Dizzy Wright

“You just don’t become a leader in one year. You’re prepped for it. When you’re at your lowest—but you got that faith—that gives you motivation. And when you have that motivation, that’s what makes you a leader,” says Las Vegas native Dizzy Wright. Beyond his years at 22, Dizzy has been one of the first Sin City rappers to grab the spotlight and carry it across the globe.

“My mom kicked me out when I was 17,” Dizzy reveals of the woman who both raised him and managed his career since childhood, “I was thrown out into the world.” With a similar story to his inspiration, Tupac Shakur, he took to local clubs to build a network and fan-base by being both skilled and flashy. “I was all about getting people to know my name. I knew the vision, but I didn’t know the gesture. You’ve got to live through this to get an understanding of it.” Along the way, Wright says that life taught him to keep a tight circle and to be concerned with how his music sounded in venues just as much as the writing. That dichotomy of substance and swagger has made Dizzy Wright an independent charting sensation with three 2012 releases, SmokeOut Conversations (along with the 200,000 times downloaded promotional mixtape), as well as a follow-up EP, The First Agreement. In turn, the youngest member of Funk Volume has been one of the most active.

Although SmokeOut Conversations could be dismissed as just marijuana music, the inspiration behind the concept is deeply personal to Dizzy. The rapper asserts, “I didn’t want people to perceive me as this weed rapper with a weed album.” Instead, he admits that a key moment in creating the album came from his first encounter with his father. “I did a show in Detroit with Hopsin, and I got to meet my father for the first time. I was trying to figure out what he was gonna be like. He went to jail a couple months before I was born, and then he got out 20 years later.” To buffer the circumstances, Dizzy and his Pops eased tensions with some help. “When I finally met him, all we did was smoke and talk.” “We just got to do a lot of catchin’ up, lotta talkin’, and lotta smokin’.” After his father traveled to several dates with the Funk Volume family, Dizzy left the experience with a title and theme for his debut album.

The independent album produced two multimillion-view videos on YouTube, “Solo Dolo” and “Can’t Trust Em.” Dizzy was specific in giving his expanding base both sides of his repertoire. The first was Dizzy’s most personal record, while the second had, what he calls “that now-sound.” Both resonated, and the rapper was able to go from “doing shows to doing concerts” in his relentless touring with label-mates. Reflecting, he notes, “I was just testing the waters.” Ready to fully jump in, Wright promises of his forthcoming work, “My next album will be the biggest one to date. It’ll be the perfect material for the fans, ‘cause I understand everything a lot more.”

Like his idol, Dizzy Wright embodies a do-for-self journey that’s magnetized listeners with his natural charisma. Perhaps with a cloudy chorus or a bassline to make it digestible, he’s leading a new charge. “’Pac’s passion gives me passion. I don’t wanna be just one of these niggas just talkin’.” In life and in music, already he’s saying much more.

Emilio Rojas

During a time when New York is struggling to break new artists, an unlikely face, from an unlikely place, has emerged. Rochester, New York, native Emilio Rojas is just that: The fresh face New York needs to reclaim a place in the forefront of the Hip Hop genre. In 2005, Emilio received a phone call from a friend asking if he would like to move to New York. After selling everything he owned, he was living in Brooklyn the next day. Since then Emilio has distinguished himself by releasing several critically acclaimed mixtapes, and taken his place amongst the most anticipated of up and coming artists

Black Pegasus

Robert Houston II was born on March 24, 1980 in Germany where his father was stationed with the US Air Force, and lived in Arizona, Florida and New Mexico before his family settled on the Southeast side of Colorado Springs when he was age ten. He is from the Woodside Townhomes section in Colorado Springs. He is of mixed African-American and Mexican descent, hence the title of his fourth album, The Black Mexican. He open enrolled for high school and attended Widefield and Mitchell High School, and began rapping when he was sixteen, soon performing and working in his early days under the name Yo Mamma's Pimp. He worked with the group Fusion of Syllables (F.O.S.) for two years before going solo in 2001. Black-P has released five studio albums (Black Pegasus, Knuckle Up, F**K YO RADIO, The Black Mexican, and Black By Popular Demand), two mixtapes (Black P The Mixtape, and Shitting On the Industry Vol.1), and one collaboration CD (Banana Spitz) with Liquid Assassin of the hip hop group Grave Plott. His new album Brass Knuckle King was released in 2011, and featured guest appearances by Immortal Technique, Liquid Assassin, and Kutt Calhoun. Black P is also currently working on a collaboration album entitled "The Council", which will consists of Black P, King Tef, Hypnautic, and Johnny Rocketz. Black P's seventh studio album, "Yo Mamma's Pimp", is slated for a 2012 release as well.

His album "The Rise" released on May 12th 2015 debuted at #2 on itunes and #9 on Hip-Hop Billboard charts. He has been touring virtually non-stop over the last 3 years headlining his own tours and supporting acts with a wide variety of fanbases. His fast witty lyrics mixed with substance and relatable subject matter has gained him his own cult following called WTFGang which stands for "We're The Future". As an independent artist Futuristic takes pride in his creativity and versatility using his words to inspire his fans and let them know that anything is truly possible but also gives them music to BANG with the top down in the summer and get them in the feels when they need something to vibe too. Moving forward he expects to be exactly what he named his lead single from his album.... "The Greatest".

In the Fall of 2015 Futuristic was featured on A Great Big World single "Hold Each Other" which led him to National television performances on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, VH1 Streamy Awards, Performing for the Vice President Joe Biden & CEO of Apple Time Cook, for the HRC National Dinner in Washington D.C.

Shortly after that he released a joint album with artist/friend Devvon Terrell which sold over 30,000 copies and premiered in all categories of billboard for the first two weeks & also hit #2 on itunes Catapulting Devvons solo career & boosting an already prosperous career of his own.

In 2016 Futuristic has been hitting the internet heavy with all sorts of viral content & touring as usual. This year expect more milestones and the first worldwide tour from the constantly rising star after the release of another album yet to be named but expected to be released in August.

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