School Night! featuring:

School Night! featuring:

The Ghost Wave sound finds itself somewhere between the Flying Nun bands of the ‘80s, the British explosion of the ‘60s and the wayfaring dubs of Lee "Scratch" Perry. At its inception, the brainchild of Matthew L. Paul (Vocals, Guitar), Ghost Wave was a project relegated to a small room in Auckland, New Zealand. In time, the sonic chemistry that resulted from one person’s relentless work caught the attention of fellow music maker and soon-to-be collaborator Eammon Logan (Drums). Together they self-recorded what came to be their self-titled EP; a collection of sunny and warped songs characterized by jangly guitars underpinned by motor-style rhythms and a unique melodic sensibility. Ghost Wave recruited the talents of Mike Ellis (Bass, Vocals) and Jamie Kennedy (Guitar) to assist with the recording. Shortly after, both join the band.

After delivering an impressive first collection of songs, Ghost Wave was increasingly drawn to their rehearsal space and studio rather than the stage. The group mounted a stockpile of new songs and demos. Shy and often somewhat reclusive, the band was in uncharted territory when they left their studio and the live show took shape. While playing shows and parties around their hometown, the band started to gain local attention and soon the acclaim of international tastemaker blog, Neon Gold. Praising the first single from their self-titled EP, Neon Gold proclaimed that ‘Sunsetter, “two and a half minutes of sun kissed 70’s bliss,” is a song of “anthem status.” The blog drew sonic comparisons from the likes of Dandy Warhols, to Deerhunter and Tame Impala. Pretty Much Amazing expressed early support for the band, premiering single “Hippy” and describing it as an “invincible lo-fi summer jam, the one that fits the fireworks and the too-fast driving.”

With some early praise in their pockets and a quickly developing catalog of work, Ghost Wave traveled to the U.S. for shows in New York, Los Angeles and a showing at CMJ. Ghost Wave returned to the U.S. several months later for appearances at 35 Denton Festival and SXSW; showcasing even more new songs along with an updated live configuration. Shortly after, the band caught the attention of Flying Nun Records; a home to many bands that Ghost Wave proudly acknowledge as influences. Flying Nun Records recently partnered with Brooklyn-based label: Captured Tracks (DIIV, Mac DeMarco). Ghost Wave’s Ages will be the first release from the seminal New Zealand label since partnering with Captured Tracks.

‘Here She Comes’ is the first single from the forthcoming LP and “Over the course of its 3 minutes and 23 seconds, the Auckland-based quartet layer laid-back and nonchalant vocals over jangly guitars and an upbeat bassline. Supported by a boisterous drumbeat,” says Indie Shuffle. ‘Here She Comes’ is one of ten tracks all recorded and self-produced in various studios around Auckland, New Zealand in six days. Thomas Bell (The Clean) engineered and mixed the record. In describing their new record lead singer and guitarist, Matthew L. Paul notes that it is a departure from the sunny sounds of their debut EP: “There is a kind of amphetamine-like feel to this record. I think, in terms of the way the songs are played, we were less interested in loud/soft and wanted to create a mechanic type sound and song-presence.”
Ghost Wave’s debut full-length, Ages, is out now on Flying Nun Records. The response to the record has been building since Pitchfork premiered the advance stream of the record. KUTX selected their track “Bootlegs” as their “Song of the Day”, KCRW picked them as an “Artist You Should Know” and KEXP has added the band to their rotation.

Ghost Wave will return to the U.S. in October with an updated 5-piece configuration now featuring Andy Frost (percussion). The band will perform at Culture Collide Festival in Los Angeles and the CMJ Music Marathon in New York City. Dates will be announced soon.

Sasha and Theo are brother and sister. While they draw from a wide range of influences, their music is best informed by the history of two people who grew up sharing a wall: summery Los Angeles weather, the simultaneous comfort and rivalry of family, and just the right hint of nostalgia. The Brother/Sister EP is the band's debut release.

