A Day To Remember

Rising from the punk rock hotbed of Florida in 2003, Josh Woodard (bass), Alex Shellnutt (drums), Neil Westfall (guitar), Jeremy McKinnon (vocals) and Tom Denney (guitar) formed A DAY TO REMEMBER, crafting a blend of the music they loved into a niche of their own. Their debut on Indianola records sold 8,000 copies with little promotion, and attracted the attention of Victory Records, who signed them in 2006. "When we first got signed, our goal wasn't to blow up or even sell a ton of records," recalls bassist Josh Woodward. "All we wanted to do was stay on tour, and play to as many kids as possible." The result exceeded even their expectations, as the infectious, explosive energy of their live shows helped them organically grow a fanbase that multiplied each time they played.
With the release of their breakthrough album For Those Who Have Heart, A DAY TO REMEMBER went global. In the two short years after its release in early 2007, the band grew from a small band with a dedicated local fan-base into a worldwide phenomenon, gaining the respect and adoration from their peers as much as their fans. This is no overnight success – the band has worked hard to win over every fan they make. But the 'perfect storm' of their dedication, rapidly-spreading buzz and undeniable musical abilities have made this young band one of the most talked about bands in rock, gaining themselves a coveted slot in Alternative Press' Most Anticipated Albums 2009 issue.
Their new album Homesick sees them using their ascension as a springboard, ready to launch them into the big time. "Homesick is a culmination of 2 1/2 years of being gone on the road," Woodard notes. "It represents what we've been through, what's ahead of us,and the lessons we've learned in between. It's the heaviest and catchiest record we've ever written, and we couldn't be more excited for people to hear it. We're all so proud of what we just made, and think it really sets us up to jump to that next level." In an industry where you have to evolve to stay ahead, A DAY TO REMEMBER is standing defiant, leading the genre-straddling pack in a battle cry, ready for the fight of their lives. Grab your friends, "disrespect your surroundings", and watch A DAY TO REMEMBER set the world alight. The mainstream won't know what hit it.

Hey kid you’ve got a lot of potential but I think it’s time to move up,” are the first words you hear on The Party Scene (Emerald Moon Records), the debut full length from pop punk powerhouse ALL TIME LOW. When it comes to this band no statement could ring anymore true. As Absolutepunk.net says, “ALL TIME LOW has the potential to be the next Cartel or The Academy Is….Say hello to your new favorite pop punk band.”
Hailing from the suburbs of Baltimore, MD the group made up of singer/guitarist Alex Gaskarth, guitarist Jack Barakat, bassist Zack Merrick, and drummer Rian Dawson simply set out to make music people appreciated and what they found was something truly special. With unforgettable melodies, explosive guitar hooks, and relentlessly driving rhythms the message in their music is loud and clear, “We’re here and we’re here to stay”.
At the ripe old ages of seventeen and still in high school the band has already recorded their debut EP and their first full length The Party Scene was released in August. Their relentless DIY attitude and work ethic has made the record a near permanent fixture in the Smartpunk Top 20 sales list without the aid of a national distributor. “This is our life,” Alex says. “There is nothing else we see ourselves doing and we’re willing to do anything and everything to get where we want to be.” That means daily four hour practices and weekends spent driving across the country playing for anyone who will listen.
“We love recording but being a good live band is what we’ve really worked so hard on,” Jack explains. “We’ve had the chance to play with a lot of amazing bands and we’ve learned so many things that we’ve been able to incorporate into our show.” ALL TIME LOW plays to packed houses at Maryland’s biggest venues such as The Recher Theatre and The Ottobar, and traveled all over the country in the summer of 2005. They’ve shared the stage with national headliners such as Motion City Soundtrack, Acceptance, The Early November, The Receiving End of Sirens, The Academy Is…, Plain White T’s, Spitalfied, and many more.
With so many accomplishments at such a young age the natural reaction is to be content with what you’ve achieved, but not with this group. “Put up or Shut Up, We’re not wasting time again,” comes roaring out of Alex’s mouth on the song Breakout, Breakout. It’s a defiant statement. It’s a statement of confidence, desire, and singlemindedness that’s guaranteed to take ALL TIME LOW as high as they want to go.

Pierce The Veil

A lot has happened in the three years since Pierce The Veil released their debut A Flair For The Dramatic in 2007. The band have toured the world including Warped Tour in 2008 and Taste Of Chaos in 2009; converted countless fans to their unique brand of progressive post-hardcore; and, most notably, grown as both people and musicians from these cumulative experiences. All of this figures into the group's long-awaited sophomore release Selfish Machines, an album that sees the band-frontman Vic Fuentes, drummer Mike Fuentes, guitarist Tony Perry and bassist Jaime Preciado-coming together to craft an inventive album that is certain to challenge people's perception of the band.

Recorded with Mike Green (Paramore, Set Your Goals) in Los Angeles, the album ended up being more involved than initially planned-but that ended up being a blessing in disguise. "It was actually a pretty intense process," Vic explains, adding that the band didn't finish the album in the time allotted which forced him to stay in LA for an extra two months working on vocals and bouncing between recording studios working on new ideas. "It was definitely necessary to take the extra time with this recording," he continues. "We're not settling on anything with this record."

