With 2 million paid song downloads through their site MuleTracks, seven critically acclaimed studio records already released, a handful of DVDs and live albums, plus an ever-expanding fanbase and sold-out coast-to-coast tours, Gov't Mule could easily rest on its laurels.
Yet when you're in one of the hardest working bands in rock history, pushing yourself to greater heights always supersedes cashing in on past successes.

For guitarist/lead vocalist Warren Haynes and his band, Gov't Mule, creating a new album is akin to walking a tightrope: Write new songs that please old fans, while hopefully garnering new ones. Develop that material in the studio rather than on the road, to prevent premature leaks via the internet. Celebrate the roots of American music, yet take sonic forays into the future. Honor the memory of the late Allen Woody, while simultaneously welcoming new bassist Jorgen Carlsson into the fold.

With By A Thread, Gov't Mule's first studio album in three years, recorded at Willie Nelson's Pedernales Studio in the Texas Hill Country, the band – which also features drummer Matt Abts and multi-instrumentalist Danny Louis – meets those challenges and more.

"It feels like we're moving forward and backward at the same time," Haynes notes. "Hardcore fans tend to not want us to move too far away from where we started, but the band never wants to stay in one place for very long."

"While Jorgen brings his distinctive musical personality to the table, he also uncannily evokes some of (Allen) Woody's spirit which inspired us to revisit our past."

"I don't know if we were willing to travel that road right after Allen died," says Haynes, "but this far down the line, it seems liberating and exciting."

From the opening licks of "Broke Down On The Brazos," a hard-hitting up-tempo Texas stomp that features ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons' unmistakable fretwork, through the meditative closing ballad, "World Wake Up," it's clear that Gov't Mule is intent on plowing new ground.

"There was this groove that Matt and Jorgen were playing the first day in the studio," Haynes recalls. "We taped it, and when the occasion came up for us to start writing something new, we pulled it out, and it became the catalyst for that tune. Danny and I started attacking it, Gordie Johnson [the album's producer] got involved, and during a break I went next door and began writing the lyrics."

That organic approach is evident throughout the 11-song album, which runs the rock-and-roll gamut from barroom blues to pyschedelia (check the disintegrated chords of the '60s throwback "Inside Outside Woman Blues #3") to melody-driven tunes like "Frozen Fear". The band's approach was simple: Sequester themselves at the studio, located 45 minutes from Austin, to avoid any unnecessary distractions. Ignore the clock and let loose some freeform jams. Capitalize on the chemistry that was already developing between Carlsson and Abts. Write new material, as Haynes describes, "from the ground up."

"Writing in the studio was a lot of pressure, but it worked out great. For whatever reason, the time seemed right. The door was kicked open, and now we're moving full steam ahead."

Once that metaphorical door was unlocked, Gov't Mule proved unstoppable in the studio.

"Warren had some sketches of songs, and some fully finished songs, but what made this session special was that the band co-wrote four songs on the spot," Abts says. "What we were thinking 14 years ago, when the band started, doesn't necessarily apply to 2009. We've gone through some changes, but that's a good thing, like any relationship that changes over time. Jorgen has given us such a shot in the arm. I'm really excited about the new record – it's the best thing we've ever done."

The experience, says the Swedish-born Carlsson, who joined Gov't Mule last January, was better than anyone could've imagined.

"I play in a lot of high-pressure studio sessions in L.A.," he says, "but this felt so natural. It was fun. I played as good as I could, and I can't wait to see what happens next."

Louis agrees.

"As long as I've been playing music, it still feels like a little miracle when the creative spirit kicks in," he says. "'Steppin' Lightly' came together with all four of us huddled around in a circle. I came out from behind the keyboards and played guitar, so physically, we were closer than we were before. 'Any Open Window' was the same thing – for the first time, not only was Jorgen involved on the ground floor of the tune, but we broke it down to a two-guitar band."

