Danzig w/ Break Thru Winners - Disable Time & Heavy Necker

Glenn Danzig is a name that permeates, infects, and ultimately makes strong, the very soul of hard rock in the '90s. Through the legendary punk charge of his pre-Danzig outfits Misfits and Samhain, Danzig formed the backbone of today's mosh movement. Into the deep waves of the Danzig catalogue, and you've got a band that has created high-tension hybrids that are still being pondered and quietly adopted throughout today's metal community. Over eight million records sold, and Danzig is about to unleash a multi-media onslaught that will once again find disciples studying the master.

But first a little history.Danzig's early works took full advantage of what was initially a vital and productive working relationship ith Rick Rubin, resulting in a self-titled 1988 debut and a follow-up in '90 called Lucifuge that together enveloped the man's interest in punk,doom,gothic new wave and an intense California twist on black Satanic metal,culminating in a display of shockingly dark hard rock that sent chills the likes of which today's Norwegian churchburners could never know.

Danzig III: How The Gods Kill dropped in'92, rewriting the books on Sabbatherian doom metal; super charging the genre with molten guitar god riffs, foreboding but poetic lyrics,and above the fray, THAT VOICE. Glenn is a sonorious tenor blessed with the abilityto caress and terrorize all within a few short breaths.As the luck of the draw would have it, Danzig next found himself with an odd, unplanned Hit on his hands; a live version of the debut album's 'Mother' introducing the mainstream to this buffed-up, 'black leather powerhouse'. 1993's Thralldemonsweatlive EP went on to platinum status (following a similarly exalted fate for the debut),and Danzig's commercial legacy was ensured.

Never one to be complacent,Glenn rewired the band's sound into a frosty but intimate affair paradoxically rife with studio wizardry.Danzig 4P hit in '94,Glenn once more confounding the world with a record that would be a critically acclaimed masterpiece,casual but crafted,sinewy and insidious.

As relations with Danzig's label Def American broke down, so did Danzig's relationship with his band.Glenn found himself seeking fresh personnel and a fresh perspective, creating the darkwave industrial rhythms of Danzig 5: Blackacidevil, a record which, once again, was to re-engineer the cutting edge of hard rock in Danzig's imposing,muscle-strapped image.

But harsh circumstances have brewed, distilled, and unleashed a blistering counter punch by the name of Danzig 6:66 Satans Child, a record that is a visceral and aggressive statement of black intent,unafraid to clutch and grab from today's technologies, but more in tune with the frightening power of a well-juiced guitar.

Danzig 6 features essentially the same line-up as its predecessor, but there are a number of fresh pioneers associated with the project. Glenn's co-producer is Peter Lorimer, a remix king who has worked with the likes of Bowie, while engineer Josh Abraham has collaborated with Orgy, Coal Chamber and Korn. And speaking of Orgy, J. Gordon and Amir Derakh have stuck their hands into the pot and mixed fully seven of the record's twelve tracks. What the team has come upwirth is an inspiring and often trance-like Heavy Metal churn that understands the present and predicts the future, a record that re-writes the darkness of doom in the image of millennial technologies.

"Danzig 6 will have no problem living up to the hype, as well as the hyperspeeds at which that hype will spread through the net. One listen will confirm the often Sabbath- like authority of the record, coupled with a portfolio of unique Glenn Danzig voicings that astonish in their range, hue and suggestive malevolence. 'Five Finger Crawl' is a perfect example of Glenn's multiple deliveries within one song, Glenn whispering to a soundtrack of military metal countered with silken melody come chorus time. 'Cold Eternal' is a personal favorite of Glenn's, a song which he simply describes as "really, really sad." A treasure reveals itself within the closing track, '13', on which Glenn captures the classic but only occasional Danzig blues vibe, something that wraps Dylan's 'Ballad Of Hollis Brown', Robert Johnson's deal with the devil, not to mention Elvis and Johnny Cash in a dark blanket of woeful dirge rock that could only come from one band. Elsewhere, it's power chords a' plenty, fraught with drama, supported on a bed of subtle electronics, frighteningly doom-laden but infused with hook and groove

It's unlike any Danzig record you've heard. Not like any two from the catalogue have much in common. Unsurprising, says Glenn. "It comes back to something that I've always said. I don't like doing the same record over and over again. It's like, if I'm not going to do something different, I won't even do a rock record, I'll just do something else, you know; Like my comic book company, or a classical project. But I think the unifying thread is that basic punk rock attitude. I think it shines through on all of them, yes."