Echosmith might be just starting out on the newest chapter of their career, but that doesn't mean this Los Angeles-based four-piece are strangers to what it takes to make it as a band. In fact, they've known each other their whole lives.
"Music is just what we want to do forever, and we love being in a band with each other," explains singer/guitarist Jamie Sierota. "It's one the most natural ways for us to do music, so we want to stick with doing the band and touring and making records—working together for a long, long time."
The four siblings—Jamie (19), Sydney (15, vocals/keyboard), Noah (17, vocals/bass) and Graham (14, drums)—have been playing together as a band for several years, honing in on their sound and perfecting their collaborative song-writing process.
"There's definitely a lot of factors to balance in this life," adds Sydney. "Finding the balance of family and being in a band. But this is what we want to do."
"Musically," adds Jamie, "we all vibe really well, and as a band, the chemistry's already there."
With balance and chemistry in check, the alt-pop group has time to focus on crafting their songs and preparing their energetic, fan-focused live performances. The band is currently in the studio working on their debut album with producer Mike Elizondo (Tegan And Sara, Gary Clark Jr., Maroon 5), who signed them to Warner Bros. with WBR chairman (and famed fellow producer) Rob Cavallo. And while Echosmith have only been playing together as a band for about four years, they grew up in a musical house, sharing a love for playing instruments and listening to bands as varied as Coldplay, The Smiths, U2, Joy Division and Fleetwood Mac.
Now that Echosmith have refined that sound into what can be described as alt-pop influenced by a lot of early-'80s new wave, they have big plans to share that sound with new fans. Aside from a seven-date run with Owl City this winter, Echosmith will also be playing the first half of this summer's Warped Tour—a rite of passage for many young bands.
"We were super excited when we found out about [Warped Tour]," Jamie says. "So many bands grow from that and just come out of that with tons of fans. We'll brave the heat and it will be a really fun opportunity."
In the meantime, Echosmith will continue to write and record songs for their upcoming debut album. Fans can get a taste of what to expect with "Come Together," which is currently streaming on the band's site, an upbeat song that speaks volumes not only of the band's musical chops but also their attitude about the future trajectory of Echosmith.
"'Come Together' kind of says it all in the title," Jamie explains. "The song's really about coming together when a group of people—especially young people—are getting looked down upon and stuff like that. We can still do things and we can still matter and make a difference."

With their sleek yet gritty brand of alt-bluesy garage rock, Toronto-based five-piece July Talk create rock & roll that’s both boldly intimate and wildly confrontational. Each track in the band’s repertoire is a conversation in song form, with singers Peter Dreimanis and Leah Fay trading lines in a lyrical face-off that’s at turns hot-tempered and tender, reckless and poetic. Onstage that conversation warps into beautiful chaos, thanks to the band’s joyfully unhinged, spontaneity-fueled live performance. And in their music—including the five songs that grace their Island Records debut EP Guns + Ammunition—July Talk piece together supremely heavy riffs, infectious beats, and snakey grooves in a sound that’s savage but seductive.

“With the name of the band, the word ‘talk’ refers to the whole idea of our songs being a conversation, and ‘July’ is about that thing that happens in the summertime when you’re young—how you can meet someone and fall in love and party your face off and then fall out of love and have the happiest and saddest time in your life, all in about three months,” explains Dreimanis, who founded July Talk in 2012 with Fay and fellow guitarist Ian Docherty, bassist Josh Warburton, and drummer Danny Miles. And while Dreimanis’s initial vision for the project centered on that tag-team vocal exchange, Fay notes that July Talk’s emotionally intricate, contradiction-driven dynamic results largely from the band’s raw authenticity. “I think it comes naturally from us living out our intention of being an honest rock band, whether it’s quiet-loud or male-female, or whatever else comes up as we’re expressing what we need to express,” she says.

Even July Talk’s two lead voices are constantly clashing forces, with Dreimanis’s raspy growl scraping up against Fay’s graceful sing-song. On Guns + Ammunition July Talk use those vocals to channel their pure and brutal emotionalism into wickedly sharp and sardonic lyrics. On “Paper Girl,” for instance, Dreimanis attempts to destroy an ex-love with jabs like “You don’t look pretty when you smile/So don’t smile at all” before Fay steps in and serenades him with the sweetly devastating chorus (“And if you want money in your coffee/If you want secrets in your tea/Keep your paper heart away from me”). With its swinging rhythm and sludgy guitar, “Summer Dress” touches on the possible futility of looking for love in the city (“The girls are young, a little dumb/And they’re going it alone”), while the twangy, tough-talking “Garden” is a close-up glimpse at mental unraveling (“I’ve got thoughts that ain’t my own/I’m talking black souls dressed in red/And things that I never shoulda known”). And on the quietly brooding “I’ve Rationed Well” (a song about “creating an idealized version of someone and being nostalgic when they’re gone—basically missing someone who doesn’t exist,” according to Dreimanis), Fay’s hushed vocals entwine with Dreimanis’s stark spoken-word to deliver lines like “We’ll survive by telling lies/We’ve rationed well” to haunting effect.