As Gov't Mule picks up speed, however, the band has never lost sight of its roots.

Exhibit A: "Railroad Boy," a 100-year old folk song Haynes learned as a teenager in Asheville, N.C. and transformed into a rollicking, organ- and guitar-driven romp.

"The tradition, melody and story of that tune are so strong, that somehow, it's never left my brain," explains Haynes, also a member of the Dead and the Allman Brothers Band, and one of Rolling Stones' Top 25 Greatest Guitarists of All Time.

"I thought, why don't we work up a rock-and-roll arrangement, and see what happens. It came together really quickly – when that happens, it's always a good sign. Everybody's input was spot-on. The timelessness of that song was inherent; what we add is the freshness. Gov't Mule plays a modern day version of that music – not a tribute, but a continuation."

On the next track, "Monday Mourning Meltdown," Gov't Mule downshifts into a moody, contemporary rock ballad.

"It's a personal statement for me," Haynes avows. "Sonically, it's different from anything we've ever done. We experimented with a lot of different approaches, and in some ways, this song really showcases the growth of the band and represents a new direction for us."

Now that the finishing touches have been placed on By A Thread, the musicians of Gov't Mule anxiously await its late summer release.

"These songs didn't exist until we got to Pedernales," Abts says. "No one's heard 'em yet, which is kind of frustrating."

Vintage Trouble

Vintage Trouble formed in 2010 out of the ashes of a few other bands, and not by chance, Ty Taylor (vocal) and Nalle Colt (guitar) teamed up with drummer Richard Danielson and bassist Rick Barrio Dill. They entered The Bomb Shelter Studio, recorded an album's worth of material in three days, which was intended to be demos and ended up being pressed into CDs. The Bomb Shelter Sessions became Vintage Trouble's first album. Selling it at their gigs was easy and not surprisingly so were the calls to feature their music in several commercial media.

With a unified decision to stay in Los Angeles to build their musical foundation as a band, weekly residences in the area lead to a large assembly of fans in a short amount of time. These fans became known as the "TroubleMakers." It was that underground buzz that lead to legendary manager Doc McGhee taking notice and signing Vintage Trouble to his roster after hearing only a single chorus. Doc's first order of business became breaking the band in England, right away. Their first venture overseas resulted in a similar groundswell with Music Weekly naming them 2011 Breakout Artist of the Year and HMV hailing them as their "Next Big Thing."

Their return to the U.S. and Harvelle's was nothing short of epic, with a line forming down the block before the club even opened. Vintage Trouble felt the homecoming as a true testament to their fans' dedication at spreading the word and sharing their music. The crowd inside was just as amped; young and old, newbies and old faithful, all anticipating the transference of energy from the band to their soles. Vintage Trouble didn't disappoint. The next day the band would be on a plane back to London to appear on Later… with Jools Holland. This performance was one of the most talked about of the year, blowing up Twitter as the 6th most tweeted topic worldwide just hours after the show. The very next day, their self-released debut, The Bomb Shelter Sessions entered the charts, becoming the No. 1 "R&B Album" and No. 2 "Rock Album" on Amazon UK—No. 6 on Amazon overall and No. 13 on iTunes, charting in the "UK Top 40" by the time it was officially released in July.

The band went on to play 80 shows in 100 days in front of an estimated 400,000 people throughout the UK and Germany. The next three months brought them an opportunity playing theaters, opening for Brian May's Anthems Tour, and then as the support for Bon Jovi in stadiums and arenas on the UK, Ireland and German legs of the tour, playing to over 200,000 people in just under two weeks—all the while headlining smaller venues, after-hours clubs, and pubs. Guitarist Magazine ran a feature about Nalle, and The Bomb Shelter Sessions was named one of the "Top 25 Guitar Albums of the Year" by Total Guitar Magazine. They won the Classic Rock Award for "Best New Band of 2011"—an honor that German Music Magazine would also bestow upon them.

