SUNDAY - Sold Out

AFI
CRASH LOVE

Davey Havok - Vocals
Jade Puget - Guitar
Hunter Burgan - Bass
Adam Carson - Drums

"Crash Love is certainly not a concept album or rock opera by any stretch, but the songs are generally connected by a greater theme... The album title itself can be construed as a command, as a destructive kind of love, or as a desire for a relationship that's heading inevitably toward disaster or flameout. The lyrics of some songs trace an arc from adoration to the desire to tear down the object of affection. These songs are written from perspectives both sympathetic and critical, as well from both the inside the relationship and outside."--Davey Havok

Crash Love, AFI's eighth full length studio album, due out September 29 on DGC/Interscope, is indeed informed not only by the ever-evolving chemistry between the musicians in the band but also by the members' personal lives and perhaps most of all by the always intense relationship between AFI and its fans. The latter has intensified considerably over the most recent of AFI's 18 years as a band, with 2006's decemberunderground entering the chart at #1 with first week sales of nearly 200,000 and subsequent sold out shows at the Long Beach Arena and Bill Graham Civic as well as appearances on Saturday Night Live and at Live Earth--not to mention 2003's Sing The Sorrow going platinum. These experiences were bound to have an impact on four kids from Ukiah, California who formed a rudimentary punk band in 1991 with aspirations of playing in the SF Bay Area and possibly releasing a few singles and an LP or two.

"The record is really more about how the great attraction to inappropriately shared intimacies, carefully constructed personas, and the loss of a sense of self can affect an entire world," Havok explains. "As well as how this loss of self is sought after rather than resisted... With today's media, we have such quick and pervasive access to the trivia of anyone's lives. Everything is intensified and indulged, this desire and ability to know everything you possibly can about anyone, from what thread-count bedsheets they sleep in to whether or not they believe in ghosts."

While Crash Love is the first AFI record to feature such prevalent sociopolitical and observational perspectives, the darkly personal AFI lyrical strain is distinctly present on standout tracks like "Medicate" and its stark portrait of a user/enabler relationship, as well as throughout the ill fated death ride scenario of "End Transmission." Elsewhere, the newer approach shines on the self-explanatory "Darling I Want To Destroy You," "Veronica Sawyer Smokes" with couples Jade Puget's Smiths-esque guitar signatures with a tale of heartbreak brought on by disappointment with a teen idol, "Beautiful Thieves" with its privileged characters whose actions carry no consequences, and "Too Shy To Scream" which sets yearning, distanced adorations against the backdrop of a drumline-inspired shuffle propelled by Hunter Burgan's bass and Adam Carson's drumming.

Crash Love, it has to be said, features AFI's Puget, Burgan and Carson playing at their most focused and direct. Where Sing The Sorrow and decemberunderground saw the band's compositions increasingly steeped in atmospherics that created a moody-heavy realm that often threatened to engulf the songs, Crash Love is, according to Carson, "the sound of the four of us playing in the same room. It's by no means stripped down but you really hear the band. Sing The Sorrow--and to certain extent decemberunderground--gave us our first experience with big budget recording, which led to some really dense arrangements, electronics, overdubs and so on. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but this time we came in with 14 songs we were playing really well and wanted to capture that energy."

Having entered the studio with fully formed and woodshedded songs, Puget and Burgan were freed to come up with novel approaches to each of their instruments--reducing their dependence on strings, keys and other embellishments both organic and electronic. Following a writing process that Puget recalls taking "the better part of a year," the band convened in late 2008 with producers Joe McGrath and Jacknife Lee to begin work in earnest on what would become Crash Love. "We don't jam," Puget explains. "But we had the material so completely formed by the time we began recording that we were able to do things more on the fly this time, to concentrate on sounds as well as performance, to contribute anything that worked, that made a sound that was interesting. So we ended up with sort of a 'Shabby Chic' recording aesthetic: The sounds we came up with separately could be really rough and abrasive but assembled together they created an end result that was really beautiful."

Carson adds, "Personally I'm more interested in the way AC/DC sounds big: Tones that are really big but don't necessarily need a stadium, that sound just as big in an 800 capacity club."

Carson speaks from experience. Having co-founded AFI with Havok in 1991, he's seen his share of clubs that size and considerably smaller.
Within a year of forming, the original AFI lineup pressed up about 200 copies of the split 7-inch Dork with fellow Ukiah High students Loose Change (of which future AFI guitarist Puget was a member). A smattering of singles, EPs and compilation tracks followed, as did the early AFI albums Answer That And Stay Fashionable (Wingnut, 1995) and Very Proud of Ya (Nitro, 1996), all showcasing a youthfully exuberant, often sophomoric East Bay hardcore punk style that began to cultivate a following as the band hit the road, playing virtually anywhere in the world that would have them.

The first hints of AFI's more diverse and mature current direction would appear on the band's third album and first to feature Burgan on bass, Shut Your Mouth And Open Your Eyes (Nitro, 1997) and the subsequent A Fire Inside EP (Adeline, 1998). It would be one more year, however, until the present AFI lineup and sound would truly coalesce with the addition of guitarist Puget and the release of fourth album Black Sails In The Sunset and the All Hallows EP (both Nitro, 1999). Another year later, fifth album The Art of Drowning (Nitro, 2000) would provide a breakthrough, as the fully realized and unmistakable AFI sound already having built a following in the hundreds of thousands, would receive its first taste of mainstream exposure as that record's "Days Of The Phoenix" found its way onto modern rock playlists.

With sixth album Sing The Sorrow (Dreamworks, 2003), AFI made an exceedingly ambitious leap forward, enlisting co-producers the late Jerry Finn and Butch Vig and expanding their musical palette in all directions: First single "Girl's Not Grey" represented the band's most infectious "pop" moment up to that point and became a bona fide hit, while live favorite "Death Of Seasons" incorporated pounding industrial rhythms and mournful choruses before dissolving into a cacophony of screaming anguish. Elsewhere on the record, "Silver And Cold" provided bittersweet balladic verses that exploded into an irresistible chorus, while "Leaving Song Part 2" and "Dancing Through Sunday" showed the familiar AFI chant-along choruses to be as fierce and frantic as ever, even while couched in increasingly sophisticated musicianship.

As with AFI's previous surges forward, their dedicated legions of fans made the leap with them as new ones joined in droves: Sing The Sorrow sold in excess of one million copies in the U.S. and "Girl's Not Grey" won the 2003 MTV2 Viewers Choice award. Critics joined in for the first time as well, with best of 2003 accolades awarded by the likes of the NEW YORK TIMES, USA TODAY, GUITAR WORLD, SPIN and REVOLVER, as well as from longtime supporters ALTERNATIVE PRESS.

"I was completely in awe then and still am now," Burgan recalls. "It all seemed to have come naturally from our efforts and honestly that's really hard for me to comprehend."

The band was stunned yet again when the sixth AFI album, decemberunderground (Interscope, 2006), released on 6-6-06, stormed into the U.S. album chart at #1, selling 182,000 in its first week and unseating the Dixie Chicks from their multiple week perch atop the charts. Also produced by the late, lamented Finn, decemberunderground yielded the band's biggest anthem to date, "Miss Murder," which went on to be named #7 in ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY's 10 best songs of 2006 and #15 in ROLLING STONE's 100 best songs of the year. Other decemberunderground tracks that instantly assumed fan classic status alongside longtime AFI fan favorites included the frigidly beautiful "Love Like Winter," the hyper aggressive "Kill Caustic," and the infectiously melodic "Summer Shudder" and "The Missing Frame." decemberunderground went on to sell over a million copies, providing AFI with its second consecutive platinum album, as the band sold out venues on the level of California's Long Beach Arena and San Francisco's Bill Graham Civic Center, made its debut appearance on SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE, and played the New Jersey installation of 2007's Live Earth festival.

The members of AFI readily acknowledge the debt their success story owes to their fiercely local following, The Despair Faction. AFI and The Despair Faction have long enjoyed an intimate relationship that goes beyond more conventional fan club perks such as exclusive merchandise and ticket pre-sales to soundcheck parties regularly organized and attended by DF members who come bearing gifts ranging from homemade AFI artwork, clothing and other keepsakes to vegan baked goods for Havok and Burgan. "They're not really a fan club per se," says Puget. "The Despair Faction was conceived to be more interactive than that, to have more of a direct connection with us."

This connection was inverted and intensified with the Begin Transmission experiment that took place during the recording of Crash Love. AFI solicited videos from the band's fans, each giving a glimpse into the life of the video's maker, with the understanding that a handful of entrants would be chosen to contribute backing vocals to the new record. Havok, Carson, Burgan and Puget personally went through over a thousand entries, ultimately choosing six winners who were then notified in person by longtime AFI tour manager Smith Puget and flown to Los Angeles to guest on Crash Love (where they can be heard prominently on the "Flash Flash Car Crash" refrains of "I'm Trying Very Hard To Be Here," for example). Honorable mention runners-up each received handmade Valentine's Day cards from members of AFI.

"We turned the dynamic around," says Burgan, who was voted Top Music Twitterer in this year's Shorty Awards. "We looked into the lives of the fans. Real people doing real things. It was very interesting to see who's out there, what they're feeling and what they're doing with their lives. They already know who we are, so it was good to get to know them for a change."

Carson adds, "The idea was to engage the fans and make them a part of the process. I didn't expect to be so floored by the effort that went into these kids' videos of their lives. It was a great state of the union, so to speak. And we came away from it feeling that much more of a bond with them."

