The David Mayfield Parade

The David Mayfield Parade

If you've seen David Mayfield perform with The Avett Brothers, Mumford & Sons, Jessica Lea Mayfield, or at Bonnaroo, you've caught the charisma, the heart, and the comedy, and it's likely you'll come back for more. The David Mayfield Parade's April 1 release "Good Man Down" begs for that same repeated
enjoyment.
With eclectic, cinematic songs that stir up images of the old West and urban cityscapes, the 12-track album feels like a game changer for a singer-songwriter, band leader, and Grammy nominated producer who stepped out of the sideman shadows with his 2011 solo debut "The Parade." He likens "Good Man
Down" to "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom." Like "Raiders of the Lost Ark," his first album was lighthearted and fun with nods to the past. His second is darker, creepier, more bizarre and outrageous.
He made "The Parade" without knowing if anyone would hear it, but the stakes for a follow-up were raised when his Kickstarter campaign more than doubled his initial goal of $18,000.
With a successful crowd funding campaign raising expectations, Mayfield felt it was time to take chances musically and delve into more adventurous production while tapping into his bluegrass roots. While anchored in descriptive songwriting with beautiful instrumentation including strings and horns, "Good Man Down" throws its listeners numerous musical curveballs. As producer he didn't rein in his weirder musical tendencies. Just like his lively sometimes comical live shows, "Good Man Down" illustrates a lot of character without seeming contrived. "Good Man Down" features notable guests Seth Avett, Mayfield's bluegrass hero Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, and country star Dierks Bentley who duets with Mayfield on Marty Stuart's "Tempted." Bentley remembered Mayfield from seeing his family's bluegrass band play long before the former was a country star. That's the thing. Mayfield isn't easy to forget.
David Mayfield grew up playing bass and touring with his family's bluegrass band. As a teenager he established himself as a hot picker collecting national awards for his dexterity on guitar and mandolin. His knack for colorful performances was evident as a backing player in his sister Jessica Lea Mayfield's band including their appearance on "The Late Show with David Letterman." He oozed personality on stage - a trait that makes him a natural frontman. He brought his skills and personality when he joined
the bluegrass outfit Cadillac Sky, with whom he co-penned the album "Letters in the Deep," produced by
Dan Auerbach and taking the band into a new realm, playing sold out shows with British folk revivalists Mumford and Sons. Around then Mayfield began writing songs after hearing artists like Randy Newman and Simon & Garfunkel. Encouraged by his sister Jessica, Mumford & Sons, and other friends in music to record his original material, Mayfield released "The Parade" to much acclaim. Since that time, David Mayfield has toured almost non-stop including many appearances with The Avett Brothers both with his
own Parade and sitting in with the Brothers, until taking time from the road to record Good Man Down in response to pleas from his fans for another record.
Conscious of not just being a musician, but an entertainer -something his father instilled in him in the family band - he certainly makes an impression live. But it's the strength of his songwriting and musicianship, combined with that charm and personality that keep audiences coming back again and
again.

Field Report

Field Report is the creation of Chris Porterfield, who cut his musical teeth with DeYarmond Edison (the other members of which were Justin Vernon/Bon Iver and Megafaun). After their breakup in 2006, Bon Iver and Megafaun went on to success while Chris hung back in Wisconsin, thinking his career in music was over. It was really just beginning. For the first time in his life, he began writing his own songs, which he spent the following five years carefully divining, killing off, revising, and honing. In December 2011, the record was finally recorded at Vernon's studio (with engineer Beau Sorenson).

Porterfield explains, "We began to feel like it was time to make a record in the fall of 2011. Around that time, Bon Iver was touring, and came through Milwaukee. I was talking with Justin, and he said that he had heard through the grapevine that I finally had found the right people to play with. He invited us to use his space. We were particularly interested in recording at his studio (April Base) because of the large live room. We wanted to capture the sound of a band in a moment. We specifically brought Beau [Sorenson] in for this reason, and for his love of later Talk Talk."

The result is a haunting set of songs that's crafty, lyrical, and poignant. After sending a few unfinished tracks to select people, the response was immediate and impactful: producer Paul Kolderie (Radiohead, Warren Zevon, The Pixies, Uncle Tupelo) fell in love with them and offered to mix the record, which he did in February 2012. The songs were also met with acclaim from many SXSW presenters, resulting in invitations to play at several high-profile showcases.

This momentum continued into the spring, as Rolling Stone's feature on the band championed them as "poised to break out in 2012." The sentiment was echoed by several other prominent media outlets such as SPIN, Pitchfork, Stereogum, and more. The most common praise has touched upon Field Report's narrative lyrical content, citing Porterfield's poetic prowess. "The songs always start out with the words," says Porterfield, "If I don't have something to say, there isn't a point for this band to make music."

After one of the pre-released tracks from the album, "Taking Alcatraz," launched into the top 10 most downloaded blog tracks worldwide, Field Report accepted an opening spot on the national Counting Crows summer tour, once lead singer Adam Duritz heard the songs. "It is undeniable when you listen to Field Report," Duritz enthused to Rolling Stone, "This is just great music."

All this took place within two months of their first gig (between March and May, 2012). This summer, Field Report plans to tour relentlessly and allow fans to have the entire album digitally free-of-charge. "We understand that today people are more motivated to get music for free than to pay for it. We want to remove the barriers and the gatekeepers," says Porterfield. "What's important to us is that people who want to hear our music are able to do so, in the way we created it to be heard."

Having a uniquely direct connection with fans is something Field Report has already emphasized. They have music freely downloadable on their site (www.field-report.org) as well as a phone number where fans can text a question directly to the band (414-215-9956).

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The David Mayfield Parade with Field Report, Bear Medicine

Wednesday, September 11 · Doors 9:00 PM / Show 10:00 PM at Cosmic Charlie's