If Danzig 6:66 marks a majestic rebirth of the Danzig sound, this synthesis of the man's evil guitar rock and his selective pillaging of industrial conventions, it is a record that is only the beginning of a remarkable two year plan within the Danzig camp. Expect to see a Samhain box set, followed by individual reissues of the records, reissues of the entire Danzig catalogue, plus no less than three new projects cradling the millennium: the second installment of Black Aria, a massive Danzig b-sides collection, and finally a double live album, culled from years spent headlining stages in front of mod hotshots like Korn, Soundgarden, Type O Negative and Marilyn Manson.

It is a sinister time in the tired life of one world ending, and it unmistakably a time for the destructive and redemptive powers of the next century's man in black. Heed the warning: Danzig 6:66 Satan's Child is only the scabbard tip of what we can expect from Danzig throughout the birthing of a new rebel century. It is however, Danzig's soul crusher of a calling card, his coal-fired ebony heart made metal, the siren song soundtrack of two age in collision. Confront it now and feel your lifeblood drain and subsequently replenish truer than ever.

xxxxx -Martin Popoff

Otep got their start in late 2000, when singer/band namesake Otep Shamaya brought her Marilyn Manson-meets-Kim Gordon style of singing to a crew of musicians known only as Rob, Moke, and eViL j. The foursome began gigging around Los Angeles and scored a deal with Capitol solely on the strength of their live show (they'd not yet recorded a demo). Spots on prominent tours such as Ozzfest and kudos from Marilyn Manson helped the band build a rabid following with Sevas Tra, their 2002 debut album. Otep released their fifth full-length album, Atavist, last year.

Butcher Babies

Faster than you can say heavy fucking metal, The Butcher Babies have
clawed their way to the top of the Hollywood music scene to become the
undisputed darlings of the Sunset Strip. Now, they are poised to take
on the rest of the world.

Fronted by Carla Harvey and Heidi Shepherd, and backed by Henry Flury
on lead guitar (Amen), Jason Klein on bass (Azdachao), and Chris
Warner on drums (Scars of Tomorrow), the Butcher Babies dish out
brutal grooves that attack the crowd during performances that play out
like a slaughter house carnival ride.

Rock Journalist Keith Valcourt recently hailed the Butcher Babies as
"The Hottest Band in the World" in his review of a show. "The Butcher
Babies deliver a loud crashing blend of heavy metal, punk and thrash
that recalls Pantera" notes Valcourt, adding "their stage show
embodies the horror antics of Alice Cooper and Rob Zombie. Carla and
Heidi don't merely sing: they assault the crowd with a blinding flash
of aggression and abuse. And the crowd loves them for it."

The perfect anti heroes for today's lackluster corporate music scene,
The Butcher Babies are answering the demand for a resurgence of the
days when going to a rock show was an event with their blistering
combination of theatrical presence and balls out metal.

Texas Hippie Coalition

There are two paths you can take in life. You can choose to fall in line and be a follower, always fifth or sixth back, lagging behind others. Or you can make your own line and live as you choose, with everyone else landing behind you, while you create your own thing. Want to guess which line Texas Hippie Coalition have chosen?

That's right. The purveyors of their own patented Red Dirt Metal sound are designing their own line in life and in music. For them, there is no other way.

Texas Hippie Coalition are committed to crafting a unique, original and thoroughly raucous brand of music that's born of both life experience and a respect for rock 'n' roll's forefathers. What exactly is Red Dirt Metal? Take outlaw country, toss in a dash of Southern-fried classic rock and mix it with some potent Texas power grooves and you've got a combustible sonic cocktail on your hands. Texas Hippie Coalition's third album Peacemaker is a textbook example of Red Dirt Metal, which is the sound the band has been honing and cultivating for its entire existence.

