When the Growlers put out their "Greatest sHits" compilation and their subsequent "Couples Vol 1-8" series there was no doubt the writing team of Brooks Nielsen and Matt Taylor and their band of merry menacers could output as many songs about the Growler life as they wanted to.The question would be what of that output to put out.

Now, with several moon cycles and a couple hundred tunes behind them, The Growlers are set to release their latest batch of sonic brownies, "Hung at Heart", January 22 via Everloving Records, and yes their goodies are still laced with that psychedelic circus of surf, sex, and hobo trance, boom boom twang that makes for a hell of a high!

However, getting these treats out of the oven wasn't all that easy. Indie Iron Chef, Dan Auerbach, had initially tried his hand in the kitchen but when the dish ended up overcooked, the Growlers brought it back to the home kitchen, drank the juice and started over.

Warning to the hipster savants: This is a Growlers record. Fuzzy genius and working class logic mix easily in love songs that extol the virtues of the free market in mate selection (One Million Lovers). "Some Day" opens up the Hope and Magic aisle in the sentimental supermarket where Nielsen sings about turning 'bologna into steak and tallboys into champagne.' The real magic however, has been the relentless pursuit of happiness on the road while traveling throughout the hundreds of gigs performed to get from Costa Mesa to London to Brazil and back. At every stop along the way the kids and creeps have joined the Beach Goth caravan that is the Growlers experience. It is the experience they have coined that has landed them on the big stages of Coachella (where their set began at 4:20) and Lollapalooza 2012 and though nothing in life is certain, one thing will always remain true: The Growlers will continue to live a simple blend of surfing and experimentation, both in music and road dog life.

"Their raucous set was like if the Velvet Underground had turned to the MC5 at their Boston Tea Party concert in 1968 and, instead of insulting them, had turned and made love to them—and that was how Lou Reed wound up wearing that dog collar. I couldn't make out a single lyric, but did they really close the set with 'Little Honda?'" --LA RECORD

"Swirling, distorted psych, bulldozed along by pounding primitive drums, fuzzed out vocals, all glued together with a heavy spaced out guitar drone. If that ain't the ingredients for record of the month my name is Prince Bloody William. Imagine if you will the best of THEE OH SEES jamming deep with MOON DUO, with the aid of some sort of retro type drug that only Brace Belden knows the name of and you would almost be right on the money. Heavy, without losing one single hook, repetitive without being the least bit boring and shamelessly stepped in the glory years of acid rock without being a boring regurgitating hipster. Be warned, this record will give you a contact high." --Maximum Rock N Roll #337

Gap Dream

From glam to gunk this Ohio trippy man can be found making his home recordings that range from Peter Koppes to Slade. Or just at home resting with his pretty little pup Judy. Nothing stands in Gabriel Fulvimar's way.

Together PANGEA

From Los Angeles by-way-of Newhall, Pangea play poppy, snotty, shitty, fitty, punky, stunky garage-pop and roll. est. 2005

For most, a brush with death would be cause for retreat, reflection, and reluctance, but Seattle band La Luz found something different in it: resilience. Having survived a high-speed highway collision shortly after releasing their 2013 debut LP It’s Alive, La Luz, despite lasting trauma, returned to touring with a frequency and tirelessness that put their peers to shame. Over the past year-and-a-half of performing, the band arrived at a greater awareness of their music’s ability to whip eager crowds into a frenzy. In response, frontwoman Shana Cleveland’s guitar solos took on a more unhinged quality. The basslines (from newly-installed member Lena Simon) became more lithe and elastic. Stage-dives and crowd-surfing grew to be as indelible a part of the La Luz live experience as their onstage doo-wop-indebted dance moves.

