A wise man once said that a prophet is never honored in his own country. And so it has been with Capleton. While the veteran DJ‚s words and works long ago earned him the title of "The Prophet", the respect and honor that should rightfully be his have been a long time coming. Anytime you try to uplift righteousness and upliftment of the people them, then you ah go get a fight, says the hottest entertainer in the worldwide reggae fraternity. "Bob Marley come do it and them fight him. And when Bob Marley dead, that's when they start to endorse him. I already aware of this, I am not unaware. So I know the more them fight I is the more I get stronger" In the fast-moving world of dancehall reggae, fame and success are hard to obtain and easy to lose. Fans can be fickle, and trends change in the blink of an eye, leaving most entertainers with painfully short career spans. Only a rare few can remain relevant from year to year, holding their audience's attention and leaving them crying for more. His lyrics are deep, precise, and thoughtful. His stage shows are nothing less than dynamic, explosive performances. But his remarkable staying power and longevity may be Capleton's greatest gift.

Born Clifton George Bailey III on April 13, 1967, in the rural parish of St. Mary, Capleton earned his future stage name from friends who were so impressed with his sharp reasoning skills that they named him after the most famous lawyer in town. From a tender young age, he was a lover of the traveling sound systems, sneaking out at night to catch the vibes until dawn. But it wasn't until he turned 18 and moved to Kingston that he was able to realize his destiny.

It was Stewart Brown, owner of a Toronto-based sound called African Star, who gave the untested artist his first break, flying him to Canada for a stage show alongside giants like Ninjaman and Flourgon. The audience poured out their appreciation, and he never looked back. When Capleton first burst on the scene in the late 1980s, the dancehall was a very different place than it is today. Slackness and gun talk were the order of the day. This bright promising newcomer announced his arrival with a string of hit songs from "Bumbo Red" to "Number One on the Look Good Chart" and "Lotion Man." Everything he touched hit the sound-good charts, and the youthful artist with the nimble vocabulary and hardcore voice quickly established himself as one of dancehall‚s most reliable hitmakers. But even he could not have predicted that eleven years later, at the start of the new millennium, he would be dancehall's ruling voice.

"I think the people dem see say me really deserve that because of the amount of years me put in," Capleton says, "and we never really bow and we still hold the faith. We stand up for whatever we a say. Yeah and we really work for it. And them say by your works, a so you get your pay. The people them see the amount of fight me face and the whole heap of accusation. And me still never give up"

When he dropped the tune "Alms House" in 1992, Capleton established himself as more than an entertainer but as a guiding light of righteousness through music. "United we stand and divided we fall," he sang for the benefit of his fans and dancehall comrades. "Nuff of them nah go know themself till them back against the wall." A few years later he came back with yet another antidote to the clashing and rivlary that had taken hold of the dancehall business. "Music is a mission," he reminded his fellow artists, "not a competition. Some man use the music to cause confusion." The path of this dancehall Prophet was clearly established in 1994 with a string of songs that declared his newfound faith in Rastafari. "INI sight up the light and see say really, yunno, Rasta is real," he recalls. "founder of the world, because Rasta did come set the trend. Y‚unnerstand. Rasta is life."

The first words of his mega-hit "Dis The Trinity" made it plain that the DJ had experienced some kind of revelation. "I was once lost but now I‚m found," he stated, "Selassie I live every time." Capleton became a strong advocate of the teaching of the Jamaican National Hero, Marcus Mosiah Garvey, founder of the Universal Negro Improvement Association and advocate of universal black repatriation. "Babylon rewarded us with hatred for our love," he declares. "They taught us to rape, steal and kill. For instance, they stole our literature and taught it back to us in a different manner so as to infiltrate our minds with foolishness and other misconceptions. Now we as black men do not see ourselves as prince and prophets, but as punks and guys. Our women do not see themselves as queens, princesses or empresses anymore, but as harlots and concubines." The only solution, as Bob Marley advocated, is to emancipate oneself from mental slavery.

