Zero Boys, The Scam, Ultraman, Scene Of Irony, The Haddonfields

It came out of nowhere in 1982, this punk rock/hardcore fireball with the bright yellow sleeve. In one sense, The Zero Boys' Vicious Circle was yet another example of how U.S. punk seemed to peak coast to coast that year. For the first time, it was truly a continental revolution, beyond just the initial, mostly coastal enclaves of New York, L.A., San Francisco, Toronto, Vancouver, Portland, Seattle, Houston, and Akron/Cleveland. Yet, with all the attention paid to these more established scenes, and those newly emerging in Washington, D.C., Boston, Detroit, and Chicago, who would have expected an LP this loaded with sheer intensity, unfettered zeal, up-front smarts, massive hooks, and blockbuster chops to come from little, corn-fed Indianapolis?

The young Midwest quartet was surprisingly tight, with a precision rarely associated with the new American hardcore: leaner, faster, meaner, more riotous, and eight times more explosive than on their previous, respected "Livin' in the '80s" 7" EP. And the recording quality was impeccable, zooming past like an amplified dragster. "Civilization's Dying" (with its insightful tie-in on the then-recent shootings of the otherwise completely-unrelated trio of John Lennon, president Ronald Reagan, and Pope John Paul II!), "Dirty Alleys/Dirty Minds," and "Hightime" all zipped by so fast and hard, yet crystal clear, whole others such as "New Generation" and a re-recorded, suped-up "Livin' in the '80s" were Who-like "My Generation" calls to arms for the new, exciting scene. Singer Paul Mahern ("Paul-Z" on the sleeve) was like an uncaged rabbit, singing so quickly yet so clearly, you didn't need a lyric sheet. Behind him, lightning-quick, adroit guitarist Terry Hollywood and punishing drummer Mark Cutsinger had their hands full keeping up with the fastest bassist in U.S. underground history this side of The Minutemen's Mike Watt, the truly outstanding David "Tufty" Clough.

The Scam

Ultraman is a punk rock band from St. Louis, Missouri, formed in 1986 with members Tim Jamison (vocals), Rob Wagoner (guitar), John Corcoran (bass), Bob Zuellig (guitar), and Mike Doskocil (drums). The band first released its own 7" EP's (alternately called "the Mr. Yuk 7" and "self-titled") in 1988 after selling demo tapes for over a year.

Their second 7" EP, called "Destroys All Monsters...Kills All Families" was recorded in May 1988, but not released until September of that year. This EP featured the same lineup, except Mark Deniszuk replaced Mike Doskocil on drums.

During this time, Ultraman played countless shows in St. Louis at notable venues such as Mississippi Nights (the first show played here was with Suicidal Tendencies. They would follow up this show by playing with bands as diverse as the Exploited and Dead Milkmen.) [1] Ultraman also frequently played the surrounding Midwestern region, with many shows in Lawrence, Kansas at the famed Outhouse.

Ultraman expanded their Midwestern focus and decided to promote the singles with an east coast tour in July 1988. On this tour, Ultraman played dates in Leonardtown, Maryland with McRad (Chuck Treece’s band while he was also in Underdog), Boston, and NYC at the Pyramid Club.

After this tour, singer Tim Jamison sent a copy of the band's single and band t-shirts to Jack at Caroline Records, in the hope of getting the band signed. Jack didn't think they were a fit with the label, but passed along their singles to Nicky Garrett .

At the time, Garrett ran the Caroline warehouse and was just starting New Red Archives. He had already signed east coast bands Crucial Youth, Kraut and UK Subs and was looking for a Midwestern band who had both name recognition and had toured.

In late 1988, Garrett offered to sign Ultraman to his NRA label and asked the band to record their first album. At this time, Bob Zeulig was replaced by Mike Story . [2]

According to singer Tim Jamison, Ultraman's first album, "Freezing Inside" would be recorded in New York in a studio at famed ad agency Saatchi & Saatchi, using the same microphone that was used to record Trix cereal commercials. The album was produced by Tom Lyle of Government Issue in 1989.

To promote the album, Ultraman toured the west coast with another St. Louis band, Whoppers Taste Good then the east coast and Canada with UK Subs.

In 1990, the band learned they would be touring Europe with Samiam [3] and went into the studio to record a new album in preparation for the tour. During this time, Mike Story was briefly replaced by Pat Hercules for some live shows, but he was eventually replaced by Matt Smith to record the next album and subsequent European tour.[4]

The second album was called "Non Existence" and was produced by Nicky Garrett and recorded in San Francisco. During the recording, Ultraman played 924 Gilman Street. After several more U.S. shows, the band headed off to Europe to play Germany, Austria, Yugoslavia, Italy, Switzerland, Holland, France, and England with punk band Samiam. Ultraman decided to call this tour "European In Your Pants."

The band returned to the U.S. to play live shows throughout the country. In February 1991, Rick Ulrich from Whoppers Taste Good replaced Matt Smith. [5] Ultraman was set to go back to Europe for another tour. John John replaced John Corcoran on bass for this leg.[6]

Ultraman toured solo for the 1991 tour, playing shows in Holland, Belgium, Germany and Austria. They returned to America once again, but this time broke up.[7] They played a final, sold-out show at legendary Mississippi Nights on December 30, 1991.[8]

While formally broken up, Ultraman still played dozens of reunion shows throughout the Midwest. In 1999, the band officially re-formed, with the lineup of Tim Jamison on vocals, John John on bass, Tim O'Saben on guitar, Bob Fancher on guitar and Jason Simpson on drums. [9]

This incarnation of Ultraman continued to play shows in St. Louis while writing new songs. The band has always been one of St. Louis's most requested opening acts for touring punk and hardcore punk bands that came to play in the region.

By 2001, Rob Wagoner returned to the band, replacing Tim O'Saben. [10] This lineup would record the album "The Constant Weight of Zero," which was released in 2004.[11]
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraman_(band)"

Bob Fancher, Guitar, vox
Gabe Usery, Drums

Scene Of Irony

St Louis' ENGLISH connection!
Maurice "Moe" Holmes(vocals, guitar)Donnell Robinson(drums)Shawn Combs(guitar)Shaughnessy Denney(bass, backing vocals)Our first projected date for eligibility into the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame: April 1, 2029
AND DONT YOU DARE CALL MOE "STEVE"!

The Haddonfields

We are a pop punk band from the midwest. We drink a lot of beer, talk a lot of shit and sweat...a lot!

$15.00

Tickets

add to your calendar

Who’s Going

Upcoming Events
FUBAR

Ticketfly

Zero Boys, The Scam, Ultraman, Scene Of Irony, The Haddonfields

Saturday, January 11 · Doors 7:00 PM / Show 8:00 PM at FUBAR