Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc

Chicago's Joan of Arc is never reliant on the status quo. In the course of their history, the band's recorded output has elicited not only critical praise through challenging the norms of traditional songwriting, but also significant backlash from reviewers who became increasingly confused by the band's eclectic output. Following an eight year stint with Delaware's Jade Tree Records, Joan of Arc made the jump to a new label and a new beginning with Polyvinyl late spring 2004.

Joan of Arc's genesis can be traced to the days of Cap'n Jazz. Cap'n Jazz was founded by brothers Tim Kinsella (vocals) and Mike Kinsella (drums), bassist Sam Zurick, and guitarist Victor Villareal while they were still in junior high or high school. In the band's last year, guitarist Davey von Bohlen joined. Although Cap'n Jazz's history was short-lived, they built a strong local following in the Chicago area and released two 7"s, several split 7"s, numerous compilation tracks, and a full-length.

Following Cap'n Jazz's July 1995 break-up, Tim Kinsella began writing experimental, abstract songs with keyboardist/guitarist Jeremy Boyle. Additionally, Tim and Sam Zurick were both learning new instruments (guitar and drums respectively) in a separate band with bassist Erik Bocek (a high school friend who had also doubled as Cap'n Jazz's roadie). Their songs paid homage to bands like The Modern Lovers and Slant 6. After some discussion, and with the addition of Mike Kinsella, the two groups became one.

Shortly after the first show, Joan of Arc recorded 1996's Method & Sentiment EP on Jade Tree. The Busy Bus, Sunny Sun EP on Southern was the band's second release and appeared in 1997. Both were 7"s. Several months after the Southern 7", the band's debut full-length, A Portable Model Of, was released on Jade Tree June 1997. The album painted post folk and post rock on top of impressionistic aural canvases. The calm instrumentation, odd sounds, and effects on the album established a template the band would continually re-examine and re-invent on successive albums. With the appearances of Azita Youssefi (Scissor Girls, Bride of No No, Azita), Ryan Rapsys (Euphone, Heroic Doses), and Davey von Bohlen (The Promise Ring, Maritime), the album established the Joan of Arc precedent of using outside collaborators to assist in fleshing out the core group's songwriting.

1998's How Memory Works LP was more realized and complete than A Portable Model Of. The album creatively displayed electronics and composition alongside bits of analog synth noise and short sound vignettes within a rock framework. By the time the album was released, Sam and Erik quit the band and were replaced by Todd Mattei (Friend/Enemy, L'Altra). The album showcased the band's ability to deconstruct and reinterpret traditional rock in addition to classical madrigals and various forms of classical structure.

Although Joan of Arc wanted to distance themselves musically from Cap'n Jazz, the past inevitably caught up to them in 1998 when Jade Tree released a 2-disc Cap'n Jazz anthology. The discography was unintentionally revisionist. What had been a group of teenage friends playing in a punk band was now being touted by zine culture as a band who had galvanized a genre. Suddenly Cap'n Jazz had "dominated the Chicago indie scene of the early nineties" and were "a band who helped transform emo from a deeply underground punk subgenre into a more widely accepted subset of indie rock." Not only were such statements false (their following had been highly regional and by no means dominant, their overall influence was most likely being distorted by the success of Davey von Bohlen's band, The Promise Ring), but Joan of Arc was now tagged with a genre buzzword that didn't fit.

Joan of Arc's reaction to the increased visibility was to become more minimalist. With 1999's Live in Chicago, 1999, the band pared themselves to a three-piece with Jeremy Boyle, Tim Kinsella, and Todd Mattei handling the songwriting reins. Contributors included Kevin J. Frank (Gauge, Radio Flyer), Mike Kinsella (American Football, Owen), Jen Wood (Jen Wood, The Postal Service), and others. The album also marked the first time the band would heavily use the studio as an instrument. Engineers Casey Rice and Elliot Dicks were invaluable in creating the sparse, warm soundscapes on the album. The album delighted hardcore Joan of Arc fans, confused critics expectations of the band, and began to cultivate the "love 'em or hate 'em" debates that began to surround the band. The record just sounded different. One of the reasons was that on the first two Joan of Arc albums, Casey recorded the rock tracks and Dicks handled the experimental songs. On Live in Chicago, 1999, the equation was reversed.

The line-up that appeared on 1999's Live in Chicago, 1999 appeared again, albeit expanded, with 2000's The Gap. The continuous decision to deconstruct and reconstruct song structures and the increased emphasis on the "studio as instrument" philosophy combined with the expanded line-up, ended up being too-many-cooks-in-the-kitchen. While fans could appreciate what the band was trying to accomplish with the studio experiments (some songs used 100 tracks), the critics threw their hands in the air. The band was earning a reputation as being highly eccentric and fucking around for fuck's sake.

In 2001, Tim returned to the studio to record vocals and guitar for a solo EP on Troubleman Unlimited. Later that year, he and Mike Kinsella teamed up with Sam Zurick and Victor Villareal and formed Owls. Despite attempts to keep the band together, Owls ended up releasing only one album. Another band Tim was involved with was Friend/Enemy. The ambitious collaboration among Chicago musicians included members of Joan of Arc, 90 Day Men, Hella, Califone, Heroic Doses , Need New Body, Ghosts and Vodka, Bride of No No, and many others. The collective concentrated on improvising accompaniment to loose song structures. It was the second time in as many years that Tim Kinsella had been reunited with founding Joan of Arc member Sam Zurick.

