MOOT DAVIS FIRES UP NEW ALBUM, GOIN’ IN HOT,
PRODUCED BY KENNY VAUGHAN,
OUT APRIL 15 THROUGH BURNSIDE

Nikki Lane duets on “Hurtin’ for Real.”
Tour of major U.S. cities begins in spring

LOS ANGELES, Calif. — www.mootdavis.com Moot Davis had to triumph over several trials by fire to create his fourth album Goin’ In Hot, due out April 15, 2014 through Burnside Distribution. Just days after the song mixes were done, the Wow and Flutter Studio, where he recorded the album, burned to the ground. The East Nashville studio was a total loss, but producer Joe V. McMahan miraculously was able to extract the mixes out of the hard drive from his melted, water-soaked computer. Besides being thankful no one was hurt in the blaze, the New Jersey-based Davis also feels very lucky that the music was saved — “that it was meant to be.”

In a quirk of fate, Davis actually had chosen the album title Goin’ In Hot before the fire happened. In fact, the cover art, featuring a burning house, was done months earlier. The artwork also includes a dead crow clutching a wedding band, which refers to the disc’s other “trial by fire” — Davis made this record while recovering from the end of a long-time relationship. “I was so broken up about it just not working that I wrote from there,” Davis admits. The heartache and sorrow he explores on such songs as “Love Hangover,” “Made For Blood” and “Used To Call It Love” results in his more personal set of lyrics.

The emotional turmoil also served as a creative spark for Davis. “It opened me up to taking a lot of chances musically and not really caring about playing it safe.” After three retro country-based albums that drew favorable comparisons to Hank Williams Sr. and Dwight Yoakam, Goin’ In Hot leans more towards the roadhouse rock than the honky tonk.

Davis, who grew up in New Jersey listening to classic rock, was inspiration for this album from reading Keith Richards’ autobiography. “That turned me onto open G tuning,” Davis reveals. “Most of the album was written on a 5-string open G Telecaster and that changes things.” This influence can be heard in the fiery guitar work that ignite tracks like “Goin” In Hot,” “Walk Alone,” “Rag Man Roll” and “Midnight Train,” while the swamp funk of “Made For Blood” has a Little Feat-like vibe.

He doesn’t turn a cold shoulder to country music on the release. The workingman’s lament “Food Stamps” is one of several tunes enhanced by the pedal steel’s lonesome whine. With “Wanna Go Back,” Davis delivers a regret-filled ballad that could have come from a classic Merle Haggard album. The song, Davis admits, wasn’t an easy one for him to record. “It was emotionally hard to do. I still get a lump in my throat when I hear it.” He also states that the heartache he was experiencing came out in his singing. “I was hurting for real so I just didn’t care to be guarded vocally.”

Although many songs came out of his busted relationship, Goin’ In Hot isn’t strictly a break-up album. Love is cast in a positive light in “The Reason,” although this heartfelt song is about a son giving thanks to his mother. Davis wrote it over a decade ago when he was a broke, struggling musician in Nashville. He couldn’t afford to buy a Christmas gift for his mom so a friend suggested that he write her a song. The tune, which has been well received in live performances, provides a nice balance to the disc’s tales of heartache. Davis goes in a totally different direction on the album closer, “25 Light.” Suggesting Billy Lee Riley’s “Flying Saucing Rock ’n’ Roll” orbiting on acid, this wild, Marfa-inspired alien tale is the craziest track Davis has recorded to date.

Assisting Davis on this musical and emotional journey was his regular band, The Good Americans (bassist Michael Massimino, drummer Joe Mekler and guitarist Bill Corvino). Having road-tested most of these tunes together, the guys were primed when they got to the studio, and they needed only one or two takes to get everything right. Helming the recordings, which Davis described as a blast, was guitarist/producer Kenny Vaughan (Marty Stuart, Lucinda Williams), who produced last album, 2011’s Man About Town. Vaughan, whose contributions included playing the otherworldly Thermin on “25 Lights,” brought an “enthusiasm for the songs really drove the whole process,” according to Davis. “I think he had fun making this album; it was a departure from what he is normally involved in.”

Vaughan was especially instrumental in bringing Nikki Lane to do a “Hurtin' for Real” duet. “Kenny said he just finished working on a great new album by Nikki Lane for New West records. We got in touch with each other and she showed up on the first day of recording for the entire album. We had 45 minutes of fun knocking her part out — the song's title “Hurtin' for Real,” comes from a silly saying 'for real, for real'.

The idea of just making an album seemed remote to Davis only a few years ago. After doing two CDs for Little Dog Records, he found himself in label limbo. He was seriously considering quitting music and working on friend’s Madagascar plantation when, out of the blue, he was released from his label. He celebrated his freedom with Man About Town, which had critics hailing it as a “gem,” “triumph” and “a beautiful album.” NPR Weekend Edition observed that “Davis plays rockabilly, honky-tonk and what some critics have called ‘thinking man's country’.”