Things exploded around their penultimate show in Glasgow. The demand for tickets was so great that they were bumped up from a 500 seat venue to play for over 800 freshly converted "TroubleMakers." Ty was invited to front Queen for Freddie Mercury's 65th birthday celebration in London, setting the stage for Vintage Trouble to embark on their third overseas tour, with destinations including Italy, Germany, Paris, Belgium, and the Netherlands. They played Hyde Park Main Stage twice in eight days (The Wireless Festival and Hard Rock Calling). They were featured on Sky News, recorded an MTV The Studio Sessions with Tony Visconti, in addition to 17 live radio sessions throughout the tour, including Radio 2- Janice Long, 6 Music With Craig Charles, Q Radio, BBC Radio London and BBC Radio Scotland.

2012 proved to be just as busy. The band sold out The Troubadour in Los Angeles and took up residencies at both The Cosmopolitan and Hard Rock Hotels in Las Vegas. Their first video "Nancy Lee," filmed entirely with an iPhone, won at the Original iPhone Film Fest, not just taking the Music Video category, but the festival's grand prize as well. In February, Google Music selected Vintage Trouble as the featured artist at Sundance where their live performance rocked the film community and they made their first appearance in Rolling Stone. Their too-brief Australian tour included the Sydney Festival and the Australian Film Awards and was met with such an overwhelming response that a return trip is guaranteed sooner rather than later. Vintage Trouble's SXSW showcase in Austin was named "the fourth best live performance of the festival" by Paste Magazine (only behind The Jesus and Mary Chain, Jack White and Bruce Springsteen). In celebration of the official U.S. release of The Bomb Shelter Sessions, Best Buy also featured Vintage Trouble on their TV screens in stores nationwide.

The release of The Bomb Shelter Sessions, combined with their electric live show has catapulted Vintage Trouble into the US limelight, earning them a sponsorship by Supercuts, an iTunes rock download of the week for new song "Pelvis Pusher," along with praise from NPR, Rolling Stone, The Wall Street Journal and Billboard for what The New York Times raves, "Like Otis Redding, Vintage Trouble makes music that is a little bit of everything ... You can slow dance, groove, rock and let it all go."

Following unforgettable TV performances on The Late Show with David Letterman, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Conan and Jimmy Kimmel Live, Vintage Trouble recently wowed audiences at this year's SXSW festival, capturing the attention of Yahoo Music who raves, "Imagine James Brown singing lead for Led Zeppelin, and you'll get an idea of Vintage Trouble's muscular, in-the-pocket sound."

Vintage Trouble is currently on a world tour that has already seen them open for Lenny Kravitz, The Cranberries, Joss Stone and recently, The Who. Their world tour continues in 2013 with performances at Coachella, Glastonbury and Rock In Rio, a Japanese headlining run and The Who's European Tour. The band will open for The Rolling Stones at Hyde Park in London this July, and will return to the US for a headlining tour in August.

Vintage Trouble's Ty Taylor, Nalle Colt, Richard Danielson and Rick Barrio Dill together form a quartet of sincere musicians whose combination of hard work, talent, and luck are undoubtedly going to take them right where they deserve to be: on our radios, in our cars, our headphones, our televisions, at the venues where we go to see our favorite bands and on the soundtrack of our favorite moments in life.

By Nick Faigen

$20.00 - $35.00

Tickets Available at the Door


Show :: 7:30pm (times subject to change)

Advance $20 | Day of Show $22 | Door $24 | Mezzanine (21+) $35

There is a $2 fee that applies to each ticket purchased at the Cain's Box Office.

No re-entry! No smoking! No refunds!

Oklahoma Joe’s will be serving their full menu from 6:30pm – 9pm.

add to your calendar

Who’s Going

Upcoming Events
Cain's Ballroom

Ticketfly

Gov't Mule with Vintage Trouble

Thursday, November 7 · Doors 6:30 PM at Cain's Ballroom

Tickets Available at the Door