If the quality of Crash Love is any indication, that bond will only continue to intensify. "I am so proud of this record," Havok concludes. "I really believe it's the best AFI record. It honestly feels like we've made our first truly timeless record. We didn't set out to do that--you can't set out to do something like that--but it definitely feels like that's what we've achieved: created the album by which we'll be remembered."

Brand New

If you are reading this then i must apologize. I have been trying to think what the "correct" words to write here would be, or rather who the "correct" person to write it could be. I have drawn some immediate blanks though i am working on it. For now though, i will be brief.

Brand New was started in a very obligatory basement in Merrick, New York, a suburb of Manhattan by singer/guitarist Jesse Lacey, drummer Brian Lane, guitarist Vin Accardi, and bassist Garrett Tierney. The four individuals all had musical roots sunk in the Long Island Independent/Hardcore music scene, but with tastes that ranged from Buddy Rich to the Archers of Loaf to .... blah blah blah... the band always felt like it could move outside of whatever notions they felt inclined to when they were making music as younger people. After recording their first record, Your Favorite Weapon, with a friend and fifth band member, Mike Sapone, they began to tour the nation relentlessly. A second record, Deja Entendu, followed and so did the touring. U.S., U.K., Canada, Australia, Japan.... almost Japan. We're not sure exaclty how many records we've sold, or exactly how many people like us. But it's going pretty well right now. So we're going with it.

All Time Low

The members of All Time Low have always been very open about their formative musical influences:
New Found Glory, Fall Out Boy, Green Day, Third Eye Blind and, of course, Blink-182. They've also been
open about how their icons have inspired their previous albums—from the Saves The Day-esque pop-
punk jams populating 2007's So Wrong, It's Right to the upbeat rockers on 2009's Nothing Personal and
the eclectic, ecstatic pop of 2011's Dirty Work. But when it came time to make their fifth album, Don't
Panic, the band decided to look inward for inspiration.

"With this record, a big part of the process was finding what made our band special on each of our
past records," says singer/guitarist Alex Gaskarth. "This time around, rather than taking influence from
anything we were listening to at the time—or anything we want to touch on generationally—the goal
was to make an album that we felt reflected the best aspects of our previous releases."

Indeed, Don't Panic—which marks All Time Low's return to Hopeless Records after a stint on a major
label—brims with the type of energetic, hook-filled songs the band's fans have always gravitated
toward. Mixed by Neal Avron, the album encompasses anthemic pop-rock ("The Irony Of Choking On
A Lifesaver"), ferocious punk-pop ("So Long Soldier," a song with guest vocals from Bayside's Anthony
Raneri) '90s-influenced alt-rock ("To Live And Let Go") and gritty emo-pop ("Somewhere In Neverland").
Don't Panic is a record meant to be played at top volume in the car, with the windows all the way down.

In that sense, Don't Panic recalls the fast-and-loose vibe of the band's breakthrough album, So Wrong,
It's Right—a record the band members made when they were just barely out of high school. But All
Time Low have grown up considerably since that release. Their last two albums debuted in the Billboard
Top 10, while videos for the songs "Weightless" and "I Feel Like Dancin'" received love from MTV.
Additionally, All Time Low grew into a fierce live act: Besides tours with Fall Out Boy, Yellowcard, Third
Eye Blind, Simple Plan and Good Charlotte—as well as multiple stints on Warped Tour's main stage and
appearances at major festivals such as Reading, Leeds and Summer Sonic—they've even had the chance
to play shows alongside idols Blink-182, Green Day and Foo Fighters.

For the band—which formed in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland, nearly a decade ago—making
Don't Panic was a much different experience than creating Dirty Work. First and foremost, the songs
came together quicker: Gaskarth first brought musical ideas to his bandmates in fall 2011, and then put
the finishing touches on them this past spring with Mike Green, who also produced multiple songs on
Dirty Work. Right away, the rest of All Time Low—lead guitarist Jack Barakat, bassist Zack Merrick and
drummer Rian Dawson—could tell there was something special about this new music.

"I've never really heard a song that Alex has written or we've written and not been completely stoked
on it," says Dawson. "But for some reason, these just felt more us. There was less need to force
anything, less need to prove anything, less need to chase anything. It was All Time Low writing All Time
Low songs."

Driven by these positive vibes, All Time Low chose to record the entire album with producer Green at
his Los Angeles studio. The consistency was a relief—and a change from the recent past, when the band

constructed albums with multiple collaborators in different studios. "It was a lot more relaxed," Barakat
says about the Don't Panic recording process. "We didn't have a timeline; there was no pressure from a
time standpoint. You would just go in and write a bunch of songs—and when we felt like we had enough
great songs, then we'd record the album. It was doing everything on our own terms."

Still, it's not like these sessions were easy. Green urged each member of All Time Low to push
themselves and stretch their abilities; for instance, Dawson needed to practice for "three to four hours
a day" to get some of his parts right, while the always-driven Merrick says the producer encouraged
him to "try anything" in order to see what worked. All Time Low welcomed being challenged, though—
especially because it came from someone who truly understands the band. "He's not trying to force us
to be something we don't want to be—and he's not cluttering up our vision," Gaskarth says. "He allows
us to be ourselves, but takes us in positive directions rather than taking us down paths we might not
want to go down."

This hard work resulted in the most complex All Time Low record, one with compelling sonic twists
and turns. Take the fist-pumping lead single "For Baltimore," an intricate combination of several
distinct styles—spinning-top electric riffs, hard-charging chorus breakdowns and a tasteful, acoustic-
driven bridge—which succeeds despite being wildly diverse. Or "Backseat Serenade," which boasts
hollering guest vocals from Cassadee Pope and a swooning string section on the bridge. And then there's
the marching, melodic "Outlines," a tune co-written by Patrick Stump which boasts bright, stacked
harmonies from former Acceptance vocalist Jason Vena.

But while All Time Low enjoyed recording Don't Panic, the lyrics they came up with weren't exactly
universally upbeat. As Dawson bluntly puts it, "being let down, basically, was the general concept" of
the record. While romantic dissatisfaction comprises some of this disappointment—getting into ill-fated
relationships against your better judgment or missing a long-distance love—other songs address much
darker topics. On "So Long, And Thanks For All The Booze," Gaskarth sings about needing to reclaim
identity—"You gotta let me be me," he begs repeatedly—while "The Irony Of Choking On A Lifesaver,"
describes being unpleasantly taken by surprise by something he thought was an ally: "But you're always
out to get me / You're the snake hidden in my daffodils when I'm picking flowers." Even "Outlines,"
which Gaskarth asserts is "a song about legacy and leaving your mark on the world" is bittersweet: "I'm
just a moment, so don't let me pass you by."

Much of this residual frustration is left over from the aftermath of Dirty Work's release, a time which
found All Time Low and their then-label parting ways. "There was a lot to say about what we had been
through, how it affected us and where we want to go now," Gaskarth admits. But in true All Time Low
fashion, they found the silver lining in this disappointment: "Thanks To You" is about breaking free from
negative energy, people and habits, while the chugging "The Reckless And The Brave" celebrates the
band's status as defiant misfits.

"A big part of the way this band has always written is to find the good in things," Gaskarth says. "I don't
think we've ever been one of those bands that dwells on the dark times. It's really more about pushing
through it. That's always been something unique about this band. It doesn't dwell on hardship—it takes

hardship and offers a solution."

Even the title Don't Panic, which stems from Douglas Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy, is a
reference to this forward-thinking attitude. The sci-fi book's theme—staying zen in the face of chaos—
resonated deeply with Gaskarth, especially where it related to All Time Low. "We went through some
rough times for the first time in our band's career, being a part of a label that didn't quite understand
us," he says. "Through it all, we stayed positive. That's the general outlook on the whole record—move
forward, keep looking forward and keep grinding."

Now and as always, what keeps All Time Low moving forward are their dedicated fans, the ones who
have championed the group through thick and thin. All four members of the band know how lucky they
are to have such loyal listeners—and don't take their support for granted. "We're not going anywhere,"
Barakat says. "We're going to keep releasing music our fans love and we're going to keep touring. We've
always been the same four dudes who've been releasing music non-stop. This is our music. We're here
to stay."

Pierce The Veil

A lot has happened in the three years since Pierce The Veil released their debut A Flair For The Dramatic in 2007. The band have toured the world including Warped Tour in 2008 and Taste Of Chaos in 2009; converted countless fans to their unique brand of progressive post-hardcore; and, most notably, grown as both people and musicians from these cumulative experiences. All of this figures into the group's long-awaited sophomore release Selfish Machines, an album that sees the band-frontman Vic Fuentes, drummer Mike Fuentes, guitarist Tony Perry and bassist Jaime Preciado-coming together to craft an inventive album that is certain to challenge people's perception of the band.

Recorded with Mike Green (Paramore, Set Your Goals) in Los Angeles, the album ended up being more involved than initially planned-but that ended up being a blessing in disguise. "It was actually a pretty intense process," Vic explains, adding that the band didn't finish the album in the time allotted which forced him to stay in LA for an extra two months working on vocals and bouncing between recording studios working on new ideas. "It was definitely necessary to take the extra time with this recording," he continues. "We're not settling on anything with this record."

