Nikki Lane duets on “Hurtin’ for Real.”
Tour of major U.S. cities begins in spring

LOS ANGELES, Calif. — Moot Davis had to triumph over several trials by fire to create his fourth album Goin’ In Hot, due out April 15, 2014 through Burnside Distribution. Just days after the song mixes were done, the Wow and Flutter Studio, where he recorded the album, burned to the ground. The East Nashville studio was a total loss, but producer Joe V. McMahan miraculously was able to extract the mixes out of the hard drive from his melted, water-soaked computer. Besides being thankful no one was hurt in the blaze, the New Jersey-based Davis also feels very lucky that the music was saved — “that it was meant to be.”

In a quirk of fate, Davis actually had chosen the album title Goin’ In Hot before the fire happened. In fact, the cover art, featuring a burning house, was done months earlier. The artwork also includes a dead crow clutching a wedding band, which refers to the disc’s other “trial by fire” — Davis made this record while recovering from the end of a long-time relationship. “I was so broken up about it just not working that I wrote from there,” Davis admits. The heartache and sorrow he explores on such songs as “Love Hangover,” “Made For Blood” and “Used To Call It Love” results in his more personal set of lyrics.

The emotional turmoil also served as a creative spark for Davis. “It opened me up to taking a lot of chances musically and not really caring about playing it safe.” After three retro country-based albums that drew favorable comparisons to Hank Williams Sr. and Dwight Yoakam, Goin’ In Hot leans more towards the roadhouse rock than the honky tonk.

Davis, who grew up in New Jersey listening to classic rock, was inspiration for this album from reading Keith Richards’ autobiography. “That turned me onto open G tuning,” Davis reveals. “Most of the album was written on a 5-string open G Telecaster and that changes things.” This influence can be heard in the fiery guitar work that ignite tracks like “Goin” In Hot,” “Walk Alone,” “Rag Man Roll” and “Midnight Train,” while the swamp funk of “Made For Blood” has a Little Feat-like vibe.

He doesn’t turn a cold shoulder to country music on the release. The workingman’s lament “Food Stamps” is one of several tunes enhanced by the pedal steel’s lonesome whine. With “Wanna Go Back,” Davis delivers a regret-filled ballad that could have come from a classic Merle Haggard album. The song, Davis admits, wasn’t an easy one for him to record. “It was emotionally hard to do. I still get a lump in my throat when I hear it.” He also states that the heartache he was experiencing came out in his singing. “I was hurting for real so I just didn’t care to be guarded vocally.”

Although many songs came out of his busted relationship, Goin’ In Hot isn’t strictly a break-up album. Love is cast in a positive light in “The Reason,” although this heartfelt song is about a son giving thanks to his mother. Davis wrote it over a decade ago when he was a broke, struggling musician in Nashville. He couldn’t afford to buy a Christmas gift for his mom so a friend suggested that he write her a song. The tune, which has been well received in live performances, provides a nice balance to the disc’s tales of heartache. Davis goes in a totally different direction on the album closer, “25 Light.” Suggesting Billy Lee Riley’s “Flying Saucing Rock ’n’ Roll” orbiting on acid, this wild, Marfa-inspired alien tale is the craziest track Davis has recorded to date.

Assisting Davis on this musical and emotional journey was his regular band, The Good Americans (bassist Michael Massimino, drummer Joe Mekler and guitarist Bill Corvino). Having road-tested most of these tunes together, the guys were primed when they got to the studio, and they needed only one or two takes to get everything right. Helming the recordings, which Davis described as a blast, was guitarist/producer Kenny Vaughan (Marty Stuart, Lucinda Williams), who produced last album, 2011’s Man About Town. Vaughan, whose contributions included playing the otherworldly Thermin on “25 Lights,” brought an “enthusiasm for the songs really drove the whole process,” according to Davis. “I think he had fun making this album; it was a departure from what he is normally involved in.”

Vaughan was especially instrumental in bringing Nikki Lane to do a “Hurtin' for Real” duet. “Kenny said he just finished working on a great new album by Nikki Lane for New West records. We got in touch with each other and she showed up on the first day of recording for the entire album. We had 45 minutes of fun knocking her part out — the song's title “Hurtin' for Real,” comes from a silly saying 'for real, for real'.