THC's frontman Big Dad Ritch, known as the "Godfather" of the RDM sound and an individual with a laser-like focus and vision when it comes to his music, believes that the band has hit its stride on Peacemaker, capturing the spirit of rock 'n' roll outlaws like Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson. He declares, "The outlaw spirit is still alive today. That is our goal: Bring it back."

THC, who were the first band signed to their label Carved Records back in 2009, want fans of classic rock bands to know that they are carrying the torch and that they want to be the keepers of the genre's keys. There will be no extinction of this beloved genre if THC have anything to say about it. "We want the people that love Molly Hatchet, ZZ Top, .38 Special, the Van Zandts and those bands that are growing older to know that somebody else out there is already waving the flag high," he declared. The band, in essence, is ensuring that the style continues to have new and noteworthy additions, such as itself.

But Texas Hippie Coalition aren't simply about making sure the outlaw rock style that they pretty much worship stays alive. They want it to evolve, infusing it with a modern edge and energy, thanks to the new tools (or is that weapons?) of the trade. Having also been surrounded and influenced by the likes of Black Label Society and Pantera –with Ritch proudly proclaiming to having seen the latter between 50 and 75 times live- Texas Hippie Coalition are turning in something fresh and fierce with Peacemaker. They aren't just paying homage to Southern rock's cultural milemarkers. They are proceeding with the intent to add to its canon.

The process of making the album was at first bolstered by levels of familiarity and comfort. "Me and [bassist] John Exall have been together a long time, and we're soldiers always ready to go into battle no matter what," Ritch said about his bandmates. The lineup is now rounded out by [drummer] Gunnar Molton and [guitarist] Cord Pool.

But there were also some changes and shifts, which also add to the album's heft and helped the band to expand. Texas Hippie Coalition recruited producer Bob Marlette (Black Sabbath, Alice Cooper) to work his magic and to help the band to further explore what it was capable of with an already established, branded sound. "We have a new producer and we already know who we are and what our brand is, so with this album, we decided that the boundaries we set for ourselves [are] in the past. We would cut that barbed wire and explore beyond those fences" Ritch said.

Exploring beyond those fences and cutting that barbed wire meant creating what the band calls "heart songs." Rather than saddle them with a generic term like "ballad," Texas Hippie Coalition chose to call 'em "heart songs" because they touch the listener's ticker. "They take you even deeper into the heart and soul, and into the deeper darkness," Ritch admitted. He even referenced his biggest musical hero's ability to vacillate between the dark and the light. "Johnny Cash could still let you inside and see the darkness of the man," Ritch pointed out. "Johnny Cash was not just wearing black on the outside. There are parts of him that are black, and that same idea comes across on this album for us."

Even with "heart songs," Ritch issues a Surgeon General's warning of sorts. "This album here takes you on a harder, longer drive, right into a brick wall. Strap yourself in." Isn't that the best type of rock 'n' roll there is?

Speaking about specific songs on Peacemaker, he said that the visceral "'Damn You to Hell' is maybe the heaviest song we've written. It has such drive and intensity that it's like a mixed martial arts event, like UFC pay per view, like someone being grounded and pounded on." You may emerge feeling like you've been administered a beating, but as evidenced in Fight Club, you can come out the other side cleansed and stronger from the catharsis.

"Think Of Me" is admittedly "the closest thing to a love song that this band would ever do. It is a great song. It goes beyond those boundaries." Other songs that typify Red Dirt Metal include "8 Seconds" and "You Ain't Seen Me," which Ritch admits is "as southern-fried as Lynyrd Skynyrd and Molly Hatchet."

The title song is a brilliantly written tune, told from the perspective of a gun. Ritch said, "I thought, 'What would that gun say to people?'" That's not something you come across every day in rock music, and it's further evidence of how Texas Hippie Coalition are rewriting the rule book. The song boasts the lyrics, "I just whooped the devil's ass / And you ain't seen nothing if Jesus asks / It wasn't nothing for him to see / This is all between God and me." See what we mean about the outlaw spirit? It's wholly present in every note, riff and lyric of Peacemaker.