"Over the years INI as a nation and a people, them no really teach INI nuttin‚ bout INI black self. You know I mean? Them teach INI them give we European philosophy. So INI and some other youths a try emerge now, we ask certain question and we ask fi certain things. Caw we know say an institute, or in a college, or in a certain organization we need we Ethiopian curriculum, we need the black man thing. We need to know about weself. Becaw the prophet Marcus Garvey did show we say, A nation without no knowledge of them own history is like a tree without a root. And if you don‚t know where you‚re coming from, you‚re not gonna know where you‚re going."

Even as he uplifts the black race, Capleton always makes a point of clarifying that he does not seek to alienate any race. "We are not being racial nor prejudiced star," he says. "Becaw we know Jah is for everyone. But where history and prophesy in concerned, that is our witness and we have to be ourself, and we cannot hide from the truth. Caw we woulda be a traitor and a sellout to ourself. And you cannot sell out yourself."

Soon thereafter came the song "Tour" a blazing state of the dancehall report written in the weeks following the slaying of Panhead and Dirtsman, two of Capleton's fellow artists. That song not only became an anthem of the roots revival within the dancehall, but a hip hop flavored remix of that song hit the Billboard charts, opening up a huge new audience to Capleton's messages of righteousness.

There followed a relationship with Def Jam records, who released two Capleton albums, Prophecy and I-Testament, which featured memorable collaborations with rap stars like Method Man and Q-Tip. Both records were warmly accepted by the international audience, but as the millennium drew to a close, Capleton sensed that it was time to return to his core audience. He had work to do. "I have to be myself, right? And I only can be me," he reasons. "So whichever way fi make me be me, I work with dat. Y'understand."

Capleton is now at the height of his powers. 1999 and 2000 have brought a ceaseless string of sound system favorite and dancehall chart toppers like the anti-violence anthem "Jah Jah City" and "Good In Her Clothes," a message of respect for the sisters who carry themselves like Empresses rather than. But even as he completes his mission of upliftment, Capleton has had many critics. One of his biggest hits, in fact, is addressed the naysayers in the press and the ivory towers of power. "Critics won't leave I alone," chats the Prophet. "They say they can't take the fire weh me put pon Rome"

Many of Capleton's songs "and most of his critics" make mention of this blazing fire. Capleton hopes to clear up the confusion once and for all. "Is not really a physical fire. Is really a spiritual fire, and a wordical fire, and a musical fire. You see the fire is all about a livity. But is people get it on the wrong term. People get confused.So when a man say 'more fire' him think that mean say you fi go light the cane field or go light the church." Fire, Capleton explains, is a way of reminding one‚s brother that they are going astray. "That way a man know say him doing something wrong. That even give him the urge to know say Yo check up on yourself. What you're doing is not right, or else him would not say 'Fire fi dat,' or 'Burn dat' or 'More fire.'" "If we go check it back now," he continues, "fire is for the purification of earth, anyhow you check it. This earth itself have to even emerge from the literal fire also, which is the volcanic activity, we a talk bout lava. The hottest element to rise us in the morning is the sun. The water cleanse, but it's still the support from the fire that burn the water, burn out of the bacteria so the water coulda heal we fi cleanse. The herb heal, but it's still the fire fi burn the herb so the herb coulda heal we also." {Bio is courtesy of Rob Kenner} (www.vprecords.com)