Spring 2004 found Joan of Arc touring with their side bands the Love of Everything and Make Believe. The tour included a stop through Champaign, IL at Nargile. The show started late and it was the night of Daylight Savings, Joan of Arc didn't finish their set until 4:00 AM. At the end of the show, Joan of Arc handed five-song demos to the Polyvinyl members who had been in attendance.

The new songs were drastically different, more composed, more refined. Joan of Arc, the band that had been creatively reinventing themselves album after album, had not only reinvented themselves but discovered a cohesive vision toward the future. The new songs were a band coming into their own. Following the tour, Joan of Arc returned to Chicago and Polyvinyl contacted them. The rest, they say, is history.

August 2004 saw the nationwide release of Joan of Arc's Polyvinyl debut, Joan of Arc, Dick Cheney, Mark Twain.... The album marked the debut of new Joan of Arc member Cale Parks (Aloha) on vibraphone and percussion and also featured members of Town And Country, Love of Everything, Make Believe, Owen, and Pit er Pat.

After 10 years as a band, momentum can surely change and Joan of Arc and Kinsella worked through this change with the release of 2008's Boo Human. A collective effort, Boo Human found Joan of Arc in studio with one-week of recording time and a sign-up sheet for contributions from 14 musicians. These musicians, with past work that has included collaborations with Wilco, Iron & Wine, Bonnie "Prince" Billy, Beth Orton and Prefuse 73, recognized the chaotic energy of a diversified recording atmosphere. Boo Human is frenetic and tense, yet entirely cohesive.

On June 9, 2009 Joan of Arc released their latest effort, Flowers. Recorded over the course of a year in four different sessions with four different line-ups, the album holds true to Joan of Arc's penchant for the unexpected.

Co La is the primary project of musician and producer Matt Papich, whose explorations of sample-based electronic music have culminated in 'Moody Coup'.

The emotional palette of 'Moody Coup', Papich's second album and first for Software Recording Co., is more complex than its exuberant predecessor 'Daydream Repeater' (NNA Tapes 2011). Where that record's relentlessly bucolic tone drew from the saccharine core of reggae, exotica, and 60s girl groups, the bedrock of Moody Coup is elusive and abstract.

The various genre coinages that have been tagged to Co La's music before – new exotica, Avant-luxury, furniture music, etc. – fail to accommodate the brainier obsessions behind Moody Coup's genesis. A new brand of alchemy occurs in the album, where cryptic sources are enhanced and embellished to a point of transcendence. This departure is the brilliant process o of Co La's unpredictable electronic music.

Highlights of Moody Coup include 'Remarkable Features', which consolidates the prior seismic scope of Daydream Repeater into a dance floor standout. 'Deaf Christian' transforms a Neil Sedaka doo-wopper into a mesmerizingly dark House cut, complete with synth chasms and haunting voice chants (supplied here and throughout the record by Angel Deradoorian). The meticulously crafted 'Suspicious' ventures into more calming pastures — an extra dimensional, dubbed-out take on the Psychic TV gem by the same name.

At the outset of Moody Coup, 'Sukiyaki (To Die For)' melodically alludes to the Kyu Sakamoto song 'Sukiyaki.' The original was penned as a mournful assessment of post-war Japan's relationship to the US, albeit dressed by Sakamoto as a love song. Ironically, 'Sukiyaki' became a hit oversees in the US and was later covered by A Taste of Honey. Rather than translating the lyrics, A Taste of Honey set new words to the original melody. (Stranger still, the word "Sukiyaki" itself refers to a Japanese hot dish.)

It's important to note that the wide range of reference sources does not serve Moody Coup as a superficial demonstration of Papich's eclectic taste. Instead, all of the micro pieces function mosaically, creating an impression at a macro level that is extremely potent as music as well as concept. Co La's intellectual obsessions are rooted in questions about how music is dilated by the cultures who created it and the power structures that shape those cultures (see "Sukiyaki"), while his musical obsessions are always rooted in the sensual, the beautiful and the immediate.

Papich describes the working Co La method on Moody Coup as "employing the hegemony of delete." He likes to be interrupted, and is fond of working in places where domestic concerns are on equal terms with studio practice. Much of Moody Coup was made in the kitchen of Papich's Baltimore home — a place where he describes having the "best interruptions." Assistant to Papich's production was friend Joe Williams, who programmed and performed all synths. Tracks were additionally consolidated from field recordings, samples and composed in Ableton Live and mixed in Brooklyn at Gary's Electric Studio, located at the Software HQ.

Buffalo Stance

Jamey Robinson's Buffalo Stance has evolved from a man with a synthesizer into a fully fleshed out rhythymic, loopy funtimes party! The shows are a ridiculously joyful musical experience. If you haven't seen them, just trust us and get your ass out for this show...

$12.00

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Johnny Brenda's

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Joan of Arc with Co La, Buffalo Stance

Wednesday, August 28 · 9:00 PM at Johnny Brenda's