Trivium & DevilDriver

With their fifth full-length album, In Waves, Trivium make a crucial statement.

It's a statement about writing their own rules about what it means to be a contemporary metal band. It's a statement that encompasses boundary-defying music, moods, movement, and visuals. It's a statement that's emblematic of their evolution. It's a statement that's going to impact anyone open to it.

While on the road in 2009, the first rumblings of In Waves began. Trivium vocalist and guitarist Matt Heafy had already started pondering the direction the band would take for their fifth offering. So far, they'd excelled at the standard hallmarks of the genre, and he wanted to do something new.

Each one of their albums—Ascendancy (2005), The Crusade (2006), and Shogun (2008)—garnered unanimous critical and fan acclaim. Ascendancy cemented the band's place in the metal-verse, selling over half-a-million copies worldwide.

Shogun debuted at #23 on the Billboard Top 200 and in the top 100 in 18 other countries. All over the globe, they rose to the ranks of metal elite, sharing the stage with everyone from Iron Maiden and Slipknot and dominating festivals such as Download, Rock Star Energy Drink Mayhem Festival and OZZfest. They'd done everything the way that a metal band is supposed to. However, even with all of this success, Heafy and his cohorts guitarist Corey Beaulieu, bassist Paolo Gregoletto, and drummer Nick Augusto had gotten frustrated with the state of metal and yearned to break out.

"In my opinion, this album really was a response to what we've ever done as a band and everything we're seeing in contemporary music," declares Heafy. " We want to take metal a step further. We're not going to tell anyone what In Waves means. We want to put imagination and creativity back in the mind of the listener."

Trivium let the music do the talking this time around. The title track and first single hinges on a pummeling polyrhythmic guitar groove that breaks into one of the band's most infectious choruses just before a haunting guitar melody sails off into the distance. Rather than simply modifying their sound, they expanded it with elegant sonic textures and crushingly calculated chaos. The technical prowess is tempered by a melodic sensibility often unexplored by bands in this genre.

About the song, Gregoletto explains, "To me, the 'In Waves' riff is what anger and hopelessness I felt would sound like if emoted musically. It was the first riff I wrote after we got off the road for Shogun, and it's inspirationally somewhere in between the technicality of Meshuggah and the straightforward groove of Sepultura, but it channels a new intensity. After that song, we weren't afraid to push ourselves out of familiar territory anymore."

"It was the turning point for the music," Heafy reveals. "It's got the simplest chorus we've ever had, and it meant something different to each of us. There's minimalist spin."

However, that simplicity breeds complexity as each song takes on a life of its own. "Inception of the End" drops from a speedy thrash air raid into an anthemic arena-filling refrain, while vocal harmonies climb alongside schizophrenic screams on "Watch the World Burn." "Of All These Yesterdays" takes flight on a propulsive hum and an off-kilter solo. Everything culminates during "Leaving This World Behind," which pairs a classically influenced acoustic guitar with a chilling scream and an orchestral, electronic undercurrent. "Built to Fall" shatters an off-time riff with a hyper-charged hook that sees Heafy channeling a new charisma.
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The entire album moves and shifts like one fluid entity. Heafy adds, "There was a conscious effort to tie everything together. Since we pulled back on so much of the musical complexity, it was about the song and we were able to connect on a basic level. It wasn't about trying to insert another big word in the lyrics or another solo. We weren't worried about showing how technical or brutal we could sound. It was about making something great. When I simplified the lyrics, they were able to be translated into multiple definitions, expanding the album to a multi-purposed work of art."

In order to paint this aural pastiche, the band retreated to Paint It Black Studios in Altamonte Springs, FL with production triumvirate Colin Richardson [Machine Head, Bullet for My Valentine], Martyn "Ginge" Ford and Carl Bown in early 2011. The band had already conceived the vision for the album over two years of writing and volleying visual concepts around, so recording allowed the band to continue to experiment. Surprisingly, Heafy didn't turn to his iPod for inspiration though.

"On this record, my influences weren't music," he explains. "My influences were film and directors like David Lynch, Lars Von Trier, Paul Thomas Anderson, and Christopher Nolan. It was also the idea of modern art. I used to not get modern art and museums. I went to The Louvre four years ago and it got me into classical art. Then I started getting into modern art. I like modern art because it completely disregards all of the pre-set rules. Contemporary art can be anything. There is no right or wrong. That encouraged me on In Waves. We made the music we wanted to make."