From the soaring pop sensibility of songs like "Bulletproof Love" to the upbeat aggression of "Caraphernelia", the album shows how versatile Pierce The Veil have become, whether they're screaming their hearts out or gently bearing their souls. There are also plenty of sonic surprises on Selfish Machines, most notably the emotive, piano-driven ballad "Stay Away From My Friends" which displays the band's growth as songwriters. "That song was my first crack at writing on piano," Vic explains. "I've got a piano in my house now so I'd been messing around on it and ended up writing some riffs, which I think definitely gave the album a different feel," he continues, adding that he hopes to eventually implement keyboards into the band's live performances.

Although Pierce The Veil have toured incessantly for the past three years, they made some time late last year to write these tracks and instantly threw themselves into the songwriting process. "It's pretty hard for us to write on the road because we're touring in an RV most of the time with tight quarters, which doesn't bode well for creativity," Vic acknowledges with a laugh. "We have a studio at home that I like to hang out in, so I basically just shut myself out from the world for three or four months and spent all day and night writing," he continues. "Every song is super personal; they're all very real about our lives and I think once people read them they can probably see a little bit about what's going on with us."

"We are all in one way or another selfish machines," Vic explains when asked about the album's title. "In no way is this a negative thing, it's human nature. We all have natural tendencies to want, love, and take. When it comes down to it, humans have animal like qualities that we keep inside and even try to deny-but no matter how morally good someone may think they are or try to be, we are still humans," he continues. "One example of this is how we are all constantly searching for someone to love, or even more desperately, someone to love you. It is human nature broken down to its bare bones, no bullshit, just rock bottom honest feelings and desire. No trying to be nice, shy, or respectable, it's about the 'evil' thing inside of us that is really not evil at all, it's just there and always will be inside of us all."

Having played with bands in nearly every subgenre, Pierce The Veil have always prided themselves on not confining their band to one particular scene or genre-and the harmony-rich songs like "I Don't Care If You're Contagious" are guaranteed to expose them to entirely new crowds of followers with Selfish Machines. "Every band that I've ever loved and admired has constantly grown and each record is a little different in their own way and I think that's how it should be because it keeps you setting new goals and trying to change for the better," Vic explains. "This record is definitely going to take us new places and after this we'll keep writing and try to make the next one even better," he summarizes. "We're always looking ahead."

Rocket from the Crypt

Pledging to never play a venue with a stage, singer/guitarist John Reis formed San Diego's Rocket From the Crypt in the summer of 1990 after becoming disillusioned with the hardcore punk band he was in called Pitchfork. Joining with then-current Rocketeers bassist Petey X and guitarist ND, in addition to departed drummer Sean and backing vocalist Elaina, Reis and company released Paint As a Fragrance in 1991.

Though the album caused a lot of people to take notice, a lineup change ensued; Atom became the drummer, and Apollo 9, a drinking buddy of Reis' who played sax in high school, joined as saxophonist. After the successful independent Circa: Now! was released on Cargo Records in 1992, a major-label bidding war resulted in Rocket From The Crypt signing with Interscope Records (in addition to Reis' other band, Drive Like Jehu, which features another former Pitchfork member, Rick Fork). Interscope then re-released Circa: Now! in 1993, and the single "Ditch Digger" spent some time in MTV's Buzz Bin. Eventually, a sixth member -- JC 2000 on horn -- was added in 1994, which preceded the release of a new 10" record, The State of Art Is on Fire, in 1995. By the end of the year, the group released its most-acclaimed album to date, Scream, Dracula, Scream. RFTC followed in 1998, and Group Sounds was issued on Vagrant in early 2001. Rocket From the Crypt was a rock & roll machine throughout the early 2000's. Their garage punk style was as fresh as those following the punk revival trend. In 2002, Rocket From the Crypt emerged with the raucous, rowdy sounds of Live From Camp X-Ray. ~ Matt Carlson, All Music Guide

The Dismemberment Plan

In 2003, if you told the members of The Dismemberment Plan that ten years later they would not only be releasing a new album, but their best record to date, there's no way they would have believed you. Since forming in Washington, D.C. in 1993, the band has released four highly acclaimed full-lengths, toured the world many times over, and become one of the most well respected—and indefinable—acts in indie rock. But the past decade has seen their members exploring other areas both inside and outside of music, and even embracing adulthood. However, along the way something funny happened: They reunited three years ago to play some shows to support the reissue of 1999's Emergency & I, and realized their most potent magic had yet to be bottled.
"We never psyched ourselves out and thought, 'NOW we're making a Plan record," explains guitarist Jason Caddell. "It was more like stay calm and play on," he continues with a laugh. These sessions between the band—which also includes guitarist/vocalist Travis Morrison, bassist Eric Axelson and drummer Joe Easley—resulted in a collection of songs that are inspired because they weren't burdened by any expectations, allowing them to retain the fire of their nascent recordings while entering a fresh sonic aura. "We weren't going to get anything good unless we could trick ourselves into staying in that place where it was creativity for its own sake," Morrison elaborates. "It was a real blessing and opportunity to be in that space again without thinking we had a product to deliver."

To be fair, The Dismemberment Plan never thought of their music as a commodity, despite the fact that they have been handpicked to tour with Pearl Jam and shared the stage with peers Death Cab For Cutie on the co-headlining Death And Dismemberment Tour, among other career milestones. "Our goals have always been more abstract than sales and statistics," Caddell explains. That statement is confirmed by the fact that in the years since their hiatus the members have gone on to thrive in their respective creative and intellectual fields while still keeping music an active presence in their lives.

Case in point, Axelson has been teaching in public schools and playing in various bands, including Maritime; Morrison worked for The Huffington Post and The Washington Post, and now is the president of his own start-up in addition to singing in church choirs; Caddell has been a freelance audio engineer for corporate and political events ranging from presidential elections to the G8 Summit at Camp David, all the while playing on and producing records for his friends and bandmates; and Easley received a degree in Aerospace Engineering, and now works at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on a robotic satellite servicing program in addition to playing with Axelson in Statehood.

Uncanney Valley was recorded by longtime collaborator J. Robbins (Jawbreaker, The Promise Ring) at his Baltimore Studio, Magpie Cage, and mixed by Paul Q. Kolderie (Pixies, Radiohead), and the result is an album that maintains The Dismemberment Plan's unique sound while simultaneously allowing them to open up and expand on the foundation of their celebrated back catalog. Produced by Jason Caddell and The Dismemberment Plan, this is the first time in the band's history that they didn't use an outside producer. "When I listen to this record it's hard for me to believe we're a bunch of 40 year olds now," Morrison admits. "It sounds like the musical heat is stronger than ever."

This love of music is as evident in the buoyant groove of the Jackson Browne- inspired "Daddy Was A Real Good Dancer" as it is on the sweetly syncopated, electronically augmented rocker "Mexico City Christmas." "Generally we have deeply broad taste in a lot of different types of music, and it's not a fashion statement. It's a genuine heartfelt appreciation, and I think you can hear that in our music," Caddell responds when asked about the colorful sonic palette illustrated on the album. Whether Morrison is flexing his R&B chops on the quirky, catchy "Waiting" or approaching the concept of a love song in a new and effective context on the quasi-ballad "Lookin," Uncanney Valley has moments certain to captivate both new listeners and longtime fans of the band.

The Dismemberment Plan's personal growth is mirrored in Morrison's lyrics, which center on his move to Brooklyn. "I wrote the kind of lyric stories I wanted to hear that I just wasn't getting from other artists," he explains. And even when he's exploring isolation on the synth-driven "Invisible," the songs retain a level of honesty that's impossible to fake.

This spirit of collaboration paired with the members' diverse taste and life experiences are what make Uncanney Valley such an enthralling listen—and although the group remains unsure what the future holds for them, the most important thing right now is that they exist here in the moment. "We're very much taking things one step at a time, but I will say that at this juncture the excitement level is high. So, whatever comes next comes next," Caddell summarizes.

Ultimately, whether the members are controlling robots on a space station or performing live with an enthusiasm that transcends age, The Dismemberment Plan are a special band, and Uncanney Valley solidifies that as times change and tides shift, this will always hold true.

Against Me!

The story of Against Me! began in Naples, FL back in 1997. Tom Gabel, who was playing in a local grind-core band at the time, started playing under the name as a solo project with no intentions of doing anything beyond making a demo tape, and overcoming stage fright by playing a show by himself. Shortly after these goals were realized, he started collaborating with his friend Kevin Mahon (now of the band forgetters), who accompanied him on a make-shift drum set built out of scavenged (dumpster) pickle buckets and whatever real drum parts they could round up. The two then recorded another 10 song demo tape entitled Vivida Vis on a four track tape recorder in Tom's bedroom at his mother's house. They self-released the album by dubbing copies on boom boxes and stealing photo copies for the covers and lyric booklet. Tom and Kevin moved to Gainesville in 1999 and released their first self-recorded, self-titled 5 song 12" EP on the Baltimore label Crasshole Records in 2000. This was followed by their first 7" EP, recorded by Rob Mcgregor at Goldentone studios, entitled Crime As Forgiven By… and released by Sabot Productions in 2001. Shortly after, they were joined by James Bowman on guitar, followed by Dustin Fridkin on bass. After the last show of their first full fledged tour as a 4-piece band, while driving south on I-75 from Bloomington, IN back to Gainesville, FL their van was struck by a semi truck. They rolled multiple times and landed upside down in a ditch, and while all of their equipment and van were destroyed, everyone walked away from the accident relatively unscathed. It was at this point Kevin Mahon left the band to pursue an interest in train hopping. After briefly considering quitting altogether, Tom and Dustin continued under the name as a 2-piece releasing another 7" EP on Sabot Productions, fan-titled The Acoustic EP. Unsatisfied with playing music as an acoustic duo, Tom and Dustin began playing music with Warren Oakes on drums and were rejoined by James Bowman on guitar.