From the soaring pop sensibility of songs like "Bulletproof Love" to the upbeat aggression of "Caraphernelia", the album shows how versatile Pierce The Veil have become, whether they're screaming their hearts out or gently bearing their souls. There are also plenty of sonic surprises on Selfish Machines, most notably the emotive, piano-driven ballad "Stay Away From My Friends" which displays the band's growth as songwriters. "That song was my first crack at writing on piano," Vic explains. "I've got a piano in my house now so I'd been messing around on it and ended up writing some riffs, which I think definitely gave the album a different feel," he continues, adding that he hopes to eventually implement keyboards into the band's live performances.

Although Pierce The Veil have toured incessantly for the past three years, they made some time late last year to write these tracks and instantly threw themselves into the songwriting process. "It's pretty hard for us to write on the road because we're touring in an RV most of the time with tight quarters, which doesn't bode well for creativity," Vic acknowledges with a laugh. "We have a studio at home that I like to hang out in, so I basically just shut myself out from the world for three or four months and spent all day and night writing," he continues. "Every song is super personal; they're all very real about our lives and I think once people read them they can probably see a little bit about what's going on with us."

"We are all in one way or another selfish machines," Vic explains when asked about the album's title. "In no way is this a negative thing, it's human nature. We all have natural tendencies to want, love, and take. When it comes down to it, humans have animal like qualities that we keep inside and even try to deny-but no matter how morally good someone may think they are or try to be, we are still humans," he continues. "One example of this is how we are all constantly searching for someone to love, or even more desperately, someone to love you. It is human nature broken down to its bare bones, no bullshit, just rock bottom honest feelings and desire. No trying to be nice, shy, or respectable, it's about the 'evil' thing inside of us that is really not evil at all, it's just there and always will be inside of us all."

Having played with bands in nearly every subgenre, Pierce The Veil have always prided themselves on not confining their band to one particular scene or genre-and the harmony-rich songs like "I Don't Care If You're Contagious" are guaranteed to expose them to entirely new crowds of followers with Selfish Machines. "Every band that I've ever loved and admired has constantly grown and each record is a little different in their own way and I think that's how it should be because it keeps you setting new goals and trying to change for the better," Vic explains. "This record is definitely going to take us new places and after this we'll keep writing and try to make the next one even better," he summarizes. "We're always looking ahead."

The Wonder Years

"The whole world's full of losers," sings Wonder Years frontman Dan "Soupy" Campbell on "Washington Square Park," from the band's second full-length record, The Upsides, "but if you get a chance to win, take it."

Perhaps no quote better describes The Wonder Years' career to date. A band that started as something of a joke grew to become recognized around the country courtesy of a sloppy debut LP that flicked some sort of switch. People were paying attention to them. People were listening to them. People liked them. This was, as they say, opportunity knocking. The Wonder Years had a chance to win, and they took it.

Releasing The Upsides in January 2010, a complete departure from The Wonder Years' early work, was just the beginning of an ongoing avalanche of momentum that has led the Philadelphia sextet to the forefront of the pop-punk community. Engaging musicianship, reaching far beyond the repetitive droning of most of the genre, and intimate, instantly relatable lyricism made The Wonder Years a critical darling even before hordes of fans began to take notice. But it didn't take long for everyone to jump on board. Signing to Hopeless Records with their brand of "realist pop-punk" and re-releasing The Upsides with bonus tracks brought about new buzz, and the release of the sprawling, 13-track concept record Suburbia I've Given You All and Now I'm Nothing in June of 2011 confirmed what many thought: The Wonder Years were for real.

Playing shows in basements, backyards and VFW halls the country over in its early years, the band had a DIY mentality long before it broke through to a larger audience. "The idea was that, for a long time, no one wanted to work with The Wonder Years so we said fuck it, we'll do it ourselves," Campbell says. "The idea was that we didn't need anyone else. We weren't looking for charity. We were just going to cowboy up and fucking do it."

Campbell, guitarists Matt Brasch and Casey Cavaliere, keyboardist/guitarist Nick Steinborn, bassist Joshua Martin and drummer Michael Kennedy have known what it's like to play to 10 kids in Salt Lake City…but their mindset hasn't changed, even when playing to 1,000 kids in Boston. This mentality and determination has resulted in The Wonder Years never taking a day off, always going the extra mile to interact with fans, playing emotionally draining live shows, and, most of all, leaving a legacy in their recorded music. The group is still "involved in every aspect of the band," according to Campbell, so everything that comes out is as good as it can be.

The Wonder Years graced the cover of Alternative Press, played an entire summer on the Vans Warped Tour, and opened for New Found Glory on the Pop Punk's Not Dead Tour to close out 2011. They opened 2012 in a huge way, with the Glamour Kills Tour, which Campbell called the band's "first big-boy headliner." Leading Polar Bear Club, Transit, The Story So Far, A Loss for Words and Into It. Over It. across the country for six weeks of sold-out shows proved that The Wonder Years are still growing, still making new friends, and still breaking new boundaries.

The band's current success can largely be traced to Suburbia. The album explores the concept of feeling displaced from your home among other concepts, providing a wealth of relatable lyricism for fans to delve into. "There's an understanding, at least in my high school English class, that the best authors write about what they know," Martin says. "We just write about what we know and what we feel because it makes the most sense to us. We just strive to write music and lyrics with substance."

The Wonder Years have become notable in the best way imaginable – by being themselves. By wearing their collective heart on their proverbial sleeve. And by taking every chance they get to win.

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A Day To Remember with All Time Low, Pierce The Veil, The Wonder Years

Monday, September 30 · Doors 6:00 PM / Show 6:45 PM at Pershing Center