The idea of just making an album seemed remote to Davis only a few years ago. After doing two CDs for Little Dog Records, he found himself in label limbo. He was seriously considering quitting music and working on friend’s Madagascar plantation when, out of the blue, he was released from his label. He celebrated his freedom with Man About Town, which had critics hailing it as a “gem,” “triumph” and “a beautiful album.” NPR Weekend Edition observed that “Davis plays rockabilly, honky-tonk and what some critics have called ‘thinking man's country’.”

The disc served to reverse his career free-fall. In last couple years, Davis has had 20 songs placed in films and TV shows, and now has started his own label, Crow Town Records to put out Goin’ In Hot. “Now I feel great and I like the direction my music is headed in. I have a positive feeling that something good is in the works and the stars are aligning.”

The Honeycutters

The Honeycutters, an Asheville-based American Country Roots Band, Release 4th Studio Album, On The Ropes, May 20, 2016 on Organic Records

“The easy swagger of ‘On the Ropes,’ the saunter and sway of ‘Golden Child,’ the unassuming ramble of ‘The Handbook’ and the sweet serenade of ‘500 Pieces’ projects an effortless allure that remains consistently engaging throughout… obviously destined to become a heavyweight contender.”
--No Depression

“Forget Nashville, with their buzz-making brand of rock-roots-country, the Honeycutters are out to make Asheville, NC the brand new music city.” --Elmore Magazine Song Premiere: “On The Ropes”

ASHEVILLE, NC -- The Honeycutters have a voice you can’t ignore; a voice of persistence, of struggle and of hope, a voice that leads the new music movement erupting out of Asheville, NC. They released their 4th studio album On The Ropes May 20, 2016 on Organic Records. Nashville’s Music City Roots’ Craig Havighurst says principal songwriter and frontwoman, Amanda Anne Platt “has a voice that’s complex, sweet and aching. Even more potently, she writes songs that folks are citing as up there with the best of the field, such as Mary Gauthier and Lucinda Williams.” On The Ropes was produced by Amanda Anne Platt and Tim Surrett and engineered and mastered by Van Atkins at Crossroads Studios in Arden, NC.

In On The Ropes Platt continues to bring songs of heartache, yearning, and comebacks using phrases so relatable you wish you had thought of them yourself, ”Love ain't ever black and white, it's pink and gray and blue besides” (“Blue Besides”).

Platt’s writing is always personal. The title track, “On The Ropes,” is a rally song about coming back from hard knocks. “When I'm down for the count there's a voice I can't ignore,” like a continuous conversation with herself, pushing her along and encouraging her to make “something out of nothing.”

In a recent interview with David Dye of the World Cafe, Dye pointed out Platt’s string of songs with ‘love gone wrong’ themes. Her response, “Doesn’t everyone have stories of love gone wrong?” Part of Amanda’s significance as a songwriter lies in her ability to write everybody’s story and allow each listener to feel it’s theirs alone. She shares songs of love and loss, songs of struggles and fears; in “The Only Eyes” Amanda writes, “If there were an easier road that wasn't so crooked, Honey, I hope you know I would have took it.” NPR’s World Cafe, produced by XPN in Philadelphia, brought the show to Asheville’s The Grey Eagle this February for a sold out evening of entertainment including The Honeycutters in their “Sense of Place” series. Folks can listen in to The Honeycutters’ World Cafe segment at

The power of Amanda’s songwriting requires musicianship with the kind of edginess needed to match it, to cohesively surround the lyrics in just the right skin while still shining in their individual performances.