Since 1997 Against Me! has played over 2,000 shows worldwide, not only having played in every state in the U.S., but traveling world-wide to Japan, New Zealand, Australia, Iceland, Ireland, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Belgium, Netherlands, Denmark, Hungary, Croatia, Poland, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Lithuania. They have toured with a wide range of bands including The Foo Fighters, Green Day, The Pogues, Jimmy Eat World, NOFX, Lucero, Ted Leo & The Pharmacists, Mastodon, Matt & Kim, Cursive, Rise Against, The Bouncing Souls, Hot Water Music, Billy Talent, Silversun Pickups, Alkaline Trio, The Blood Brothers, Social Distortion, Japanther, The Grabass Charlestons, and Sage Francis. In addition, they have made multiple appearances at festivals such as Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, The Warped Tour, Reading & Leeds, Pukkelpop and many more.

Those familiar with the decades-spanning oeuvre of Bob Mould—from his pioneering early '80s work with Hüsker Dü to his solo work in singer-songwriter, electronic, and rock modes, to the deafening pop sparkle of Sugar—might expect a new album bearing the title Silver Age to be a somber and reflective set in the mode of his last album, 2009's Life and Times…and they'd be way off the mark.

Silver Age is an intense and concise ten song blast far more reminiscent of Bob's latter-day Hüsker Dü output—first marked by the monumental sprawl of 1984's Zen Arcade which then gave way to the short, sharp pop focus of 1985's New Day Rising—and his early '90s tenure with Sugar, whose classic debut Copper Blue marks its 20th anniversary this year. That said, Silver Age is no nostalgia trip. Aside from lyrical content that shows Bob as in-the-now as ever, Silver Age came together quickly and organically in the wake of a series of electric solo dates in 2011 supporting Foo Fighters (where he guested each night on "Dear Rosemary," the track from the Foos' Wasting Light on which Bob shares writing and vocal duties) as well as a solo acoustic/book tour around last summer's publication of See a Little Light: The Trail of Rage and Melody, the autobiography Bob co-authored with Michael Azerrad (Come as You Are, Our Band Could Be Your Life). These events culminated in a tribute last November at Los Angeles' Disney Hall that featured the likes of Dave Grohl, Ryan Adams, Spoon's Britt Daniel, and Craig Finn and Tad Kubler of The Hold Steady celebrating the width and breadth of Bob's body of work.

"I'd been batting around the idea of another aggressive pop record for some time," Bob says, "especially as the 20th anniversary of Copper Blue kept getting closer. But it was really the shows with Foo Fighters that got me thinking when I started writing for this record: Did I just write a Sugar song? Or a Foo Fighters song? Or one of my own songs? And does it really matter? Once I got that out of the way, it freed me up to have some fun and set about making a simple rock record."

It's no surprise, then, that Silver Age careens out of the speakers with a sense of exhilaration that reflects the excitement with which Bob and his live band of bassist Jason Narducy (Split Single, Verbow) and drummer Jon Wurster (Superchunk, the Mountain Goats) cranked out the record in a tight whirlwind of a window from in early 2012. But that's not to say that Silver Age is a lighthearted romp—as ever, there's plenty of dark matter at the center of these sweet melodic nuggets. First single "The Descent," for example, is one of those perfect moments that lands firmly in the Mould wheelhouse, with walls of luminescent guitars, phantom choruses, and infectious hooks all leading toward the concluding refrain of "My world, it is descending." The opening one-two of "Star Machine" and "Silver Age," on the other hand, pairs abrasive riffs with equally harsh meditations on fame, immaturity, and the lessons and consequences thereof. Other Silver Age highlights include the bittersweet romantic epic "Round the City Square" ("It feels like people always look to my songs to help define their own failed relationships," Bob laughs); the upbeat and earnest celebration of "First Time Joy"; and the unabashedly literal "Keep Believing," a rousing love letter to the records that shaped Bob's personal and professional life. Listen closely and see how many of the references you can pinpoint:

Bring me thoughts and words, pass me the revolver

I can see for miles, and everything's in color

Rock and roll all night until I feel the thunder

I got a handle on some complicated fun

We're all sniffing glue, pleasures so unknown

A circle drawn in blue, the murmur baritone

Picnic on a Pedro lawn, heaven took that monkey song

Never mind the battle won, could you be the loveless one?

"I don't know if there's an arc to this record," Bob says. "But if I had to boil it down to one core idea, it would be: I love music. I love my life. I love what I do for a living. It's right there on the lyric sheet; it references itself, really. More than any other record I've made, this one gives a real glimpse into how much making music means to me as a means of expression, as well as what music means to me as a fan."

And so has it always been the case for Bob Mould, the music he's created defining every phase of his life, both cataloging memories and propelling him ever forward: Hüsker Dü's formation in 1979 and the hardcore anthems, tight, melodic, hard-pop chestnuts, and sprawling double-vinyl conceptual opuses it churned out in equal measure up to its dramatic 1987 flameout; Bob's solo works ranging from his landmark 1989 debut Workbook to Black Sheets of Rain (1990), Body of Song (2005), District Line (2008), and Life and Times (2009); his forays into electronic music, including 2002's Modulate and his Blowoff collaboration with Richard Morel; and of course, the soon-to-be-reissued body of work that Sugar packed into its brief existence, featuring the 1992 debut Copper Blue which Bob and his band have been playing front to back at recent live shows. It seems to be Bob's summations and reflections on these major creative periods of his life and career that open up new wellsprings while coming to terms with the old works—a natural process that has produced winning results yet again in the form of Silver Age.

"It's no coincidence that this record came at this point," Bob says. "In 1991, closing the door on a run of all-acoustic shows led right into the beginning of Sugar and Copper Blue. So you could state a case that the solo shows accompanying the book readings through 2011—plus the Disney Hall show and knowing the 20th anniversary of Copper Blue was right around the corner—wrapping that all up led me right into Silver Age. I'm well aware that there's no way to get into a time machine and go back to being the person I was 20 years ago, but it is nice to get three musicians in the studio together and get back inside that three-minute pop song structure again."

Suicidal Tendencies

Judging from their name, Suicidal Tendencies were never afraid of a little controversy. Formed in Venice, CA, during the early '80s, the group's leader from the beginning was outspoken vocalist Mike Muir. The outfit specialized in vicious hardcore early on -- building a huge following among skateboarders, lending a major hand in the creation of skatepunk -- before turning their focus eventually to thrash metal. Early on, the group (whose original lineup included Muir, guitarist Grant Estes, bassist Louiche Mayorga, and drummer Amery Smith) found it increasingly difficult to book shows, due to rumors of its members' affiliation with local gangs and consistent violence at their performances. The underground buzz regarding Suicidal Tendencies grew too loud for labels to ignore though, as the quartet signed on with the indie label Frontier; issuing Muir and company's classic self-titled debut in 1983. The album quickly became the best-selling hardcore album up to that point; its best-known track, "Institutionalized," was one of the first hardcore punk videos to receive substantial airplay on MTV, and was eventually used in the Emilio Estevez cult classic movie Repo Man, as well as in an episode for the hit TV show Miami Vice (for which the group made a cameo appearance).

Muir formed a new version of Suicidal Tendencies in the late '90s (with Clark being the only other familiar face), resulting in such further studio releases as 1999's Freedumb and 2000's Free Your Soul and Save My Mind. Muir and Trujillo joined forces once more for a fourth Infectious Grooves studio release in 2000, Mas Borracho; while another Cyco Miko release surfaced, Schizophrenic Born Again Problem Child, along with a follow-up up to their earlier compilation, Friends & Family, Vol. 2. Now the band will be back with their brand new album for 2009.......

The Only Place is Best Coast's follow-up to their 2010's acclaimed album Crazy For You, and it finds the proudly Southern Californian duo of Bethany Cosentino and Bobb Bruno maturing in both their sound and perspective. While Crazy For You was a nostalgic tribute to teenage feelings, The Only Place finds front woman Cosentino starting a transition into adulthood. "I'm trying really hard to grow up," she says. "I'm trying to let go of my bad habits and the immature things I still drag around with me."

Of course this adjusting comes with uncertainty and self-doubt, two feelings at the emotional center of the album. The Only Place also celebrates Los Angeles, the one place where Cosentino believes she can be the woman she wants to be. Taken all together, it evocatively captures a turbulent era in one person's life. "This record was therapeutic for me to write," Cosentino says. "But a lot of the issues I was facing will be relatable to anybody."

As with all of Best Coast's previous recordings, on The Only Place Cosentino handles all songwriting, lyrics, vocals and rhythm guitar, while multi-instrumentalist Bobb Bruno plays lead guitar, bass and drums. What's new this time is their decision to work with producer and composer Jon Brion. A revered figure in the music world, Brion has collaborated with artists including Fiona Apple and Kanye West and created the scores for such films as Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Punch-Drunk Love. Recorded at Capitol Records' famed Studio B, The Only Place features a cleaner and richer sound than other Best Coast releases. Many of the songs' arrangements are detailed with subtle percussion and unexpected instrumentation. Intricate but never overworked, the biggest change from previous releases is how it showcases Cosentino's voice, this time letting it ring clear, unhidden by distortion and reverb.