Essentially, Peacemaker, which follows the previous albums The Pride of Texas and Rollin', is like one of those out-of-control parties that will find you without a girlfriend and with pissed off family members the very next day, but you'll be gawking over your killer new tattoo while nursing an awful hangover. It's the stuff of life, the good time ingredient that you can't manufacture or fake. It comes from a very real place, thanks to Texas Hippie Coalition's ability to understand their influences and mine them into something wholly unique.

Stolen Babies formed from a 12+ member high school performance troupe named the Fratellis; the band takes its name from one of the skits performed by the group during this period (written by Dominique Persi, who handled the theatrical and performance-art aspect of the group). Stolen Babies released their first Demo CD in 2002 through their own label, No Comment Records.

Among the band's many musical influences are groups such as Oingo Boingo, Mr. Bungle, and Fishbone (with whom Gil Sharone has performed). Stolen Babies are known for their on-stage theatrics and energetic performances, filled with props and Gorey-esque backdrops, all made by the various members. Except for the earliest demo, each album has featured artwork by indie comic artist Crab Scrambly.

New Years Day formed in 2005 after bassist Adam Lohrbach left the band Home Grown. Home Grown's final EP, 2004's When it All Comes Down, had diverged from the band's previous style of humorous pop punk and incorporated many emotional elements that Lohrbach carried over into New Years Day. Meeting with vocalist Ashley Costello and guitarist/keyboardist Keith Drover, the three began rehearsing songs that Costello and Lorhbach had written. These songs were heavily influenced by the members' shared emotional experiences, as Lohrbach and Costello had both recently been through difficult relationship break-ups.

The group soon added guitarist Mike Schoolden (formerly of Wakefield) and drummer Russell Dixon and took the name New Years Day.
The band began building a reputation through promotion and posting songs on the MySpace social networking website, and were featured on the MySpace Records Volume 1 compilation CD and in the soundtrack of the video game Saints Row. After considering an offer from the Pete Wentz-run Decaydance Records label, the band signed to TVT Records and released a debut self-titled EP in 2006. Originally referred to as the Razor EP, it was primarily a digital release made available through download services such as iTunes, though CD copies were also available at the band's performances. They also performed at the South by Southwest music festival that same year.

From 2006–2007 New Years Day self-financed and self-produced their debut album My Dear, recorded over an eight-month period at the home of producer Eugene Perreras.[3] The album was released on May 8, 2007 and includes collaborations with members of Reel Big Fish and Motion City Soundtrack. The band's debut music video for the lead single "I Was Right" won an MTVU "Freshman Face" poll and was added to the channel's playlist.

The band started writing new material in early 2009. Around September 2009, NYD posted two new songs on their MySpace page.[8] When asked about a new EP, vocalist Ashley Costello said, "The EP is in its demo phase right now and we are still writing for it and recording it at the same time. The EP should be out in the spring of 2010."

On March 12, 2010, Alternative Press announced that New Year's Day have been added on the Warped Tour's summer dates. New Year's Day released their Japanese debut album called "Headlines & Headstones" on July 2nd, 2010 under Spinning Inc. The album contains music from their first EP, their first LP "My Dear", a Lady Gaga cover and new songs from their upcoming 2nd full-length US album.

Disable Time

Disable Time delivers a unique blend of rock, funk, latin, and fusion all with a new feel. Based out of Fairfield, Disable Time has taken Connecticut by storm. In under two years they have performed over 50 shows in all corners of the state as well as regular shows in New York City.

Disable Time started as an instrumental band two years ago and successfully managed to cultivate a local following. After some time performing and writing, a desire grew within the group to evolve and they decided to add vocals. In May of 2013 lead singer, Nick Anaya, joined DT bringing the band to a new level. Their creative process is done as a group, incorporating the individuality of the artists while creating a fluid story of intertwining instruments and vocals.

Disable Time recently had their television debut being featured on News Channel 8's Connecticut Style. Their newest single, "Under African Skies" drops in late July of 2013.

Fit For An Autopsy

Corrupt politicians, manipulative mainstream media, government surveillance, mass shootings, clean water shortages, religious warfare, aggressive agribusiness, climate change, GMOs and a whole host of mind-numbing problems certainly make it feel like humankind is "going to hell in a hand basket," as they say. There may be nothing that can be done about it at this point. But at least we have a killer soundtrack.