In order to keep pushing the envelope, Trivium experimented with a myriad of sounds and textures, employing everything from cardboard tubes, fire extinguishers, napkins, and out-of-tune pianos to make sounds. Working with new drummer Nick Augusto in the studio also helped facilitate the process. Beaulieu exclaims, "Nick's a fantastic drummer, and he soaked everything up really quickly. We moved at such a fast pace together and we were able to accomplish a lot more in a short amount of time. It was a very creative, fast-moving, and enjoyable experience. Having that positive environment with Nick made it a lot more fun and it made the songs better."

However, the songs will ultimately continue to get better as their vision comes into clearer focus. Heafy sums it up best. "If a CD is like the soundtrack to a movie, In Waves is the entire film. It's everything. It's the soundtrack, the visuals, and the packaging. It's a full-on visual experience rather than being the standard format. The whole purpose of art is to inspire creativity and other art. No one made the album we wanted to hear yet so we made it ourselves. It's time to take metal to another place and bring in new people."

Since they formed in 2002, DevilDriver have enjoyed a slow, steady career build. Their self-titled 2003 debut was a crushing introduction to a new breed of extremity, spearheaded by the distinctive vocal ferocity of front man, Dez Fafara. The band's 2005 follow-up, Fury of Our Maker's Hand was more musically accomplished and experimental. But with their new album, The Last Kind Words, DevilDriver has taken a quantum leap up the evolutionary metal scale, crafting an album that's simultaneously brutal, melodic, technically complex yet instantly accessible.

"We wanted to do something that was different than what we did on the first two records, and would stand out" Fafara says. "We wanted to keep our sound alive, but at the same time, move on. So, we knew that everyone needed to step up to the plate and push themselves to their fullest extent."

The members of DevilDriver did exactly that, and then some. The Last Kind Words is the kind of album that grips you by the throat, and doesn't let go for nearly an hour. It's punishing and uncompromising, distilling the creative vision of the band members into songs that pummel like victims of violent crime seeking revenge on their assailants. At the same time, each song is chock full of hooks that keep listeners pinned in place for the next round of bludgeoning.

From the first listen to songs like "Not All Who Wander Are Lost," which features jackhammer beats, chugging thrash riffs and biting death grind, or the epic architecture of "These Fighting Words," a precise and militaristic melee between marching volleys of hate and triumphant Wagnerian melodies, it's clear that DevilDriver have realized their full potential. "Bound by the Moon" is graced with ravaging double-bass drums and sinister guitar harmonies, "Call to the Throne" compliments down- tuned clamor with multi-part pinch-harmonics and penetrating, machine gun riffs. And the title track embellishes trenchant beats and start-stop rhythms with harrowing, spare piano.

"When I listen to something like Pantera's Vulgar Display of Power record, it still sounds great because it stands up over time," Fafara says. "I want this record to do that as well. Fifteen years from now I want people go, 'Listen to that shit. It's heavy, but it's still catchy and it totally captures the essence and groove of DevilDriver.' It's of the utmost importance that we clarify our sound for the masses on this one."

Fafara came up with the title of the album after writing the lyrics, "The last kind words will be/ You will live below angels and above beasts." The couplet addresses the predicament of being human, a theme that is at the much blackened heart of the record. "Out of all the things we could have been put on this earth as, being human is not good," Fafara explains. "It's like, okay, now you're stuck here with all these emotions and feelings and you gotta keep yourself afloat. The suicide rate has more than doubled in the U.S. in the recent past, so this album is about being motivated to stand up to the punishment of being a human and to have the character in you to go on when all people want to do is hold you down."

DevilDriver started working on the new songs in 2005, soon after the release of Fury of Our Maker's Hand. The band members wrote riffs on the bus, backstage in clubs and in hotels, and Fafara scribbled down lyrics whenever and wherever felt inspired. By the time DevilDriver entered their practice space last year to assemble the songs, they already had a firm grip on the material.

"It was important that we not throw this all together at a moment's notice," Fafara says. "We spent our time on these songs and were way more prepared to go into the studio than we've ever been before. There were songs where I had two sets of lyrics written lyrically and everyone had backup riffs, too, in case something needed to be changed. Fortunately, nothing did."

In mid-November 2006, DevilDriver entered the studio with producer Jason Suecof (Trivium, Chimaira) and recorded the entire album in less than a month. They were originally planning to spend more time on it, but Suecof decided they were so prepared they didn't need to do pre-production, and he worked so quickly that, before they knew it, they were finished. "We just demoed the shit out of the songs until the were near perfect. We walked into Sonic Ranch and started recording with a clear vision," says guitarist Jeff Kendrick.

"The vibe in there was so amazing," recalls Fafara. "I've never seen someone track so fast in my life. And, he wasn't rushing; he was just capturing the moment and moving on. A lot of what you hear on the record is first takes, which is cool because when you do take after take, it can suck the life right out of a song. Jason really captured this band."