The Only Place is full of heartbreakers and kiss-offs. But the true heart of The Only Place, and everything that Best Coast does, is the collaboration between Cosentino and Bruno. For this album the pair continued to work with the system they developed during the band's unassuming beginnings: Cosentino creates a rough demo of each song on her own with vocals and a basic guitar part, then sends it to Bruno who fleshes out the instrumentation and structure. The only time they work on the song together is when they are in the studio. Bruno is a music veteran and has recorded, producer and engineered with a wide variety of artists. "Best Coast is the easiest thing I've ever done musically," he says. "We don't really argue. I told Beth from day one, 'If you ever don't like something I'm doing or you want to change something, just tell me. I know it's not personal. My feeling aren't going to get hurt.' Having established that before we even played a single note together, we've always had clear communication." Cosentino adds, "This record would not have been anywhere near what it is without Bobb Bruno. I owe so much to him. I am so thankful have him in my life and having him turn these things I write in my bedroom into epic songs."

Since the album's release, Best Coast has toured concert halls and festival stages around the world, appeared on David Letterman, Jimmy Fallon, Conan O'Brien and the cover of Spin Magazine, featured in a Microsoft television commercial and in campaigns for Bushmills, Clarks and Rdio, created a fashion line for Urban Outfitters, dueted with Iggy Pop and Kendrick Lamar, had music featured on Girls and The New Girl, and will be opening the entire Green Day arena tour in 2013.

Quicksand

Quicksand is an American post-hardcore band from New York City founded in 1990. Their debut self-titled EP was followed by two major label albums, Slip and Manic Compression. Quicksand's sound has been compared to that of post-hardcore/alternative metal bands Fugazi and Helmet.[1] The band supported their releases with extensive touring but fell short of the mainstream success anticipated by their labels. These factors and internal stress led them to separate first in 1995 and ultimately disband in 1999 following a failed year-and-a-half reunion.[2] In June 2012, Quicksand reunited for a special one-night performance and since has been playing additional live shows.

The second collaboration between singer/songwriter Kevin Devine and Andy Hull of Manchester Orchestra, "Bad Books II" finds these two extraordinary tunesmiths untethered from their respective brands, joining forces to reach new stylistic and emotional terrain. Accompanied by members of Manchester Orchestra -- with guitarist Robert McDowell also producing and keyboardist/percussionist Chris Freeman once again supplying distinctive album art -- Hull and Devine offer up a series of magnificently etched songs which light upon everything from anthemic stadium rock ("The After Party") and reflective balladry ("42") to energetic bubblegum ("No Sides"), gloriously baroque psychedelia ("Petite Mort"), and whistling big-beat pop ("Forest Whitaker"). The real-time sound of a group of talented friends synthesizing into something altogether more cohesive and accessible, "Bad Books II" reveals a remarkable new band in the truest sense, emboldened and at ease enough to set out together for places unknown.

Mission Of Burma

From the outset, 'Unsound' was not going to be like any other Mission of Burma album. As expected, the material is raw, primal and aggressive. They still have a signature knack for twisting even the most ferocious noise into complex structures. There are, of course, those killer hooks scattered throughout, but just not quite where you would expect. Yet with all three lead members resolutely making the decision to deliberately stretch their boundaries even further, they stepped out of their comfort zone to create their most rewarding, bewildering and multifaceted long-player yet. With a new label home, 'Unsound' will be released on Fire Records in July.

'Unsound' is Mission of Burma's fifth studio album, continuing their remarkable legacy. It seems redundant now to even call it a comeback because they're a dynamic, current band. Originally together just four years, from 1979-83, Mission of Burma reformed in 2002 for a handful of shows...which let to more concerts, then more, and eventually the release of 2004's "ONoffON", their first new recording in over twenty years. But no one expected them to just keep putting out records, let alone records that were every bit as vital and influential as their seminal early recordings. Their first album 'Vs' is down in the annals of time as being one of the most important post-punk records ever. Their subsequent recordings: "ONoffON", "The Obliterati", "The Sound, The Speed, The Light", and now, "Unsound", continue to grow in scope, depth and accomplishment with every step.

On "Unsound" we see Mission of Burma messing with their comfort zone by recording in their Boston rehearsal space which doubles as a recording studio: Analog Divide. As usual, Roger Miller (guitar, vocals), Clint Conley (bass, vocals) and Peter Prescott (drums, vocals) share the songwriting credits with their distinct styles. All of them tried their hand at other instruments and sounds, allowing them to take risks with their creativity and giving them a more fluid line-up. Of course, regular fourth member Bob Weston (of Shellac) was on hand to provide the tape loops and production duties.

As part of the manifesto to stretch musical boundaries, Roger wrote two of his songs ("Opener" and "ADD in Unison") on the bass rather than guitar. Another ("Dust Devil") was based on an acoustic guitar improvisation. Both Clint and Peter also tweaked their writing just enough to make them feel it was actually worthwhile making another record. They also decided to use trumpet on the record, so Bob pulled out his trumpet playing skills to oblige. Peter Prescott describes the experience: "We are a four headed hydra trying to create unity without canceling or censoring each head. So we juggle melody, groove, noise, depression, disruption, ecstasy... tension, release. I guess it's thrilling for us to walk that musical tightrope."

Clint Conley describes being in the studio: "There were certain technological advances, as well, that might have been unthinkable just a few short years ago, in a distant time and century. During the mix at Woolly Mammoth, Peter occasionally opted for a virtual presence. From time to time a hologram of his head would appear, hovering in a darkened corner, issuing directives and encouragement. Not to say there weren't occasional glitches in the system. For a few days the hologram seemed locked in a mystifying loop, calling for more cymbals, regardless of whether the band were working on a mix or ordering Vietnamese food."

The results are spectacularly successful. With 'Unsound', Mission of Burma has achieved its goal of making something utterly unique and stretching the realms of musical possibility. Mission of Burma's curiosity and creativity remain undiminished. The graph just keeps rising...the boundaries breaking...and the ears ringing. Long may it continue.Playing a bracing mix of punk, pop, art rock, and avant-garde experimentation, the Boston quartet's vocal/guitar/bass/drums/tape manipulation line-up was relentlessly intense and dynamic. As adept at playing strident, angular blasts as they were at powerful, pretty instrumentals, Mission Of Burma were integral in laying the foundation for a movement in postpunk rock which remains vital today. Formed in February 1979, when guitarist/vocalist Roger Miller and bassist/vocalist Clint Conley, fresh from the break-up of the band Moving Parts, decided to join forces with drummer/vocalist Peter Prescott, who had just parted company with The Molls. M.O.B. worked as a trio until the summer of 1979, when they drafted Martin Swope to provide what was commonly seen as the "x- factor" in their sound.
Like such truly seminal artists as the Velvet Underground and the Stooges, Mission Of Burma's stature and influence continue to grow; their material remains of a caliber that is rarely paralleled in creativity or integrity. Welcome back!

Saves The Day

Life has its share of ups and downs and no one knows that better than Saves The Day frontman Chris Conley. For the past seventeen years Conley has been bearing his soul and reinventing his musical identity with each successive step, a process that is clearly culminating with Saves The Day's seventh full-length Daybreak. The third part of a trilogy that also includes 2006's Sound The Alarm and 2007's Under The Boards, the act's latest disc sees Conley moving past the anger and frustration that has defined the band's last two albums and rediscovering a sense of wonder with the world that he can't wait to share with his listeners.

Daybreak is also the first Saves The Day album to feature guitarist Arun Bali, bassist Rodrigo Palma and drummer Spencer Peterson (the latter of whom was replaced by Claudio Rivera shortly after the album was completed) and Conley insists that his band's participation and encouragement was integral to the final product. "This album wouldn't have been as good as it is now if we had put it out two years ago and I think the reason for that is because there's a renewed energy in the band with this new line-up," Conley explains, adding that many of these songs were initially recorded in 2009 with the band's previous line-up but never felt right to him. "I feel like I have a united group for the first time ever and that feels like a gift."

That transformed spirit is evident in every note of Daybreak (which was co-produced by the band and longtime collaborator Marc Hudson) from the ten-minute long, five-movement self-titled opener to instantly infectious pop gems like "Let It Go" and "Living Without Love." That said, Daybreak also sees the band stretching out musically on the middle-eastern-inflected "Chameleon" and incorporating full-fledged guitar solos on "Deranged & Desperate." "This album is so much more musical [then the past two albums] because my heart was coming back to life while I was writing this and I was starting to be okay with myself," Conley explains. "In a way I was in the same mindset that I was in when I wrote [2003's major-label debut] In Reverie. I felt like I was on cloud nine."

Conley's positive outlook took a dejected turn shortly after In Reverie's touring cycle ended, due to both external and internal pressures—and the making of this trilogy is as much an artistic statement as it is a chronicle of Conley's own cathartic journey from the depths of his own insecurity into accepting himself and the world for what they are. "I was so angry when I wrote Sound The Alarm and then I was looking back on all these situations with Under The Boards," Conley explains, adding that a major turning point in his outlook was catalyzed by the recent birth of his daughter. "I didn't want her to face the world the way I faced the world which was fighting, kicking and screaming so I decided I was going to bring myself back to life with this album."

This therapeutic journey is evident on every song on Daybreak, mostly literally on tracks like "1984," which starts with the Under The Boards-esque statement "I'm dead inside and dying every day," but quickly resolves into "I need your love/I'm trying to rise above/I need you to bring me back to life," during the song's chorus. "I recognize what happened to me and now that I lived through it I can look back on it which is why I think the music breathes more on this album," he explains. "The songs feel more expansive because there wasn't the anger or confusion that dominated the first two albums in the trilogy," he continues. "Daybreak feels like a huge sigh of relief to me."

