Bob Schneider

“Paraphrasing Waylon, it don’t matter who’s in Austin, Bob Schneider is still the king…”
– Texas Monthly

When Spotify released its ranking of the top songs streamed in Austin in 2015, no one was surprised to find Bob Schneider holding the top three spots. For decades, no matter how the Austin music scene has evolved, or how the music industry has transformed, Bob Schneider has thrived. Known for his fiercely independent attitude and endless drive to innovate and create, Bob has built an unprecedented career in Austin.

Bob Schneider just might be the best artist you’ve never heard of. But this year alone, he’ll play over 80 shows in Austin and he’s headlining every premiere venue in town—the Paramount, the Bass Concert Hall, Dell Hall at the Long Center, and ACL Live/Moody Theater. Sure, he’s struggled to break out of the Texas bubble, but this doesn’t stop him. “If I were to listen to the gatekeepers—the critics, the charts—I’d never have done anything.” And though the media barely grants him sidelong glances, the audiences keep coming.

Bob packs houses, he croons, he makes everybody swoon.

In the heavy Texas summer heat, Bob Schneider stands in his garage, splattered in paint. Thick leaves pulled from fine art books soak in water baths as he prepares layers for a new collage. Intestines swirl on faces, haunted eyes peer out, and paintbrushes coat layers upon layers of glue as images transform one atop the other until Bob steps back, done.

The collage will find itself as the cover of Bob’s latest album, a curated collection of three thematically-linked five song EPs, collectively titled King Kong. The album hearkens back to his earliest releases, Lonelyland (2001), I’m Good Now (2004), albums that brought the essence of Bob—good songs, all genres, fun and harrowing, sharp and insightful. Songs to dance to, to laugh with, to mourn through.

Fans who buy the physical album are treated to an artistic masterpiece, a collector’s dream, with prints of Bob’s art wrapping the music.

Bob Schneider is tenacious, constantly churning out new work. He’s thinking ahead, two albums down the line. “When I’m recording a record, when I’m mixing a record, I’m still writing songs. I’m always writing songs.” He’s known for his prolific catalogue, more songs than most other bands on the charts have…combined. He brims with projects and ideas: a demo bible—a collection of 1000 original demos with lyrics—is long in the works, a way for his longterm fans to access all of his songs and all of their lyrics, from the deeply poetic to the tangled and twisted to the flat-out profane. He’s also hard at work developing The Across The World Symphony.

Bob doesn’t sleep. At least, it seems like he doesn’t sleep. He’s working on an arrangement at four a.m. He stays up all night filming and editing videos to accompany the songs on King Kong, releasing new videos weekly.

Offered a new project—a cameo appearance in a film, the chance to judge the Literary Death
Match, and Bob’s all in: “That sounds terrifying. I’ll totally do it.” He thrives on the challenge, happier to tackle projects that teeter on the edge of failure than return to the mundane sure successes.
Tell Bob that he can’t do a project, and he’ll just stop talking to you about it. “I have a complete inability to take no for an answer,” he laughs. If he’s got his mind set on it, he’s going to make it happen. Ideas, projects, art pours out of him.

One spring afternoon, he arrives at a friend’s yard to haul off a six-foot-tall tree trunk that blew down in a storm. Coming straight from a photo shoot, he’s dressed to the nines, but quickly gets covered in mulch and bark as he lugs the giant logs around, investigating which one he wants to bring home.
He’ll work it on his back patio, sanding and sawing and sanding until he’s got another in a series of haunting wooden sculptures, phallic, monk-like, a wooden choir of silent song and prayer. Trees fall, Bob crafts, sawdust in his hair.

Then he crashes into bed, catches just enough downtime to revive him, and wakes again, moving at top speed. He showers, drinks a pot of coffee, and races off to a gig. He arrives onstage, fully present and ready to play.

Audiences around the world can now peek into the sacred heart of the Austin live music scene, as Bob has begun livestreaming his Monday night residency at the Saxon Pub. Here each week for over fifteen years, he’s gathered up his band Lonelyland, and taken over this Austin institution. Bob presents his newest songs, plays with fresh arrangements, and charms the pants off of everyone in the room.