The disc served to reverse his career free-fall. In last couple years, Davis has had 20 songs placed in films and TV shows, and now has started his own label, Crow Town Records to put out Goin’ In Hot. “Now I feel great and I like the direction my music is headed in. I have a positive feeling that something good is in the works and the stars are aligning.”

The Honeycutters

The Honeycutters are an original country roots band from Asheville, North Carolina. Since 2007, when the group formed, they have been playing music that is consistently as catchy as it is heartfelt. In 2011, 2012, and 2013 they were voted WNC’s favorite Americana band in the Mountain Xpress reader’s poll. Organically grown around the songs of lead singer Amanda Anne Platt, the band has gained an audience that has stretched far beyond their mountain home to include all corners of the United States.
Their most recent release, When Bitter Met Sweet (2012), hit #23 on the Americana Chart, and landed at #94 for the year. It was also one of the top ten best selling albums at MerleFest that same year. The record came in at #4 in WNCW’s listener voted top 100, and #2 in the regional favorites (right behind The Avett Brothers).
The Honeycutters’ first full length studio release Irene (May ’09) was recorded at Asheville’s own CollapseAble Studio, and mixed by Grammy Award winning sound engineer David Fergason (Nashville TN) . The album has garnered radio support across the USA as well as overseas, and landed them in Iaan Hughes’ (No Depression Podcast) top twenty of 2009, as well as in Fret Knot Radio Hour’s “Nine to Know from ’09,” and as number 32 in WNCW’s listener voted top 100.
Amanda Anne Platt has been hailed as “one of the best songwriters coming out of WNC these days” by WNCW programming director Martin Anderson, and her voice has been described as “perfectly unadorned” and “recklessly beautiful”. Her song, “Little Bird,” won second place in the general category of the MerleFest Chris Austin Songwriting contest in 2011 as well as taking home the grand prize in the Great Lakes Songwriting Contest that same year. Dane Smith of Asheville NC’s Mountain Xpress writes “Her songs make you sad…in a good way!” In both her simple composition and honest delivery it’s easy to hear the influence of country legends such as Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, or Loretta Lynn, and with this Miss Platt credits growing up listening to her father’s extensive record collection every Saturday morning. Despite her love for classic country, she cites Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty as major influences and her songwriting carries a wit and an edge that plants her firmly in her generation.
The band is frequently mentioned along with the movement to “take country music back to its roots”. The Honeycutters are just doing what they know how to do: making music that feels as good to hear as it does to play. Their original brand of Americana has proven equally appealing to both the musician and the music lover, the country and the city, and the old and the young.
Tal Taylor on mandolin, Rick Cooper on bass, and Josh Milligan on drums round out Platt’s songs and create a sound that carries just as well across the bar room as in a church or theater.
Since the release of their first studio album, The Honeycutters have shared the stage with such Americana greats as Guy Clark, Tony Rice, The Seldom Scene, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Donna The Buffalo, Jill Andrews, and The Steep Canyon Rangers. After a successful 2013 Kickstarter campaign, The Honeycutters are currently working on their third studio album to be released in 2014.

Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle

Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle is a Cincinnati based, 4 piece Americana/Folk band that blends the tradition of heroes like Woody Guthrie and Mississippi John Hurt w/ contemporary flavor. In its short existence, the band has grown its fan base by getting out in front of folks. Whether it's the great variety of local shows or their regional touring, the always bring high energy onto every stage they perform on.

Buffalo Wabs (aka Matt Wabnitz) spearheads this group, playing guitar and taking most of the vocal duties. Casey Campbell, Ian Mathieu, and Scott Risner comprise The Price Hill Hustle side of the equation. The group is deeply rooted in the tradition of Old Time pioneers; however, the energy they bring to a live performance could burn down the rowdiest honky-tonk in town.

The four members met through the Cincinnati music community at open mics and seeing each other at other shows around town. They've all had different musical projects of their own. After joining each other onstage at several venues they realized the chemistry was undeniable. They began playing more and more, and it seemed as though the more they played, the more they played. Crowds were hypnotized immediately.

"The Hustle," as they are often referred to, brings something uniquely different that is rarely found with bands. The band brings its own vibe everywhere it goes. It's almost a culture in itself. Followers have even begun to invent their own vernacular; for example, you may hear someone say they got "Hustled" last night. That's not necessarily a bad thing. Getting "Hustled" is just one's way of saying, "I saw Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle and they TORE IT UP!" Hopefully you can get yourself "Hustled" real soon.

$8.00 - $10.00

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Moot Davis, The Honeycutters with Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle

Saturday, January 25 · Doors 8:00 PM / Show 9:00 PM at The Southgate House Revival-Sanctuary