Fit For An Autopsy's Hellbound is the perfect score with which to watch the flames rise. Punishing, unrelenting and alternately both heavy and dissonant, the New Jersey metal band's first album for Good Fight/eOne conjures visions of Nero vigorously attacking his fiddle, even as Rome was engulfed in fire all around him. Esteemed English actor Michael Caine delivers perhaps the best line in Christopher Nolan's "The Dark Knight" trilogy: "Some men just want to watch the world burn."

Death metal often chooses to deal in devils, demons and horror-movie inspired gore. "Deathcore" detours into broken relationships and introspective issues, much like its scene cousins in Metalcore and alt-rock. Fit For An Autopsy blaze their own path, opting to address the dirty, gritty and grimy reality of modern day life. There's no fantasy, no plaintive odes to lost love. This music is hell. These songs are Hellbound.

Scene queens, careerist cartoons and poseur-iffic hacks best step aside when confronted with the self-assured, art-for-art's-sake vibe of Fit For An Autopsy. As MetalSucks observed early on: "The band's brutal, glowering take on [deathcore] reminded [us] of the squandered potential of the genre. Hardcore grooves and swagger, when incorporated correctly, blend quite well with death metal."

On Hellbound, Fit For An Autopsy expand upon their commanding approach to an often maligned subgenre by synthesizing the rhythmic experimentalism of Gojira, the aggressive post-Noisecore of Converge, the esoteric and meditative tribalism of Isis, a virulent dose of the New Wave Of Swedish Death Metal (At The Gates, Dark Tranquility, early In Flames), the legendary progenitors of Floridian death metal (Death, Morbid Angel, Cannibal Corpse, Obituary) and the "deathcore" acts who offer actual proficiency in the genre (Suicide Silence, All Shall Perish, Whitechapel).

Each nuanced building block is meticulously assembled together to form a near-perfect modern metal masterpiece, all with the confident vibe of a group of people making the music they want to make for its own sake, trends and "hype" be damned.


There was justifiable reason to be excited about Fit For An Autopsy from the start. The rich pedigree of its core members foreshadowed the momentous music that was to come. Nate Johnson's stint fronting Through The Eyes Of The Dead resonated with many death metal diehards. Guitarist Will Putney is an accomplished metal producer, mixer, engineer and cowriter. Putney's fingerprints are all over currently relevant albums from Stray From The Path, Reign Supreme, Misery Signals, Vision of Disorder, Counterparts, For Today, Like Moths To Flames, Stray From The Path and more. Guitarist Patrick Sheridan is rightly well regarded for his work on the fretboard as well as with a tattoo machine. The rhythm section of bassist Shane Slade and Sick Drummer-approved Josean Orta is beyond formidable.

The earliest rumblings of Fit For An Autopsy emerged on a 2008 demo. The self-released Hell on Earth EP arrived the following year, eliciting interest from Guy Kozowyk, The Red Chord vocalist and Black Market Activities label honcho. Kozowyk released Fit For An Autopsy's devastating debut, The Process of Human Extermination, in 2011. Sputnik Music paid particular attention to Johnson's dominating presence. "The dude's a swamp creature," they wrote of his "absurd" (in a good way) delivery. "When you hear him scream, it's like, 'What the ---- was that?' You realize whatever it is would probably eat you if you ran into it in the woods."

The group's seething contempt for modern society is rivaled only by the sonic bombardment dropped upon the unsuspecting all over Hellbound, a record that is equal parts challenging and engaging. It's an album designed to make people feel uncomfortable, while at the same time, counter-intuitively soothed by its catharsis. Criminals, junkies and the systems that fail them; deadbeat parents; poisoned food; BS celebrities and false idols; they've all led humanity here. Hellbound draws a line in the sand. It's a declaration that even it's all going down the proverbial drain likeminded individuals can take some solace in the expression of shared rage.

MONGREL

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Danzig w/ Break Thru Winners - Disable Time & Heavy Necker with Doyle, Otep, Butcher Babies, Texas Hippie Coalition, Stolen Babies, A PALE HORES NAME DEATH, New Yea...

Saturday, October 19 · Doors 3:00 PM / Show 5:00 PM at Palladium