True to their name, July Talk was born in the summertime, at a Toronto bar lit solely by candlelight in recognition of the anniversary of the 2003 blackout. “There was an acoustic guitar getting passed around and Leah was playing and singing as I came in, and I was just blown away by her,” recalls Dreimanis, who’d recently parted ways with his former band and written a batch of songs intended for dual vocalists. Though the two didn’t connect that night, Dreimanis soon tracked Fay down and sent her a handful of songs he’d recorded in his bedroom. “We were from such different places and going through such different things, it almost felt like it shouldn’t have worked,” says Fay, who previously played in a band/performance-art project called Mothers of Brides (who, as she explains, “tried to distract from the sincerity of our songs by doing things like banging on books with hammers and having people play Jenga onstage during our sets”). Rounding out the lineup with Docherty, Warburton, and Miles (all of whom were former bandmates of Dreimanis), July Talk soon began playing together and expanding the songs Dreimanis had newly developed. “The bands I’d played in before had a Replacements-y sort of influence, very loud and high-energy rock & roll mixed with intoxication, so I wanted to take the manic chaos of that and turn it into something more intimate,” Dreimanis points out.

After finding a manager and setting to work on their debut (a self-titled album released in Canada in autumn 2012), July Talk quickly threw themselves into a frantic touring schedule that’s gone a long way in shaping the sound and soul of the band. “Starting right from when the record came out we were on the road about 90 percent of the time, which we really love,” says Dreimanis. “The stage is where this band lives, and we’ve written our songs in a way that they can change every night and turn into something completely different when we play them live.” When it comes to writing, July Talk tend to retreat to remote and quiet spaces (such as a friend’s house in the woods, where they set up camp last January) and dedicate entire days to working on songs. “All five of us get together and bring ideas to the table and deconstruct them and fight over them and eventually love them, and then Leah and I will work on the lyrics,” says Dreimanis. In that lyric-writing, July Talk aim first and foremost for a certain frankness and uncompromising honesty. “It’s really important to us that we fully illustrate the subject we’re trying to get at in the song, which a lot of the time has to do with what it’s like to be 25 and confused or pissed off or whatever it is that we are,” says Dreimanis. “We try to have the guts to say the kinds of things that most people would hold themselves back from saying.”

Also intensely devoted to the visual element of the band, July Talk have put out a series of self-produced videos directed by Warburton and shot in black and white to mimic their music’s spirit of contrast. According to Fay, that what-you-see-is-what-you-get aesthetic has much to do with “trying to make something people can connect with in a real and direct way.” With recent outings including a spring tour of Europe and stops at summer festivals like the Isle of Wight, connection through live performance is also paramount to the band. “It’s an amazing thing to experience people through rock & roll,” says Fay. “I feel like I’m learning so much by being onstage and getting to look hundreds of different people in the eyes.” And in making those connections, the band members endlessly play off the give-and-take dynamic that stands at the heart of July Talk. “We always see how far we can push each other past our boundaries, figuratively and literally,” says Dreimanis. “Quite early on we realized the audience was totally on board with that, so now how we measure a show is whether we’re able to lose all touch with reality, and create something special that goes way past what anyone’s expectations of us might be.”

resident DJ Jason Eldredge (KCRW/East Village Radio)

With individual taste and a passion for musical risks, Jason Eldredge appeals to the avid music lover as well as the casual fan seeking a soundtrack to their life’s adventures.

Jason’s musical education started at an early age. “It was obvious to everyone around me that I had a real fondness for music, so babysitters and older kids were always feeding me the cornerstone albums of that time."

“Later on in school, my friends would ask me to create mix tapes for their parties. I never really thought that much about it, but other people seemed to realize that I had a knack for it.”

Jason became a “public radio junkie” while living in Chicago listening to WBEZ. He was involved in the local theater scene and finally moved to the West Coast to pursue his acting career. He discovered KCRW and became a volunteer almost immediately. “I showed up to my volunteer interview in a tie and brought along a portfolio. I knew what I wanted and was determined to be involved with the station.”

Jason's desire for accessibility in introducing the newest jam or resurfacing the occasionally forgotten gem brings a mixture of sounds that is consistently varied and original. “I always take chances. Sometimes the things I think people are going to hate end up being what people love the most. That's one of the best parts of my show.”

Jason was previously named by Billboard Magazine as one of the ‘Top 30 Under Thirty’ in the music Industry for his music supervision work in film and television. His credits include: HBO’s Six Feet Under (music coordinator), The Closer for TNT, and Free Radio for VH-1. He has been featured in other print and online publications such as Monocle Magazine, Hamptons Magazine, LA Weekly, and Mashable.