The lyrics on The Last Kind Words demonstrate just as much development as the music. Instead of screaming with blind rage, Fafara expresses his knowledge and experiences, and reveals there's much more to his character than dark mysticism and misanthropy. "Not All Who Wander Are Lost," for instance, looks at life through the eyes of someone determined to live in the moment. "A lot of people get overwhelmed with life and what they're going to do 20 years from now, and often they're the ones who are going to die early from heart attack and stress," Fafara says. "I'm one of the person who look at things on a daily basis and doesn't get swept up in what's yet to come."

By contrast, "Clouds Over California" tells a more personal story about the demise of friendship and the need to sweep up the dust and move on. "Today I swore that I wouldn't mourn ya/ Curse the clouds over California," screams Fafara over a backdrop of tumbling beats and buzzsaw guitars. "It's about being friends with someone for a long, long time and then finally just going, You know what? This isn't working. I'm done with this. Don't call me anymore."

With The Last Kind Words, DevilDriver have not just raised the bar, they have perfected their high-jump. Instead of just striving for the top they have outreached even their own expectations and delivered an album that puts them in an entirely different sonic realm. Without sacrificing heaviness, DevilDriver have become more melodic, without sacrificing accessibility - adding poignant complexity to their ever-evolving sound. After many years of extensive touring, DevilDriver have shaped their career on inspiration and remain diligent artists, with no airs or pretension. Drummer John Boecklin comments, "This is our most extreme, interesting and complete album so far. We focused on adding a bit more complexity to the structure of the tunes. I think fans will find a more mature DevilDriver with this album."

The Last Kind Words are an affirming testament to DevilDrivers' on-going metamorphosis - combining the diverse influences shared by the entire band with a steady focus on song-craft. Transcending expectations, The Last Kind Words offers a fresh sound from a band that has firmly planted their place in the extreme music landscape. After years of touring and releasing records, DevilDriver have honed in the essence of their songwriting potential, with what has been described by the band as "...by far the best DevilDriver record we have made."

After The Burial

An uninhibited eight-stringed dual barrage of frenetic riffs and dynamic chord progression is exactly what the crushing new AFTER THE BURIAL delivers with pinpoint precision. The highly acclaimed new album, In Dreams, is quickly going to raise the bar for all others within the metal genre as this group effectively unleashes a frenzy of jaw-dropping dual guitar dynamics that is backed by a captivating energy and groove resulting in an overall unrelenting output of punishment. This Minnesota quintet is hell-bent on forging their own unique path within the extreme metal genre and In Dreams proves that they are well on their way to that very goal.

Justin (guitars) states: "We've spent the last year putting all of our hard work into this album, and we can assure you that the intricate dynamics of In Dreams will satisfy your appetite for the crushing guitars, driving drums and powerful vocals you've come to expect from us."

AFTER THE BURIAL spent the winter of 2010 touring relentlessly across North America on the "December Decimation" tour. This group has something for everyone that pleases the tech nuts while providing an entertaining stage show that is sure to always get the metalcore kids into a violent frenzy. This is a band that thrives on the road and tours relentlessly across the world non-stop. This is an extreme metal hybrid that is a voracious assault on all the senses forcing your brain to fire on all cylinders in order to process the amount of material that is currently being pounded into your ears. This is thinking man's metal and it's not for the weak minded.

AFTER THE BURIAL's highly acclaimed sophomore album, Rareform, hinted at their true potential, but In Dreams brings all of their combined talents to fruition. The disc opens with a freight train of brutality and sheer brute force busting out at the seams and never lets up on the gas for a split second. Each track will keep you on your toes guessing what might possibly be next in this never-ending array of intensity. This is essentially a roller coaster of unconventionality, so strap yourself in tight and prepare for a wild ride.

In Dreams is going to redefine the genre and position AFTER THE BURIAL as the forerunners of the new extreme progressive movement.

Green Death

“this Des Moines outfit plays a classy brand of classic thrash a la Testament, Heathen and Pantera with a little Type O Negative in there as well as a singer who can sing and everything,” - DECIBEL Magazine

A way to describe Green Death: Danzig and Peter Steele (Type O Negative) had a baby, and that baby listens to a lot of Slayer!

3 guys working together for over a decade.
In 2013, the addition of bassist, Parker Willis joins the lineup.

$20.00 - $23.00

Tickets

www.trivium.com & www.devildriver.com

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Trivium & DevilDriver with After The Burial, Thy Will Be Done, Green Death

Tuesday, November 12 · Doors 5:30 PM / Show 6:30 PM at Wooly's