Conley is also quick to point out that despite its serious subject matter and introspective nature, he actually had a good time making Daybreak. "Trying to tie all of those strange themes and currents and raw emotions from Sound The Alarm and Under The Boards was an absolute a blast," he says. "I had a huge chart where I listed all of the lyrics I had compiled for this album as well as the past two and I was drawing lines from one song to another; writing Daybreak was like trying to finish a screen play because I had to take all of these themes that just flowed out of me and through organizing this thoughts I was also able to make sense of my life."

The word Conley says most while describing Daybreak is "acceptance"—and whether you've followed his music since Saves The Day's hardcore-inflected '90s output or are a recent convert to the band, you'll still be able to enjoy the album as a singular statement on what it means to let go. "This feels like I've wrapped up a chapter in my life and now I'm faced with a new beginning," Conley says. "I can honestly say that I couldn't be more excited about the future of this band."

Bayside lead singer/rhythm guitarist and founding member Anthony Raneri has been waiting 10 years—since he formed the rock group in Queens, N.Y. in the winter of 2000—to make an album like Killing Time, which represents a number of firsts for the band named after his hometown.

The album is the band's debut for new label Wind-up Records after four releases on Chicago-based indie Victory Records, including Sirens and Condolences (2004), Bayside (2005), The Walking Wounded (2007) and Shudder (2008), steadily growing their following through tireless touring. Recording their latest at Dreamland Studios in Woodstock, N.Y., and Water Music in Hoboken, N.J., with renowned producer Gil Norton [Foo Fighters, Counting Crows, Pixies, Jimmy Eat World], Bayside finally had the time and resources to fulfill their creative vision.

Peter Hook & The Light

Following their sold out debut UK concerts in January 2013, Peter Hook & The Light are to debut their critically acclaimed performances of the first two New Order albums, "Movement" (1981) and "Power, Corruption & Lies" (1983) to North American audiences for the first time in September 2013.

In the first of a string of international dates to be announced for The Light, this nine date run of the United States along with three dates in Canada sees the band return to cities previously visited, as well as some for the first time, and marks their third tour of North America after dates in December 2010 and September 2011 performing Joy Division's "Unknown Pleasures" and "Closer" albums.

All of the shows feature full performances of both albums in full, sequential order, which has become a hallmark of The Light's sets, and will also include singles and B-Sides from the corresponding period including "Everything's Gone Green", "Temptation" and "Blue Monday" which New Order generally didn't include on the releases, preferring their LPs to stand alone in comparison to the singles.

Both albums mark the early development of New Order's sound whilst also, notably on "Movement", referring back to the Joy Division template. The final album from the band to be produced by Martin Hannett, Movement's reputation has grown stronger amongst fans since release for its experimentation, Peter Hook taking lead vocals on two of the album's key tracks, opener "Dreams Never End" and the seminal "Doubts Even Here"

Reggie And The Full Effect

Reggie and the Full Effect have always been a mystery. Who are they? What do they want? Where do they come from? There have, of course, been explanations. Studio fires, faked deaths, cryptic bios and tall tales of many sorts were countered by rumors that James Dewees—keyboardist for rock heroes The Get Up Kids' and drummer for seminal metalcore act Coalesce—was somehow behind all the crazy characters taking credit for Reggie and the Full Effect's synth-rock goodness. First there was the enigmatic Reggie, the band's apparent namesake and protagonist in a strange musical tale beginning with the release of the band's Greatest Hits 1984-1987 in 1998, followed closely by Promotional Copy in 2000. Then there was the mustachioed frontman Paco, who came to the fore on 2003's Under the Tray, and album which also featured an ever-growing cast of characters—Finnish metal band Common Denominator, English synth-pop god Fluxuation, death growler Hungary Bear, the ubiquitous Drunk Guy at the Get Up Kids Show—increasing both the band's popularity and perplexing mystique.

However, on Reggie and the Full Effect's new record, Songs Not To Get Married To, James Dewees is ready to come clean about his role as songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and mad scientist behind Reggie and the Full Effect. "Paco's dead now," proclaims Dewees, AKA Reggie, AKA Paco, AKA Klause from Common Denominator, AKA Fluxuation. "This record's more about me getting divorced; about working really hard for a really long time, then having everything taken away from you for no reason whatsoever other than somebody has the power to do it," he says. "Big man crushes small man syndrome." Granted, the history of the band's comical antics, song titles such as "The Fuck Stops Here," and the record's seemingly too-literal-to-be-true title might lead one to believe that Dewees merely jests about his inspiration for Songs Not To Get Married To. But Dewees insists that he is all too sincere about the theme for his latest masterpiece. The album opens with "What the Hell is Contempt?" a song, he says, inspired by his divorce court proceedings. "They called me up and said that were going to sue me for contempt," remembers Dewees. "And I was like 'what the hell is contempt?'" I don't even know what it is and I'm going to get sued for it."

But don't get out your handkerchief just yet. Songs Not to Get Married To, isn't all seriousness. Songs like the grinding metal number "The Trooth,"—which Dewees says is "about me having to go get a tooth pulled in the middle of recording. I tried to save it but they threw the tooth away. It was fucking gross."— and the dance-y "Dethnotronic" featuring Common Denominator and Hungary Bear, as well as snippets like "Guess Who's Back" and "Laura's Australian Dance Party" are all classic Reggie: switching genres at the drop of a hat, mixing irreverence and humor with razor-sharp guitars and sugar-coated melodies. And like Under the Tray, Songs Not To Get Married To was recorded at producer Ed Rose's Black Lodge Studios in Kansas, and includes guest spots by what Dewees refers to as his "all star friends," including Ryan and Robert Pope of The Get Up Kids, Benjamin Perri of From Autumn to Ashes, and Sean Ingram and Cory White from Coalesce. "I can always call in my all-star friends to help me out when I need them," says Dewees with a laugh. "With everybody being from the same small scene, we're all friends. Even as the scene is getting bigger, our friendships are all still like they were before. We all go out and get drunk together and bum cigarettes and money from each other all the time."

Though there is still the requisite silliness and genre-melding that fans of Reggie and the Full Effect have come to expect, Song Not To Get Married To is nevertheless a cathartic, one might even say serious record, at least by Reggie standards. "Everybody who's heard it so far has noticed that it was more serious," agrees James Dewees. "There's actually lyrics and songs not just about girls running away." But there are also plenty of fake accents, techno dance beats and Slayer-esque metal riffs to allay any concerns that Reggie has gone totally straight. "It's still Reggie," says Dewees. "There's still the humor there, it's just taking things a little more serious, doing it a little bit more subtly."

Songs Not To Get Married To is a look at the man behind the curtain, the record that finally proves once and for all that James Dewees is Reggie and the Full Effect, and that Reggie and the Full Effect is, in fact, James Dewees. Such a personal record deserves a personal bio, or at least a personal end to a regular bio. So here is a message from James Dewees, AKA Reggie, to you, the recipient of this bio. The message is as follows: "This is my new record. It is a little less silly than the last three, but I recently got divorced and lost everything so I don't have much to celebrate these days. However, I am still a happy camper, just single camping now. I hope you enjoy the new record and if my ex-wife is one of those unknown people who gets one of these bios…wow, you scored hella good huh?"

The Wonder Years

"The whole world's full of losers," sings Wonder Years frontman Dan "Soupy" Campbell on "Washington Square Park," from the band's second full-length record, The Upsides, "but if you get a chance to win, take it."

Perhaps no quote better describes The Wonder Years' career to date. A band that started as something of a joke grew to become recognized around the country courtesy of a sloppy debut LP that flicked some sort of switch. People were paying attention to them. People were listening to them. People liked them. This was, as they say, opportunity knocking. The Wonder Years had a chance to win, and they took it.

Releasing The Upsides in January 2010, a complete departure from The Wonder Years' early work, was just the beginning of an ongoing avalanche of momentum that has led the Philadelphia sextet to the forefront of the pop-punk community. Engaging musicianship, reaching far beyond the repetitive droning of most of the genre, and intimate, instantly relatable lyricism made The Wonder Years a critical darling even before hordes of fans began to take notice. But it didn't take long for everyone to jump on board. Signing to Hopeless Records with their brand of "realist pop-punk" and re-releasing The Upsides with bonus tracks brought about new buzz, and the release of the sprawling, 13-track concept record Suburbia I've Given You All and Now I'm Nothing in June of 2011 confirmed what many thought: The Wonder Years were for real.

Playing shows in basements, backyards and VFW halls the country over in its early years, the band had a DIY mentality long before it broke through to a larger audience. "The idea was that, for a long time, no one wanted to work with The Wonder Years so we said fuck it, we'll do it ourselves," Campbell says. "The idea was that we didn't need anyone else. We weren't looking for charity. We were just going to cowboy up and fucking do it."

Campbell, guitarists Matt Brasch and Casey Cavaliere, keyboardist/guitarist Nick Steinborn, bassist Joshua Martin and drummer Michael Kennedy have known what it's like to play to 10 kids in Salt Lake City…but their mindset hasn't changed, even when playing to 1,000 kids in Boston. This mentality and determination has resulted in The Wonder Years never taking a day off, always going the extra mile to interact with fans, playing emotionally draining live shows, and, most of all, leaving a legacy in their recorded music. The group is still "involved in every aspect of the band," according to Campbell, so everything that comes out is as good as it can be.

