after their first rehearsal together. It was an attention-grabbing introduction to the band: A seething cut of vitriolic riffs and barked lyrics about the things that occur in the vicinity of council flats, it announced Eagulls as an uncompromising, invigorating burst of excitement in a musical landscape littered with bands more focused on fashion and nostalgia – a trend the group took aim at in a now infamous open letter posted online.

For a band like Eagulls, touring is their lifeblood, as shown through the relentless bouts of gigging that have coloured their four years together, in between working tedious day jobs in the bars and retail outlets of Leeds together. Booking support slots with the likes of Iceage, Merchandise and Fucked Up they've carved out a reputation for chaotic and confrontational live shows.

Now, following further standalone releases, their debut album is complete and slated for release in early 2014. Finessing the incensed spirit of their early tracks and gigs, it sets its stall out as a heavier, darker and more exhilarating step on from what's come before. 'Nerve Endings', opening track and first taste of the record, encapsulates that in throbbing bass and George hollering "can't find my end" whilst 'Fester-Blister' provides an anthemic streak cutting through a wall of frenetic noise. 'Tough Luck' takes inspiration from outside the punk pool associated with Eagulls, boasting a rumbling Joy Division-esque bassline. It all ends on the searing rush of 'Soulless Youth', which finds George declaring "I never feel fine/They're soulless inside… the soulless youth" with enough bile to make it clear just how he feels about his generation.

"We're all more pessimistic, more jaded, more cynical," explains Goldy of the band's moodier shift. "When you finish uni, you've got optimism and you think everything's going to be alright. You think you'll just take a shit job in a shop and you'll only have to do it for a while but then you're still there a year later…"

It's this frustration and sardonicism that fuels Eagulls and lights a match under their first LP. Though they admit to there being "lighter moments" on the record, on the whole it's a gloomy, overcast affair. Influenced by post-punk and shoegaze (primarily the sonic assaults of My Bloody Valentine) combined with their own background in hardcore bands, it follows their first trip to America earlier this year for SXSW ( a trip the band sacked in their jobs to take) – the catalyst for their signing to US indie label Partisan.

Since their return home, the band have been largely quiet whilst they finished work on the album. "We haven't been able to play as much because we've been in the studio" says Goldy.

With the record now complete and ready for release, expect their own unique brand of mayhem to be lighting up venues around the country as they return to their natural environment of the road to reinforce their abrasive brilliant reputation once more.

Twin Peaks

When 19-year-old Chicagoans Cadien Lake James, Clay Frankel, Connor Brodner, and Jack Dolan finished high school a year ago, they were under the impression that things had to change. They were expected to go to college, and more importantly, had to deal with the reality of breaking up their band, Twin Peaks, which had just started to get some notice. Three of them committed to Evergreen State College in Olympia with the idea of keeping some semblance of the band together, but it was clear that there was a magic the four of them had. All this happened BEFORE a pivotal self-booked, three-week tour in the summer of '12. They had just recorded their debut album, Sunken, in Cadien's basement, hit the road in earnest, and everywhere they went, one thing remained the same. After seeing the energy, power, and exuberance of their live show, people in every town and members of every band they played with urged them to see this thing through. However, real life is rarely so kind or easy. Deposits were paid, dorm rooms reserved, promises made. Cadien, Connor, and Jack were headed north to Olympia.

It's a funny thing how clarity and circumstance can set and reset the table. After one semester at Evergreen, peoples' compliments still ringing in their ears, the self-described "industrious dudes" decided to quit school and give Twin Peaks a fair shake. They returned to Chicago in December, reunited with Clay, and geared up for their SXSW debut. Esquire even gave them a nod as an "Artist to Watch" at SXSW, calling them "A bunch of dirty, precocious underage kids raised on a steady diet of Jay Reatard and their parents' records...Twin Peaks deploy sugary pop hooks with the infectious enthusiasm of a high school punk band." The guys moved back in with their folks, looked into part-time jobs, and began planning the re-write of the first, post-high school chapter of their lives. The feeling was palpable: Things were about to take off.

So here we stand, ready to offer Twin Peaks to the wider world. A record full of the youthful excitement, sure to elicit "oh yeahs," and if you're not a total square, some body movin'. Sunken is out July 9th on Autumn Tone.

Criminal Hygiene

Criminal Hygiene (CRMNL HYGNE) was formed in 2011 over a couple of really good burgers at Olympian Family Restaurant in South Central Los Angeles. Eat lunch there and you might start a band too, its a fucking great establishment. They have Cherry Coke on tap and they are very generous with their Thousand Island dressing, which goes good with anything on the menu. A good vegetarian option is the Avocado Sandwich with fries, a Cherry Coke and a couple things of Thousand Island. Their most famous dish however is the 1/2 Chicken Plate. I had this once with my good friend Grady, we each ordered one to go and ate it on our porch. It was an amazing meal, one of the best ever had by anyone. We each had 2 things of Thousand Island and a Cherry Coke along with it. The description of the plate might sound kind of odd, but it's one of those things that makes sense once you experience it, like mini golf. The base is a nice romaine salad with tomatoes. Right on top is the chicken... one leg and one breast. To the side is a chunk of buttered garlic bread and behind that is a handful of fries. All this is served with a side of salsa and Thousand Island....mmmm. I've also heard amazing things about the various types of face-sized burgers... avocado, avocado w/bacon etc.

$10.00 - $12.00

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Eagulls, Twin Peaks, Criminal Hygiene

Friday, May 30 · Doors 8:00 PM at The Satellite