“I was a loose canon,” the commanding front woman says. “I was losing serious control of my personal and creative life. I was falling apart, trying to escape. I felt like Bleached was the only thing I actually cared about.”

The 10-song LP was born out of triple the amount of demos. Sometimes the three girls spent time writing at a remote house in Joshua Tree away from the seemingly destructive city (a first since bassist Micayla had never contributed to songwriting on previous releases). Other times Jen and Jessie worked alone, just like when they were teenaged punk brats playing in their parent’s San Fernando Valley garage imitating their heroes The Slits, Black Flag and Minor Threat.

In the studio, Chiccarelli and co-producer Carlos de la Garza (Paramore, YACHT) helped the band perfect their fervent songs into fearlessly big pop melodies. They drew inspiration from the iconic hits of everyone from Fleetwood Mac to Heart to Roy Ayers. They focused on pre-production and challenged the songs. Jessie took her usual approach to guitar overdubs and leads (her favorite duty in a recording session). “I just let my fingers play and kind of surprise me,” she smirks. Still remaining to keep the band’s origin of cheeky, California-punk in the forefront, Welcome The Worms became a smarter, heavier, emotionally deeper Bleached.

“Before we even knew we were working together, I remember Joe saying, you can’t lose these melodies, no matter how raw the music gets,” Jen explains. She penned demos on an acoustic guitar and focused. “If I was happy [with the songs] in [their] rawest form, then I knew it would be even better after going through production.”

“I’ve become a more confident musician,” adds Jessie. “I wanted to be open-minded to this record and try new things we hadn’t done before. I felt such a great amount of respect working with the people we did on this record, feeling really free to do what I wanted to do, and making it a Bleached world.”

Welcome The Worms is an ambitious rock record with a new found pop refinement that somehow still feels like the Shangri-Las on speed, driven forward in a wind of pot and petals, a wall of guitars in the back seat. “Keep on Keepin’ On” is a hypnotic opening anthem that spins like a kaleidoscope, while “Sleepwalking” and “Trying To Lose Myself Again” invoke the struggle of floating through life on autopilot. The drums are instinctual, while the bass bounces like a rubber ball over the lyrics on a karaoke screen. “Sour Candy” is a stand-out hit so effortless and catchy it sticks in your head for days. Synth is only brought in as a thickening agent, just like the harmonies. “Chemical Air” and “I’m All Over The Place (Mystic Mama)” toy with pop sensibilities, while “Desolate Town” shows Jen getting weird on the verses before a Cobain-like chorus.

Throughout the record, Bleached paints a frivolous picture of Los Angeles: the life of eye-rolling caused by dating men in bands, dirty Sunset Boulevard and futile drunken nights in a starstruck hole that made everyone from Charles Manson to Darby Crash to Marilyn Monroe stare up at the Hollywood sign for direction. Although a typical theme of ruined romance floats through the album, the real power is in Jen figuring out herself through lyrics so straight, identifiable and honest. This was a first for the girl who safely hid behind a cheeky misdemeanor. She did a lot of messing up and even more digging into herself.

“Sometimes [writing this album] made me hate myself and sometimes it made me love myself,” she admits. “But being aware of how I felt is what I wanted.” It became clear that Jen had to embrace the good with the horrible and learn to overcome it all through music.

One evening, high on psychedelics and up all night, Jen and a friend passed a freaky couple at Echo Park Lake peddling homemade religious pamphlets. “One page was a bunch of cut and paste sentences with images. I’m always really intrigued by those crazy DIY religious books. It all was so perfect at that moment [because] it was about embracing the dark side of life instead of pretending it isn’t there because it’s all beautiful and I wouldn’t give any of it up for anything.” Welcome The Worms was sprawled across the tripped out pamphlet. The phrase stuck.

“We don’t want perfection because it’s boring,” she continues. “We want to make music that’s as real as life.”

-Mish Way

together Pangea

"Pangea, the super continent, might just have something in common with the super garage rockers of the same moniker hailing out of Los Angeles—and I'm talking about the word super here. These dudes back big names, they tour with the best of the garage punk world and for the simple reason that they belong there—but we want, nay need, more Pangea.Killer Dreams, their split released EP from Lauren and Ghostbot Records, follows the stellarLiving Dummy and proves that they are living up to that super-ism that invisibly trails their name." - Get Bent

The LA garage-punk quartet Pangea creates the sort of sloppy and squalling rock tunes that fans of Wavves or Ty Segall would appreciate. How do they stand out among their contemporaries? The froggy-throated lead singer and his crass lyrics are incongruously mashed on top of nimble surf-rock guitar lyrics and harmonizing, doo-wopping backup vocals, resulting in something strangely and delightfully charming, kind of like the way you might find a snotty neighborhood troublemaker to be a little cute. There's a great video on Vimeo of Pangea at the Silverlake comic book store Secret Headquarters playing "Night of the Living Dummy" on their duct-taped, PBR-stickered guitars; the song is from last fall's Living Dummy, which was released on tape and vinyl on California cassette kings Burger Records and includes such masculinely-awkward tracks as "Make Me Feel Weird" and "Too Drunk To Come." - Seattle Weekly

"Living Dummy is something more punk records should be: funny. Songs like "Too Drunk To Cum" are hilariously out of control, clutching at the outer rims of sanity. (The group even deadpans an eerie laugh on the track.) But the real star here is the music--you get the feeling that the band -- especially the drummer -- is beating the shit out of their instruments. It's loud and crude, and that's a good thing." - LA WEEKLY

Cherry Glazerr

Cherry Glazerr was dreamt up by Clementine Creevy at age 15 in her LA bedroom. Having released their debut, Haxel Princess, on much-loved Cali imprint Burger Records and the scorching Had Ten Dollaz 7” on Suicide Squeeze, the band has now evolved into a wildly complex, hugely guitar heavy, and unapologetically loud machine. The catchy hooks in Cherry Glazerr’s songs offer a counterpoint to the purposeful social commentary and incisive humour which has been ever-present since the band’s formation. Bolstering Clem's vision is the loud-in-every-way-possible drummer Tabor Allen and the level-headed, nevertheless bad-ass, multi-instrumentalist Sasami Ashworth.

Their new single, 'Told You I'd Be With The Guys' documents Clem's realization that she needed to establish solidarity with other women and stop being a “lone wolf.” “Sexism is so ingrained in me, I can often feel that men are the only ones who can help me socially, economically. The most important thing in my life is that I've realized I need to work for solidarity. That song's both hopeful and dismal!” she laughs. Clem still feels like she constantly need to prove herself. “Women work from behind their oppression. In order to make good art you need to be emotionally free and sadly, not a lot of women are able to do that. That always puts a fire under my ass.”

Winter is Samira Winter, Nolan Eley, Kyle Oppenheimer and Ana Karina DaCosta. The dream pop/shoegaze band started in Boston, MA with the initial collaboration between Samira Winter and Nolan Eley working on their first EP "Daydreaming," released last December. Now the full band is living in L.A., playing shows, working on new songs and always daydreaming.

This show at El Cid celebrates the release of their "Daydreaming" EP on cassette!! Available on Lolipop Records.

$12.00 - $14.00

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