He has deejayed live for the MTV Video Music Awards, Oliver Peoples, Ace Hotels, Soho House, Santos Party House, Flavorpill, The Standard Hotels, The Bowery Hotel, Armani, and The House of Blues.

W Hotels and The Patina Group run exclusive mixes produced by Jason in a variety of their establishments worldwide.

In addition to his work in music, Jason has acted in a variety of commercials, films, and stage productions. He studied acting with the Atlantic Theater Company in New York and completed the BFA acting program at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He has also studied photography at UCLA and recently completed a major candidacy in Art History at Columbia University.

Guest DJ: Chris Douridas (KCRW)

"I plan an interview like a trip," says longtime music curator, radio host, and two-time Grammy nominee Chris Douridas. "I know I'm going to get from here to there, but the side trips and roadside attractions are always the most interesting." Chris' penchant for crossing borders has led him to audiences around the world. Throughout most of the 90's, Chris held the music director position at KCRW. As host of KCRW's popular daily new music program Morning Becomes Eclectic (1990-1998), he was the first to play demos from then-unsigned artists Beck, Gillian Welch and eels, among many others.

While Chris was still in his KCRW role, Geffen Records enlisted him to identify and recruit new artists as an A&R consultant, bringing to the label the bands Remy Zero and That Dog. Two years later, he became an A&R executive at DreamWorks Records where he brought in the eels and Propellerheads, among others.

While at DreamWorks and KCRW, he hosted the debut season of Sessions at West 54th, a weekly PBS music performance and interview program, which bowed in the summer of 1997, and is still in syndication. The show featured interview segments filmed by D.A. Pennebaker, and extended sets from Beck, Fiona Apple, Ben Folds, Sonic Youth, and Zap Mama, along with the television performance debuts of Belle and Sebastian and Jane Siberry, among many others.

Chris is probably best known in film circles as a music supervisor and consultant for major motion pictures and television series, having put together music for Northern Exposure, the Austin Powers series, One Eight Seven, As Good as It Gets, Heat, Grosse Point Blank, Grace of My Heart, American Beauty (GRAMMY nominee for Best Soundtrack), One Hour Photo, Down With Love, The Girl Next Door, The Chumscrubber, Rumor Has It, the record-setting Shrek 2 (GRAMMY nominee for Best Soundtrack) and Bobby, the Robert Kennedy tribute from director Emilio Estevez.

As the new millenium began, Chris set new standards in the online arena as the former VP at AOL Music where he created, produced and hosted the popular Sessions@AOL interview and performance program. For Sessions, Chris interviewed Paul McCartney, U2, Moby, Radiohead, Peter Gabriel, Madonna, Nelly, John Mayer, Sheryl Crow and Avril Lavigne, among hundreds of others.

Also a creative programming consultant for Steve Jobs and Apple's iTunes Music Store, Douridas created and produced the inaugural two years of the live performance and interview series, iTunes Originals, featuring Paul Simon, Jack Johnson, Alanis Morissette, Sting, Willie Nelson, Bjork, PJ Harvey, and others. Additionally, Douridas created and curated the launch of iTunes Essentials, an ongoing series of downloadable music playlists for the iPod culture.

In his voice-over work, Chris was recently heard in the Nissan Shift TV commercial campaign.

He continues his dedication to discovering and nurturing unsigned and forward-leaning artists through his global radio program, heard on KCRW-FM and KCRW.com.

& Matt Goldman (MFG)

MFG Productions is an event production & promotion boutique based in downtown Los Angeles. We have produced influential live music and DJ events since 2006, having averaged over 200 shows per year ranging from 100 to 10,000 people in attendance. Our partners include music festivals, international hotel chains, relevant magazines, influential radio stations, leading beverage brands, and every facet of the apparel industry. We are consistently approached for our understanding of current and future trends in art, fashion, design and, most importantly, music.

“Matt Goldman is an LA nightlife titan, responsible for Thursday’s Dance Right at La Cita and Monday’s School Night at Bardot, as well as the bi-coastal Swimming with Sharks summer pool parties at the NY and LA Standard Hotels. And then there’s the match-made-in-heaven team-ups with Mad Decent and Scion, the one-off after-parties for poised-to-be-huge bands like Foster the People, the secret shows with M.I.A. and Spoon... should we keep going? Because [MFG] is...”
- Excerpted from Paper Magazine Nightlife Issue

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Brooklyn Bowl

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School Night! featuring: with Ghost Wave, Wardell, Echosmith, July Talk, resident DJ Jason Eldredge (KCRW/East Village Radio), Gue...

Sunday, October 20 · Doors 6:00 PM / Show 8:00 PM at Brooklyn Bowl

Off Sale