The Wonder Years graced the cover of Alternative Press, played an entire summer on the Vans Warped Tour, and opened for New Found Glory on the Pop Punk's Not Dead Tour to close out 2011. They opened 2012 in a huge way, with the Glamour Kills Tour, which Campbell called the band's "first big-boy headliner." Leading Polar Bear Club, Transit, The Story So Far, A Loss for Words and Into It. Over It. across the country for six weeks of sold-out shows proved that The Wonder Years are still growing, still making new friends, and still breaking new boundaries.

The band's current success can largely be traced to Suburbia. The album explores the concept of feeling displaced from your home among other concepts, providing a wealth of relatable lyricism for fans to delve into. "There's an understanding, at least in my high school English class, that the best authors write about what they know," Martin says. "We just write about what we know and what we feel because it makes the most sense to us. We just strive to write music and lyrics with substance."

The Wonder Years have become notable in the best way imaginable – by being themselves. By wearing their collective heart on their proverbial sleeve. And by taking every chance they get to win.

Maps & Atlases

In a musical landscape pitted with pop stars and pigeonholes, Maps & Atlases defy easy categorization, choosing to walk their own incomparable path. Beware and Be Grateful builds upon the Chicago-based band's acclaimed Barsuk Records debut, Perch Patchwork, melding their trademark experimentalism with a more direct – though no less beguiling – songcraft. The new album abounds with invention, spanning hymnal harmonies, percolating rhythms, even, in the case of centerpiece track "Silver Self," a full-on guitar solo. Songs like "Remote and Dark Years" and "Winter" are gloriously liquid and lyrical, channeling M&A's maximalist creativity into a truly inviting brand of boundary-busting, asymmetrical pop.

"We wanted there to be more ins," says guitarist/vocalist Dave Davison. "We wanted it to be really engaging. We wanted it to be fun, in addition to being different."

Guitarist Erin Elders adds, "we've always been interested in writing songs that people can walk away from with some sort of emotional connection, while still trying to explore our own musical obsessions and the weird ideas we want to pursue."

Since their formation in 2004, Maps & Atlases – that is, Davison, Elders, bassist Shiraz Dada, and drummer Chris Hainey – have captured the indie imagination with polyrhythmic beats, elaborate melodies, and post-rock ingenuity. Arriving on the heels of two highly rated EPs, 2010's Perch Patchwork proved both a popular and artistic breakthrough, earning the devotion of an increasingly fervent fanbase as well as reams of critical applause. "Maps & Atlases make technical virtuosity fun," declared Filter, while American Songwriter praised the album as a "beautifully oddball symphony…equal parts lo-fi and hi-tech."

M&A spent much of 2010 and '11 on the road, honing their kinetic time signatures and inventive energy both as headliners and alongside such artists as RX Bandits, CircaSurvive, Cults, and Portugal. The Man. Demos were recorded between tours with Perch Patchwork producer Jason Cupp (Good Old War, Nurses), paving the way for sessions at Omaha's ARC Studios – the band's first time working in a conventional recording facility, having previously recorded largely in home studios and other "places where you have unlimited time, without having to pay for it," according to Davison.

In preparation, Maps & Atlases united to explore arrangement ideas and tweak material at Davison's parents' house in suburban Lake County, Indiana. Much of their work on arrangements was conducted on a number of what Davison describes as "weird little battery-powered keyboards" that he and Cupp had purchased at a Chicago farmer's market. The addition of keyboards into Maps & Atlases' creative arsenal served as a seismic aesthetic shift for a band that had always shied away from even the simplest guitar pedals.

"When we first started as a band, we were a lot more adamant about the music being this very organic thing," Elders says. "But slowly we've grown to want to experiment with

texture, and keyboards were a great way to do that. They also helped guide the songs, they kept things fresh. It's good to step out of your comfort zone and try new things."

Though most of the keyboards' "strange sounds" were replaced by guitars on the final recording, they unlocked a new musical mindset in Maps & Atlases, opening the band to alternatives to their customarily naturalistic approach. At ARC, they toyed with fresh textural elements, recording the sound of light bulbs being smashed or of a microphone placed in a box and then rolled down a flight of stairs.

"We threw down as many ideas as we possibly could," Elders says, "as fast as we could."

The band broke the recording sessions into weeklong chunks, taking time away to evaluate their work periodically. Elders describes the band's nurturing approach towards the material as "a long layering/unlayering process. By doing it in installments, we were able to let the songs unfold."

The recordings included pieces that been fermenting throughout M&A's lifetime, with songs like "Old Ash" and the extraordinary "Remote And Dark Years" now utterly transformed by the band's forward momentum and Davison's increasingly potent songwriting skills.

Whereas prior songs featured a somewhat fragmented, refracted lyricism, Davison has begun tackling the big existential questions in more forthright fashion.

"It's just thinking about meaning," he says, "a sort of back-and-forth between ideas and emotion versus just existing in the world."

That core metaphysical to-and-fro is manifested by the album's widescreen spatial dynamics, what Elders describes as "an open-endedness." Free to let their ideas run wild, Maps & Atlases truly let fly: Beware and Be Grateful is a breathtaking panopticon of incantatory choral vocals, seesawing grooves, and of course, their inimitable six string complexity, all of which are pushed farther that the band had ever anticipated.

"There are things on this album that I never thought it would be possible for us to do when we first started," Davison says, adding wryly, "For one thing, my 20-year- old self would not have been super-pumped-up about me playing a guitar solo on anything."

With its blend of avant garde audacity and pop craftsmanship, Beware and Be Grateful stands firmly in the great art rock tradition, a model synthesis of novelty and tradition, of listen ability and invention. Maps & Atlases have crafted a collection of resplendently human music, its intricate dynamics wholly matched by ornate wells of deep emotion.

"We're all quietly excited," Elders says. make and have been striving to make.

"For us, this is the record we've always wanted to We're very proud of it."

Chuck Ragan

Simply put, they don't make musicians like Chuck Ragan anymore. For nearly two decades Ragan has traversed the country and the world—first with his celebrated punk act Hot Water Music and later as a solo troubadour—to bring his music to the masses. Correspondingly Ragan's third solo album Covering Ground is as much of a love letter to his transient lifestyle as it as a concession to the loved ones he often has to leave behind and is also undeniably his most honest and accomplished album to date.

Featuring longtime collaborator/fiddle player Jon Gaunt and bassist Joe Ginsberg in addition to guest appearances from the Gaslight Anthem's Brian Fallon, Blind Melon's Chris Thorn, Squirrel Nut Zippers' Chris Phillips, Frank Turner and Audra Mae, Covering Ground is the sonic equivalent to Jack Kerouac's On The Road and could only be created by someone who requires a release like this in order to stay sane. "The majority of these songs were written on the road," Ragan explains. "We've been running hard and burning the candle at both ends for the past few years which has been amazing in many ways, but you end up making a massive amount of sacrifices to sustain that type of lifestyle."

This duality lies at the core of Covering and when Ragan sings about "ten cylinders that fire and a woman at the end of the road" on the driving acoustic song "Wish On The Moon," it's dripping with so much authenticity that it's hard not to imagine yourself behind the wheel alongside Ragan. "Writing has always been a form of therapy for me and something that I feel like I need to do rather than something I'm supposed to do," Ragan responds when asked where the fire behind this songs originated. "Since I've started doing the solo thing in 2005 I've been consistently writing and I'm not worried about whether I finish a song, I just want to get this down to unburden my soul."

Musically Covering Ground sees Ragan peeling back the layers of his songwriting style and allowing the talented cast of musicians to fill out the arrangements with their own voices. "I really wanted to do a record that was going to transfer seamlessly into the live setting since we all spend so much time on the road," Ragan explains. "I wanted this album to have more of a stripped-down and organic approach than [2009's] Gold Country." Correspondingly Gaunt's fiddle effortlessly weaves melody lines over Ragan's workman like acoustic guitar playing while peers like Fallon and Turner's guest vocals help add layers of depth to songs like "Nothing Left To Prove" and "Wish On The Moon."

Despite the fact that Ragan is working with instrumentation that has existed for hundreds of years, Covering Ground is also a remarkably diverse-sounding album and showcases the range Ragan is now able to attain with his whiskey-soaked pipes. In fact from the impassioned hymns such as "Meet You In The Middle" to gospel-inflected numbers like "Right As Rain" and instantly recognizable tunes like "Nothing Left To Prove," all of which prove how much Ragan's arrangements have grown since his first two releases. "Making this music is our passion but at the same time it's our livelihood," Ragan says. "It's easy to get jaded on the road; the struggle is trying to find that balance between work and passion."

Speaking of the road, since Gold Country Ragan has toured with everyone from Social Distortion to the Gaslight Anthem in addition to his own headlining shows and his appearances on the Revival Tour, a traveling road show that he started in 2008. "The tours we've done over the past few years have been incredible because we've played for a wide range of folks who wouldn't normally have any idea that we're around and that's a huge opportunity," Ragan explains. "I feel like if people spend their time, money and energy to give us the time of day then we're going to give them everything we've got every night."

That spirit of giving it his all is what separates Ragan from other songwriters and is also what makes Covering Ground such a timeless album that follows in the tradition of folk pioneers like Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger. "I used to build houses with a good friend of mine and even though I'm doing this now the parallels in our lives are still identical," Ragan muses. "One thing he said with me that really stuck was that we have two choices in life: you either roll with the punches or lie down—and only one of those is a choice for people like us," he summarizes. "Being a musician is a lot easier that some of the other jobs I've had, but I've still made the choice to work hard and keep going and that's a rule I live by every single day."