When it came time to record Weirdo Shrine, their second album—due out August 7th—the goal was to capture the band’s restless live energy and commit it to tape. In early 2015, Cleveland and Co. adjourned to a surf shop in San Dimas, California where, with the help of producer/engineer Ty Segall, they realized this vision. Tracking most of the album live in shared quarters, La Luz chose to leave in any happy accidents and spur-of-the-moment flourishes that occurred while recording. Cleveland’s newly fuzzed-up guitar solos—which now incorporated the influence of Japanese Eleki players in addition to the twang of American surf and country—were juxtaposed against the group’s most angelic four-part harmonies to date. The organs of Alice Sandahl and the drumming of Marian Li Pino were granted extra heft and dimension. Thematically, Cleveland channeled Washingtonian poet Richard Brautigan on “You Disappear” and “Oranges,” and sought inspiration from Charles Burns’ Seattle-set graphic novel Black Hole.

The resulting album is a natural evolution of the band’s self-styled “surf noir” sound—a rawer, turbo-charged sequel that charts themes of loneliness, infatuation, obsession and death across eleven tracks, from the opening credits siren song of “Sleep Till They Die” to the widescreen, receding-skyline send-off of “Oranges” and its bittersweet epilogue, “True Love Knows.”

four freebirds high on life/doing the things we wanna do/we'll get as high as we fucking please/fuck it.

Colleen Green

Inspired by the honesty of contemporaries like Mike Hunchback, the DIY aesthetic of early Thermals and Nobunny albums, and all the poppiest melodies of her favorite singles, stoned songwriter Colleen Green creates the original pop soundtrack to all the days you spend in a daze.

Green's strength is in application and in doing so she builds a familiar sound; at the same time it's unlike anything you've heard before. Her songs run the gamut in musical styles, from Ramones rip-off pop punk to dreamy stoned drone to getting-ready-for-da-club-shit.
I know a couple of things about Colleen Green.

One thing that's for sure: she's a songwriting phenomenon. She sings lovely, catchy, fuzzy songs that range from 80s pop goulash to psychedelic drone; from 90s power punk to homemade Sebadoh-style songs of heartache. Think of her as a sort of female Daniel Johnston, with her at home making comics, armed with a seemingly unlimited amount of well-composed songs, her lamentations on out-of-reach love, her self-medication, her bedroom recordings. She proudly displays her musical heroes' influences on her sleeve. She plays live shows alone on stage with only an electric guitar and a drum machine to accompany her.

Is she a genius? Who knows.

So let's get down to the bare bone facts. These are the things I know about Colleen Green to be true: Colleen Green sprouted up some years ago in Massachusetts, deep within the forests of the Merrimack Valley. She was raised by a loving family that brought her up on a steady diet of delicious oldies and sugary cereals. Colleen Green went to school, learned how to speak the language of the streets, and by second grade was rapping on school grounds. By the age of 11 she had discovered punk rock and never looked back. From that point on she was obsessed with music.

Green moved to Oakland, California in 2008 in search of hot sun, good bud, good buds, and nice boys. Fortunately, five of her best friends decided to join her, the best of which being Kayla. Along with their friend Steve O, Green and Kayla created the Full House House in West Oakland and invited countless great bands from across the nation and world to play in their living room. Kayla can be seen on the front cover of the "Green One" 7", and is also one of two main characters in Green's comic strip, "Real Shit Daily".

Recently, Green retreated to a cave in Los Angeles, where she can now be found sleeping, smoking, baking magical treats, and staring at the wall. Within two lonely months, Colleen had written and recorded Milo Goes to Compton; within five she had released both that tape and the 4 Loko 2 Kayla CD-R EP as well. Both of these albums have been in heavy rotation since the day they arrived in my mailbox.

Anyway, that is just the beginning of the Colleen Green story. If you can, get to know her. And text her. You will love her
"A brutal gem for the real indie club bound to blow up speakers and inspire many bands out there to get way more creative (or violent) with their re-appropriation of 1960s Girls in the Garage tropes." --20 Jazz Funk Greats

"Like coffee for your ears." --Pitchfork

"Slightly snotty but totally cool fuzz pop music." --Neu Magazine

$15.00 - $18.00


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