Joining Amanda Platt to round out The Honeycutters are Rick Cooper, alternating between upright and electric bass, accentuating the band’s delve deeper into a rock sound blending with their old-school country roots attitude. Along with drummer Josh Milligan the two create a powerful pocket and groove that locks the album together, with Milligan’s vocal harmonies complementing and enhancing Platt’s lead. The pedal steel work of Matt Smith brings unexpected rock licks on an instrument traditionally reserved for a classic country sound in tracks like “Blue Besides” and “Only Eyes”. Smith also shows his prowess on electric guitar with rock, and R&B flavored runs and solos like in “Golden Child”. Tal Taylor’s mandolin cuts through with bitey, bluesy notes and fierce tremolo that pushes the instrument beyond its obvious folk appeal.

On The Ropes has thirteen tracks of all original material with the exception of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah,” a song Amanda has been playing since before she moved to Asheville. She says, “We've had a number of people ask us to record our version, so here 'tis.”

A special vinyl edition of On the Ropes released April 12, 2016 on Vinyl Tuesday, as a featured national release for Record Store Week. It is a double album released through Organic Records®’ national distribution partner Select-O-Hits. “This here record store is Amanda Anne Platt country, and her new album On The Ropes with those masters of gritty roots-rock The Honeycutters is our new national anthem. Packed with incisive lyrics, unforgettable hooks and just the right balance between rock oomph, country heartache and singer/songwriter incisiveness, this is a must-have album is Appalachian honky-tonk with heart and guts,” writes Horizon Records out of Greenville, SC.

On The Ropes builds on the critical success of The Honeycutters breakout album Me Oh My [Organic Records 2015], which appeared on over twenty “2015 Year End Lists” including nods from No Depression, “It’s the type of country music you’d play on the jukebox and take a spin on a red dirt floor” and Cleveland Scene, “an upbeat symphony of regret, redemption and resurgence.” The album was voted #3 on WNCW’s Top 100 Listeners Poll (Under Jason Isbell and Alabama Shakes), listed in NPR’s Folk Alley’s Top 50, and was one of KBCS’s “Most Played Albums of 2015.”

In their “50 Essential Albums for 2015” list, Saving Country Music writes, "Me Oh My is the 14-song testament that you sense could be the centerpiece of her career when it’s all said and done... This is a band, an album, and a songwriter that both the Americana and country world should pay greater attention to." Me Oh My launched The Honeycutters onto the national stage, bringing along an army of fans with them. Don’t blink now, they’re coming back for more.

It has been said that overnight success is a result of long time dedication and hard work. Amanda writes, in “Golden Child,” her love letter to the music industry, “Now I don't mind if it takes a little time, when it comes to waiting I've been practicing for years.”

Song Premier: LISTEN: The Honeycutters, “Blue Besides” at The Bluegrass Situation →

Now available: CD, Vinyl and Digital: iTunes, Amazon, Tower Records, and Select-O-Hits

Stay tuned to,, and

Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle

Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle is a Cincinnati based, 4 piece Americana/Folk band that blends the tradition of heroes like Woody Guthrie and Mississippi John Hurt w/ contemporary flavor. In its short existence, the band has grown its fan base by getting out in front of folks. Whether it's the great variety of local shows or their regional touring, they always bring high energy onto every stage on which they perform.

Buffalo Wabs (aka Matt Wabnitz) spearheads this group, playing guitar and taking most of the vocal duties. Casey Campbell, Ian Mathieu, and Scott Risner comprise The Price Hill Hustle side of the equation. The group is deeply rooted in the tradition of Old Time pioneers; however, the energy they bring to a live performance could burn down the rowdiest honky-tonk in town.

The four members met through the Cincinnati music community at open mics and seeing each other at other shows around town. They've all had different musical projects of their own. After joining each other onstage at several venues they realized the chemistry was undeniable. They began playing more and more, and it seemed as though the more they played, the more they played. Crowds were hypnotized immediately.

"The Hustle," as they are often referred to, brings something uniquely different that is rarely found with bands. The band brings its own vibe everywhere it goes. It's almost a culture in itself. Followers have even begun to invent their own vernacular; for example, you may hear someone say they got "Hustled" last night. That's not necessarily a bad thing. Getting "Hustled" is just one's way of saying, "I saw Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle and they TORE IT UP!" Hopefully you can get yourself "Hustled" real soon.

$8.00 - $10.00


Upcoming Events
The Southgate House Revival-Sanctuary