Peelander-Z

PEELANDER-Z, the Japanese Action Comic Punk Band based in NYC, was originally formed in 1998 by Peelander-Yellow, Peelander-Red, and Peelander-Blue, after meeting in New York City (although they'll tell you they're all from the Z area on the planet Peelander). Peelander-Green was welcomed in July 2008 after Blue left the band.

Peelander-Z has appeared at major music festivals including Bonnaroo, CMJ and SXSW, and played with artists such as Buckethead, Electric SIx, Particles, The Vibrators, and Guitar Wolf. Peelander-Z has also been featured on TV programs like VH1's Best Week Ever, Comedy Central's Upright Citizens Brigade, Spike TV's MXC: Most Extreme Challenge, and Anime Network. They also often perform at Anime conventions and festivals all over the US, as well as at Kaiju Big Battel.

At their live show, you'll see the band in colorful costumes reminiscent of Japanese Animation, though they describe their outfit as their skin. Their shows guarantee intense audience participation and chance to exercise with the band. "Do human bowling with us. Do limbo dancing with us. Do karaoke competition with us. Hit our cowbell with us," says Yellow. " Don't be shy, give us your smile! We can beat your stress! See you at our show!"
One experience would capture you. Just pay attention to their coming activities.

Touche Amore

"Life is divided into the horrible and the miserable" - Woody Allen

Although from the mouth of a famed comedian, it's difficult to overlook an epigraph that has the potential to resonate with so many people. This is not to say that everything on this planet is negative, as the quote suggests. It is to say, however, that a great many of us take a look around and ask, "When did things get so shitty?" This, of course, happens on a daily basis. Especially with us Americans.

Five of these inquisitive U.S. natives are sprinkled in amongst the other 3.8 million people who live in Los Angeles, California. Coming together in late 2007, Touche Amore (as the collective group is known) plays hardcore that aims at making their listeners aware of a few things that "ruffle the band's feathers"...so to speak. The quintet's sound has been linked to"traditional" screamo bands like Orchid, pageninetynine and Hot Cross, while also being called reminiscent of the more straight-up" approaches of outfits like American Nightmare, Curl Up & Die and even Jawbreaker.

With a healthy amount of shows already played alongside bands like Trash Talk and The Carrier, Touche Amore is now looking to the future: a dense schedule of performances in various states, and their debut release on 7-inch vinyl out this summer on No Sleep Records.

Looking to have fun in a city near you.

Deal's Gone Bad

What do you get when you mix the chugging rhythms of Jamaica, the energy and emotion of American Motown, and the overthe-top pub/rock of the Pogues? Now in their 14th year, Deal's Gone Bad is touring extensively with its strongest and most consistent line-up in its history. With elements of ska, rocksteady, reggae, and American soul, DGB is sure to please on the dancefloor as well as on their fourth release to date, "The Ramblers" on Megalith and Jump Up! Records (March, 2007). Although the band draws its influences from classic Jamaican (Desmond Dekker, Jimmy Cliff, Ken Boothe) and American (Otis Redding, Sam Cooke, The Temptations) artists, the sound is a uniquely modern combination, unlike anything else on the scene today. Deal's Gone Bad will appeal to fans of both soul and Jamaican music, as well as anyone looking for a turn on the floor or a song in their hearts. While "The Ramblers" is a testament to the strength of the songwriting, as well as the close-your-eyes-and-its-Otis voice of Todd Hembrook (his first record with the group), it is in live performance where the boys truly shine. Deal's Gone Bad shows are a combination of soul rave-up and island dance party, with the force and energy of any punk band worth their salt. Lace up your dancing shoes and slip into your sharpest suit or pencil skirt, Deal's Gone Bad is coming to your town so get ready!

No Dale Cooper, Laura Palmer, Black Lodge or Donna Hayward. No midnight trysts over the border at One Eyed Jacks. Instead, itinerant fuzzy rock & roll from a bunch of young Turks who call Chicago home.

After playing in various bands throughout their teenage years, Twin Peaks - Cadien, Clay, Connor, and Jack - self-released their self-recorded album, and completed a 3 week self-booked tour in the Summer of '12. Since then, the industrious lads attended college for a semester, promptly dropped out, played SXSW, and are slated to re-release their Sunken debut via Aquarium Drunkard's Autumn Tone Records this June. Sunken rolls catchy hooks, chorused guitars, chugging rhythms, and blasts of pure rock & roll snarl into one super-tight album. While there is no shortage of sophistication in their arrangements, Twin Peaks' songs eschew the bullshit and stay true to their youthful reality -- pretty girls, smoking & drinking in the park, wilding around the streets of Chicago. Unapologetic. Honest. Fresh out of the garage.

White Mystery

Francis Scott Key White and Miss Alex White are the brother-sister duo that is White Mystery, a Chicago rock'n'roll band founded on April 20, 2008. Inspired by a candy flavor of the same name, White Mystery has since visited the Airheads candy factory and was photographed by PORK magazine in a bathtub full of the sweets. MTV features the band as a "Top 5 Sibling Act," "Best Video Premiere," and places White Mystery songs prominently in their television programming.

Since her early teen years, Miss Alex White played in garage bands Miss Alex White & the Red Orchestra and Hot Machines, bootstrapped DIY record label Missile X Records, and recorded with In the Red Records. Guitar World named her a "Top 10 Female Guitarist to Look Out For" for the supercharged riffs that blast out of her Rickenbacker, through a Big Muff, and out of the amplifier that Orange Amps sponsors her with. She shares a birthday with Willie Nelson, and Wayne Kramer from the MC5.

Francis Scott Key White has the most patriotic name in rock'n'roll music, shares a birthday with Keith Moon from the Who, and evokes the energy of British heavy hitters John Bonham from Led Zeppelin and Bill Ward from Black Sabbath. As a kid, Francis dreamed of joining his older sister on her tours around the world, and now with White Mystery has played almost every state in the USA, Canada, and embarks on a European Tour in 2013.

White Mystery debuts new music on its band anniversary every year, with a 4/20 celebration of vinyl, cds, and digital downloads. Together, the siblings self-released their first "White Mystery" full-length album in 2010 and sophomore record "Blood & Venom" in 2011 to the critical acclaim of Pitchfork, VICE, The Chicago Tribune, LA Weekly, The Austin Chronicle, and Village Voice. Cassette and vinyl seven-inch releases on Burger Records, HoZac, and Perpetrator have widened the bands' fan base considerably.

White Mystery "Telepathic" is the band's third full-length, recorded in Oakland with Greg Ashley, to be released in on April 20, 2013 at Brick & Mortar in San Francisco.

Hostage Calm

Please Remain Calm is the punk album of the Great Recession. The Connecticut five-piece has crafted an album that captures the defeat, the heartache--what it feels like to be young in the American Decline. Following up 2010's critically acclaimed self-titled LP, Please Remain Calm combines elements of Springsteen-esque heartland rock with the band's signature blend of 60s pop melody, 70s punk energy and 80s new wave panache.

Hostage Calm begin Please Remain Calm with weaving counter-melodic guitars and bass, stitched together with anthemic choruses. Openers 'On Both Eyes', 'Don't Die On Me Now' and 'Brokenheartland' take the listener through all of the band's signature stylings, setting the mood as the album reveals greater depth and dynamism. A slower, more intimate version of the band's classic 'The "M" Word' features an orchestral arrangement, complete with strings, brass, keys and concert percussion. Immediately following this, the band delivers perhaps its most avant-guarde arrangement, 'Patriot'; a full a capella ode to a lost love affair with America. What opens as a very electrifying, hit-driven album fully descends into some of the band's most intricate and moving work to date.

But Please Remain Calm is more than Hostage Calm's opus: it's their manifesto. Like how London Calling captured the gray and grinding Britain of 1979, this album calls to mind the hopeless college student moving back in with her parents, the bank boarding up the house next door, and the impossibility of love in a time where nothing moves forward. Pushing musical boundaries at every turn, Please Remain Calm never loses its feeling of timelessness.

Environmental Encroachment

Chicago-based performance art group Environmental Encroachment (EE) uses circus theatrics, live music and costumes to create unique entertainment environments, parades, processions, shows, punk artist marching band encroachments and art happenings.
EE combines a costumed marching band with multi-media stage performance antics, including dancers, hooping, juggling and skits. EE encourages people to interact, be a part, be curious, dance, play.
EE can expand to the size of your event - stage shows, mobile experiences, children's shows, Holiday events, street busking, tactical comic encroachments, festivals, rituals, ceremonies, vaudevillian skits, electric and acoustic music jams, funerals and births.

$59.98

Sold Out

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
** Buy Early For Best Price **
Limited Number of Tickets Available at Discounted Prices (see sections below for details)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

SUNDAY GENERAL ADMISSION (Sold Out):
– General Admission Entry to Humboldt Park on Sept. 15th


SUNDAY VIP (Sold Out):
- Admission into Humboldt Park grounds, 9/15
- Access to VIP lounges with private bar
- Access to VIP viewing areas near the stage

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Rain or Shine event. No refunds or exchanges. Tickets are non-transferable. All event information, including line-up, is subject to change.

Upcoming Events
Humboldt Park

  • Sorry, there are currently no upcoming events.