Tera Melos

The history of Tera Melos, like the life of Dostoevsky, treads between transcendence and complete breakdown. In the early quartet years, live performances were as much about gymnastics and daredevilry as they were about actual performance. Bursts of hyper-musicianship sprouted between larger expanses of equipment-trashing, mid-measure cartwheeling, and death-defying rafter-swinging. The evolution from a four-piece to a trio saw the visual chaos reigned in and the aural chaos blossom. Destruction is no longer measured in terms of kicked over amps, bloody fingers, and broken bones. Instead, the deconstructive edge is embodied in Dada-ist pop appropriations, pedal wankery, noise squalls, and frenetic tempos.

Mutation is key. Tera Melos now is not Tera Melos four years ago. Or six months ago. A song isn't played in a dingy club the same way it was played in the recording studio. Nor is it played the same way it was the night before. Things evolve. Wrong is right. The glitches, improvisations, and general tomfuckery are part of the art and charm. You want clarity? Perfection? Easy hooks? You'll have to work a little harder than that. This is not casual listening.

A new phase of Tera Melos is born with the addition of John Clardy to the drum throne. Flanked by the cumulative ten strings of Nathan Latona and Nick Reinhart, one can only wonder what new amalgam of sonic confusion, modernist anxiety, and cosmic celebration is brewing in those hills outside of Sacramento.

It's the end of the current tour for Fang Island, who have been doing the rounds over the preceding weeks aided and abetted by No Spill Blood. Hailing from Rhode Island, Fang Island specialize in a type of infectious, no frills guitar music that marks them out as the greatest band on earth. Okay, they're not the greatest band on earth, but they might well be the most enjoyable band to rock out to on your headphones. The band's ethos is simple – create the sound of "everyone high-fiving everyone." While we have no idea how this might sound, if it's measured through musical notation then this is probably it.

Things are buzzing nicely as Fang Island hit the stage. This gig was upgraded from The Grand Social to a post-midnight slot here in The Button Factory, so folk are by now well-readied from the previous band and the previous beers. There is no rest for NSB's Lar Kaye, double-jobbing on bass guitar for the headliner's set, and from the off it's head-shaking stuff with The Illinois. Seek It Out comes in with a distorted intro before scaling back, and an anthemic Life Coach follows. With two albums to their name, the band dips in to both through the set. 'Major' song Chompers is all finger-tapping, snare-rattling excellence – the song's upward key change is the single greatest moment of this weekend. The band stop, barley pause for breath and delve straight back into the rock-out ending.

In advance of Sideswiper, the band ask that "everybody put your hands up in the air and high-five the person next to you!" Most do. Dooney Rock is a folk-style stomper, and a bit of armlock barn-dancing breaks out down in front, until the song speeds up to beyond dancing capabilities. Welcome Wagon maintains the momentum, and you would be hard pressed to pick Kaye out as a stand-in, rocking out as he does every bit as much as the three Fang Islanders. Strobe lights flash – it's a commendable light show for all bands tonight – and a few crowd-surfers fight a losing battle with the bouncers, as the set comes to an end.

Fang Island, not do an encore? Highly unlikely, and out they come with discordant noise and guitar wails. This is the most sedate part of the night, until the song slowly builds into power chord-y goodness and freaks out. A tom assault begins a rollicking, unexpected cover of Thin Lizzy's Sitamoia, and it's a fitting end to a night of serious noise rock and good-time tuneage. Fang Island may well be the least cynical band on the planet – we hope they revisit our corner of it again in a timely fashion.

It's the end of the current tour for Fang Island, who have been doing the rounds over the preceding weeks aided and abetted by No Spill Blood. Hailing from Rhode Island, Fang Island specialize in a type of infectious, no frills guitar music that marks them out as the greatest band on earth. Okay, they're not the greatest band on earth, but they might well be the most enjoyable band to rock out to on your headphones. The band's ethos is simple – create the sound of "everyone high-fiving everyone." While we have no idea how this might sound, if it's measured through musical notation then this is probably it.

Things are buzzing nicely as Fang Island hit the stage. This gig was upgraded from The Grand Social to a post-midnight slot here in The Button Factory, so folk are by now well-readied from the previous band and the previous beers. There is no rest for NSB's Lar Kaye, double-jobbing on bass guitar for the headliner's set, and from the off it's head-shaking stuff with The Illinois. Seek It Out comes in with a distorted intro before scaling back, and an anthemic Life Coach follows. With two albums to their name, the band dips in to both through the set. 'Major' song Chompers is all finger-tapping, snare-rattling excellence – the song's upward key change is the single greatest moment of this weekend. The band stop, barley pause for breath and delve straight back into the rock-out ending.

In advance of Sideswiper, the band ask that "everybody put your hands up in the air and high-five the person next to you!" Most do. Dooney Rock is a folk-style stomper, and a bit of armlock barn-dancing breaks out down in front, until the song speeds up to beyond dancing capabilities. Welcome Wagon maintains the momentum, and you would be hard pressed to pick Kaye out as a stand-in, rocking out as he does every bit as much as the three Fang Islanders. Strobe lights flash – it's a commendable light show for all bands tonight – and a few crowd-surfers fight a losing battle with the bouncers, as the set comes to an end.

Fang Island, not do an encore? Highly unlikely, and out they come with discordant noise and guitar wails. This is the most sedate part of the night, until the song slowly builds into power chord-y goodness and freaks out. A tom assault begins a rollicking, unexpected cover of Thin Lizzy's Sitamoia, and it's a fitting end to a night of serious noise rock and good-time tuneage. Fang Island may well be the least cynical band on the planet – we hope they revisit our corner of it again in a timely fashion.

Zorch is a duo from Austin, TX. Composed of Zac Traeger (keyboards, omnichord, vocals) and Shmu (drums, omnichord, vocals), the two hail from Wisconsin and Canada respectively. The duo met in Boston and began recording dozens of improvisational mixtapes, which, after moving to Austin in 2009, would help lay the foundation for Zorch. Since that pivotal move, they've quickly made a home for themselves in the city's DIY scene, building a reputation on their intense and visual live shows and fan interaction.

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Tera Melos with Fang Island, Fang Island, Zorch

Saturday, November 2 · Doors 7:00 PM / Show 8:00 PM at Rock & Roll Hotel