Wheeler Brothers

Wheeler Brothers

"Long, Hard Road," the first song on the Wheeler Brothers' first album and a title that gives you a pretty good indication of where this Austin, Texas five-piece feels most comfortable. Indeed, although they're five-time Austin Music Awards winners who've never played a hometown gig that hasn't sold out, the Wheelers view the world as one big stage.

"We've always respected the bands that just get out there and work their asses off," says singer-guitarist Nolan Wheeler, who adds that the band's goal this year is to play 200 shows by Christmas. "There's really no better way to create a connection with your audience."

Nor is there any better way to refine your music—to find yourself in it and discover what makes it yours. That's precisely what the Wheeler Brothers—who also include bassist Tyler Wheeler and drummer Patrick Wheeler, along with guitarist Danny Matthews and lap-steel whiz A.J. Molyneaux—have done over the past two years, honing a unique roots-music sound PasteMagazine.com has described as bringing "a bit of the enthusiasm and flavor of The Arcade Fire into their Texas-tinged Americana" and Carson Daly has called "…music at its finest. Rock & roll with a bit of twang…"

 They'll be the first to tell you: Portraits, the group's remarkable debut, arrives steeped in tradition, with a sound as rich as Southern soil with echoes of Willie Nelson and Townes Van Zandt, not to mention more recent trailblazers such as Wilco and Radiohead. (And let's not forget Western swing institution Asleep at the Wheel, whose frontman Ray Benson released Portraits on his Bismeaux Records.)

Mandolin Orange

On Mandolin Orange's third release, This Side Of Jordan, there's a Lightnin' Hopkins lyric, "If fate's an old woodpecker then I'm an old chunk of wood." "I love the imagery that creates," Andrew Marlin, the duo's lyricist says, "You just picture death as this woodpecker that just lands on your shoulder and starts chipping away at you until there's finally nothing left." In 2011 around the release of Mandolin Orange's acclaimed Haste Make/ Hard Hearted Stranger, Marlin had a near fatal accident. "It was scary," Emily Frantz, the other half of the North Carolinian duo says, "But ultimately it brought us together during a time when we needed a nudge in that direction."

This Side Of Jordan is the story of that healing process, with tales of love and loss, told honest and bare. The opener, "House of Stone," quietly fades in with the hush of Frantz's fiddle then Marlin's guitar joins her, blooming. This moment of beauty is a gentle easing into the record that's drenched deep in the traditional music of Southern Appalachia. Since meeting at a local jam in Chapel Hill in 2009, Marlin and Franz have intertwined gospel, folk, and bluegrass but never so seamlessly as now.
Recorded at the Fideltorium in Kernersville, North Carolina with bassist Jeff Crawford and a backing band, This Side Of Jordan still maintains Mandolin Orange's modest aesthetic with pure and calming sounds. It's a fitting juxtaposition to Marlin's undeniable lyricism. Religious faith and fable thread throughout the record with Biblical references used to "convey a different point," Frantz says. "In the south especially, we hear the Bible construed in any and every way to justify people's comforts and discomforts," Marlin further explains, "and it's so frustrating to watch those stories be used to limit people's happiness." This sentiment inspired "Hey Adam," where Marlin and Frantz urge in unison during the chorus, "Our Father loves you all ways."
But this is not strictly a lyrical record. The duo's understanding of classic country, rock, and blues naturally appears. "Waltz About Whisky" swings like a honky tonk thanks to Nathan Golub's bending pedal steel as Marlin and Frantz plead, "Won't someone dance with me to a waltz about whisky and turn my sad songs to lullabies?" When Marlin's busy guitar weaves "Black Widow," Josh Oliver's sparse piano chords frame the track until its eerie conclusion. And "Morphine Girl" lazily trudges to James Wallace's drum while Ryan Gustafson conjures on electric guitar.
The closer, "Until The Last Light Fades," was written before Marlin met Frantz. With just Marlin's mandolin and Frantz's guitar, it's the most fragile track on the record. Although it's always been one of the duo's favorites to play, it didn't feel right on either of their previous releases. "It was so rewarding to have held out and have it come full circle," Frantz explains in choosing the track to end the record. And as Frantz sings, "Born to die, born to die, darling you'll live no longer than your years," it comes across like an old adage, something faintly familiar.

Marlin and Frantz have rambled through the dark and came out together on This Side Of Jordan more confident than ever. They've made simply structured songs with easy chords and humble harmonies. These are the hymns that Mandolin Orange was meant to offer.

$10.00 - $12.00

Tickets Available at the Door

Who’s Going

20

Upcoming Events
Missoula Winery and Event Center

  • Sorry, there are currently no upcoming events.