Teen Daze

In 2010, Jamison, the person behind Teen Daze, had no idea what Four More Years wouldbring. That debut EP, a collection of blissful home recordings, was the work of a carefree 24 year-old. By 2012, things had changed, as they tend to do: relationships dissolved, illness affected his family, windows for outward communication were closing. The gravity of it all made
for constant output; he reached for futuristic utopia with All Of Us, Together, found a devotional sanctuary inside The Inner Mansions, and embraced hibernation on Glacier. In hindsight, this

was an artist coping through various forms of introverted escapism.

While proud of the material, Jamison sought to break this cycle when approaching the next record. He knew it would take a few leaps of faith, most directly: out of his bedroom... out of his comfort zone. For the first time, he gave up some control, inviting the input of others.

Bearing over 30 demos, Jamison joined one of his musical heroes John Vanderslice at Tiny

Telephone, his all-analog studio in San Francisco. Beyond the immediate sonic advantages of recording to tape, the sessions with Vanderslice and co-producer Simon Bridgefoot encouraged
a new positivity and confidence to his craft. The result is Morning World, eleven fully built, balanced, and expressed songs, the most vulnerable and honest Teen Daze LP to date. Thematically, Jamison paints a familiar picture: a Garden of Eden, a place of transcendent, painfree beauty, but with one key distinction... it’s not real and time there is finite. With vocals boldly up front—surrounded by strings, piano, guitar, and live percussion—he details a realm that, for the first time, has room for more than one.

“Where does life go when it’s done,” he poses in the closing moments of “Post Storm”, before lending an answer that evokes the omnipresent wisdom of All Things Must Pass: “a moon replaces morning sun.

Drop Electric (Record Release Party!)

Based in a city known for stagnation and business as usual, Washington DC’s Drop Electric exists to break the mold. Drop Electric’s music is a manic barrage of soaring female vocals, distortion, tribal percussion, and electronic bleeps, controlled by structured, dynamic songwriting. Ramtin Arablouei, Neel Singh, Sho Fujiwara and Kristna Reznikov’s shared experiences as children of immigrant families contribute to an air of vague unfamiliarity in their music.

“Our songs have always come from a collection of accidents. It is a few people in a room playing instruments until something sounds good. So we decided to do what we always did. Don’t think. Just write,” explains the band’s dummer Ramtin Arablouei.

“Ideas usually come to me from a dark place. Many times the words are responding to the pressure of having to write an album worthy of lyrics and melodies, “muses Reznikov.

In 2013, the four members of Drop Electric sat down to record songs that would eventually become Waking Up to the Fire. The result is a bass heavy, electronic collection of songs. Like past Drop Electric releases, the songs on Waking Up to the Fire have a cinematic quality while Reznikov’s voice and lyrics convey a sense of desperation in an increasingly disconnected world.

$10.00 - $12.00

Tickets Available at the Door

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