New Kingston is a young vocalist/instrumentalist group, that consists of three brothers. Tahir a.k.a. SLIM, the youngest member on keyboards/vocals. Courtney on drums/vocals and Stephen a.k.a SUKI, the oldest on guitar/vocals. This group fuses their reggae sound with modern [op, jazz and R&B music, to create their sound, which they term, "Reggae Crossover." New Kingston has been in the industry for some time now and some might call them, "young veterans"! The group is led by its founder/manager and father Courtney LJ Panton. New Kingston started off working with many artists such as, Collie Buddz, Mr.Vegas, Morgan Heritage, Sister Carol, Shabba Ranks, and many more. But, while working with all of these artists, manager Courtney LJ Panton had another vision. He had an ulterior motive for New Kingston, which was for them to rise to the top as a solo act and stand alone, capturing the love of the people. This helped to create their sound, dubbed, "Reggae Crossover". A blend of sounds, to everyone's liking, while still sticking to their heritage. Reggae! Now this group is sharing the stage with many artists around the world from Europe, to the Americas and beyond. New Kingston is currently set to release their second album, "In The Streets". The album features two of their singles that are gaining radio recognition globally. "In The Streets", the title track of the album and "Pon Di Wall", which is on the Ting-ah-Ling riddim revamped and remade by New Kingston!

Sometimes the moment of clarity becomes something continual, rather than an instant. For Denver rock reggae/ska outfit, P-Nuckle, that evolution is about to be more apparent than ever. A matured sense of lucidity, coupled with the experience of a musical career spanning over a decade, has the group poised and ready for national ascent. Known for a dedicated passion for delivering messages of hope and triumph over adversity has allowed the band to cultivate an extremely loyal fanbase; one that is sure to grow with the release of the band's fourth studio album, "Stand Up and Bitch". Slotted for a release this fall, the album will give fans a direct glimpse of a full-grown set of ideals from one of Colorado's most recognized bands. With eclectic musical influences ranging from Dancehall Reggae to straight ahead punk rock, P-Nuckle has always created a memorable live experience. While their next album may be a bit more mature, don't expect any less intense of a live show. The band is ready to celebrate the journey that has created this album with a beefed up tour schedule. The national P-Nuckle family of fans, affectionately known as "Nuckleheads" will get the chance to see more of the band, then they have in the past year, and have every opportunity to be a part of the vibe of a P-Nuckle show. There are some bands that are a part of the times, and then there are some bands that create the times. Get ready for P-Nuckle!!!

Bushy Bush

Dj Bushy bush Government Calvin Wynter second and last child to mamma Yvonne. Born in Spanish Town St Catherine Jamaica june 6 1979. The Time I spent growing up in Jamaica make me the person who I am today, When I was 10 years old my moms decided that it was time for me and my brother to move to the states so we moved to Brookly NY in 1992. My whole life change everything seems bigger, more opportunity everthing was more easy. I give thanks every day that I have the Mother that I have She did it by herself without my father, i consider my moms daddy and mommy. In 1995 I went to Jersey to visit Family and I got linked up with a Local sound system based in Somerset name Desperado, This was the start of something great. I took time to learned the business, time to listen and learn from other selectors that was apart of the sound. Unfortunately Desparado was short live so i knew i had to keep it moving I took a 2 years break god bless me with a little baby boy i had to spend the time with him just to watch him grow and learn, i have no regrets. I use music to voice my opinion music is a big part of my life i couldnt give it up i had to get back out there. being the go getta that i am and the striver for better i wanted to do somthing bigger than i ever done with my music career. I link up with a Jersey Base promotor name Smiley this dude was huge he started what allot of dem now a days wanna be sounds is doing in jersey today. Snowhite sound system is the sound that is responsible for my career, I've played with sounds like Stone Love, Metro Media, Bass Oddysie, just to name a few i am not a just come Dj I've put in my time and i will continue to do this i love what i do and this is why i do it. Starting out as a DJ have help me to learn and understand what it takes to make good music and appreciate these artist for what they are doing. Five years ago i couldnt write a good song but the time that i've put in with playing and learning music has enable me to do this. I love Djing and i will continue to do it but my goal right now is to push my own music. .. .. ..

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Capleton w/ New Kingston, P-Nuckle and Bushy Bush

Wednesday, October 23 · Doors 9:00 PM at Cervantes' Other Side

Tickets Available at the Door