Bob Schneider is always pushing himself. And he’s pushing his audience. His songs are alive, fierce, hilarious, raw, crass. And then soulful, haunting, sweet, good.

He’ll leave you breathless. He must leave you breathless. He pushes himself to breathlessness, howling into the mic, playing his fingers raw, the room awash in thick waves of sound.

Then he’s jaunty, silly, laughing at his own jokes and tossing around a flyaway tune. Listen closely, and the lyrics speak of loss, betrayal, sorrow. But he’ll sing it to you with a smile and a twinkle in his eye.

Cory Morrow

Redemption through music is something Cory Morrow knows well after surviving nearly two decades in the rough and tumble music business. Battles with personal and professional demons inform Morrow's music in a manner that many performers don't have the experience to draw from. His wide ranging life experiences allow him to be a consummate singer/songwriter. He has the ability to write a tale about heartbreak as effortlessly as he can pen one about a carefree goodtime. That truth and authenticity is balanced by his infectious optimism and excitable personality.

A native of Houston, Morrow began playing guitar at a young age, but did not get serious about his music until attending college in Lubbock. Here, he was inspired by Texas songwriting greats like Robert Earl Keen and Townes Van Zandt. Spurred by this musical inspiration and a youthful vigor, Morrow moved to Austin in the early 90's to build his own career. Amidst a sea of night clubs featuring line dancing and Nashville hat acts dominating radio playlists, Morrow set about creating personal music that harkened back to the heyday of Willie Nelson's progressive country movement in the 70's.

Through several years of breakneck touring that featured Morrow's special brand of emotional and energetic live performances, he began to develop a large grassroots following. Coupled with the release of several successful independent albums and Morrow was really beginning to make a name for himself around Texas. By 1999, the music he was making with peers like Pat Green and Owen Temple was becoming a booming cottage industry and gaining nationwide notice. An acclaimed double album and a duets record with Green cemented Morrow's place in Lone Star lore.

Yet, he was not satisfied. The intensity that was found in his hallowed live performances was spilling over into his personal life. The depths he reached while reclaiming his life made him a more well-rounded artist. Over the next several years, Morrow grew his sound by working and writing with dizzying array of successful songwriters and producers.

Now, an elder statesman of the Texas scene he helped create, his latest album Brand New Me showcases an artist in complete control and making some of the best music of his storied career. Music started Morrow's journey and music has reinvigorated him. Behind these new songs and surrounded by a band of touring musicians among the best to be found anywhere, Morrow shows no signs of giving up his throne as one of the best Texas has to offer.


Shinyribs is the continuation of Kevin Russell’s musical journey which began in Beaumont,TX when, at 14, he found his father’s guitar under his bed, along with a sewing machine, a billy club and a box of comic books. Luckily he chose the guitar. Following his family’s oil boom and bust migratory path he landed in Shreveport,LA where he formed his first band. Picket Line Coyotes were a Husker Du meets Elvis Costello hybrid that lived and died between the “Arklatexabamassippi” borders much like their unfortunate animal namesake. That’s what took him to Austin where The Gourds were born from those Coyote ashes. That storied band of pumpkins came to an end after 18 years of good times and hard travelin’. And from that point on Russell has been riding high on the Shinyribs river of country-soul, swamp-funk and tickle. A Shinyribs show is an exaltation of spirit. It’s a hip shaking, belly laughing, soul-singing, song-slinging, down-home house party. All styles of American music are likely to be touched on, squeezed on, kissed on by this world class band featuring Winfield Cheek on Keyboards, Keith Langford on Drums, Jeff Brown on Bass and the Tijuana Train Wreck Horns. Whether on his 6 string Uke or his Electric guitar or singing acapella Russell will entertain you like no one else. The freedom with which he moves coupled with his incredible voice is an experience in and of itself. His original songs laced with magical-realism along with novel interpretations of popular songs old and new (George Jones, TLC, Leadbelly, T-Pain) are the true art that runs throughout. He’s Burl Ives meets Al Green, Hank, Jr. meets Teddy Pendergrass. Wendell Berry meets Chuck Berry. Truly something not to be missed. A unique musical experience and an original expression of our colorful musical heritage.

$15.00 - $20.00

Tickets Available at the Door

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