Weekend, Disappears

1997—2009
Shaun Durkan (vocalist/bassist/guitarist) and Kevin Johnson (guitarist) first met and joined creative forces when they were just 12 years old, as bassists in the middle school band. Durkan's father, the singer in post-punk band Half Church, had exposed Shaun to venerable likes of Killing Joke and the Cure (evidence that both are heavy influences on this forthcoming release.)
Years later, Durkan and Johnson attended the San Francisco Art Institute, where drummer Abe Pedroza was Durkan's roommate. Known within their inner circles for having a near-machine-like drumming ability and love for all primarily obscure bands, Pedroza was quickly enlisted into what would become Weekend (serving as the band's second drummer, replacing Taylor Valentino who departed the band following the recording of the band's debut album, Sports)
2009—2011
Weekend officially formed in 2009 and recorded the Sports LP throughout the year at Ruminator Audio, which belongs to long-time friend and producer/engineer Monte Vallier (formerly of Jet Black Crayon, Swell, and Half Church- with Durkan's father). "When we wrote Sports it was an explosion of energy and ideas," Johnson says. "We'd been talking about doing the band for 10 years, so when we finally got together it was a cathartic release of energy and songs."
Throughout the next two years, the band found itself touring internationally with the Kills (Europe) and Wire (UK and US) and in Japan in support of the 2011's "Red" EP, which marked a sonic departure from the band's initial signature addiction to noise over clarity. "Red" (which was also produced by Monte Vallier) saw the band embrace sweeter melodies that encouraged Shaun to display his vocal abilities free from any distortion overlap.
2012—Present
The band spent most of 2012 writing, recording, and painstakingly mixing the 10 songs that comprise the album once again with Monte Vallier at Ruminator. As Monte was in Half Church and a close family friend of Shaun's, he had long ago offered his recording services since the very beginnings of the band. Despite the all-too-familiar time lapse of the recording and mixing process Durkan recounts the Jinx sessions as "the most trying though rewarding experience so far."
During this time, Weekend relocated cross-country to the already heavily saturated Brooklyn music scene. The trio had collectively grown weary of the trappings of home. Durkan states, "Feeling at home is evidence of stagnation and so I'm happy to say New York still feels alien to me." Despite the drastic change of scenery, he maintains "Geographically-based music scenes are for the most part defunct due to the internet but I don't think we'll ever be part of any scene. We stand on our own."
When asked to describe the album in 3 adjectives, Durkan stated, "Volatile. Cathartic. Bittersweet. The record is a collage of inspiration and ideas from each member of the band. Shards of experiences, images, smells, sounds molded into something we can collectively call ours." The album visually represents the music as well, through personal possessions of each band member that "had singular and emotional connections to and democratize it through a physical process. Painting the objects black adds a new, collective ownership over the previous personal meaning. [There is] the coalescence of our individual art to make something new, stark, and powerful." That Stark black visual sheen is compliments the songs that embody Jinx. Memories and experiences have been reinterpreted and recalled into existence from haunting, beautiful places. Each song on the album charges through a polarizing emotion through an ebb and flow of sounds both ominous and soothing. Lastly, the LP's presumably superstitious title compliments this body of work thematically. Shaun recalls his father nicknaming him "Jinx" as a boy. That name, like all the inspirations, emotions and experiences has returned to haunt the band - this time delivered with a lustrous and magnificent black sheen.

Traditionally a band bio is a way for people to get in tune with your history, see where you're currently at in your career, get the origin story, etc - but it's completely inconsequential for a working artist. For people who've spent years trying to survive making music, doing something you feel is important can be suffocating - and summing up that struggle in broad strokes is tedious.
What makes people respond to something? Is it honesty? Anyone can be true, say what makes sense to them - talk about how they feel. It's especially tricky to answer this question in a world where it's never been easier to be heard, but never been harder to get anyone to listen. Is it ridiculous to think you can connect with anyone when more people are using a computer to know their community than the actual community around them?
It can be confusing doing something when it's all you know. It means you are constantly sacrificing, whatever it is, to try and get someone to see things your way. It's personal and it's a message not everyone will receive. It's like being a Goth or a Smiths fan (of which I am both).
Friends are disintegrating, patterns are becoming habits and everyday you wake up the world you know is different. Still, we make ways to relate with people, we search out meaning and make sense of our surroundings. And somehow, four adults can coordinate two practices a week to try and make sense of it together.
Disappears have been a band since 2008.
Disappears are aged 36 and up.
Disappears have had three drummers, one of them well known.
Disappears focus the energy of post-punk into the repetition of dub and minimalism.
Disappears have some members who were in bands you may recognize or own records by.
Disappears artwork all looks the same.
Disappears are on Kranky Records.

Nothing

Nothing are a four piece punk band from Philadelphia, PA.

In a short time they have compiled multiple tours of the United States. They have performed in Austin, TX SXSW Music Festival of 2013 and supported bands such as The Raveonettes, METZ, Cold Cave, Merchandise, DIIV, and Youth Lagoon. Nothing are to embark on a second full United States tour in August supporting the bay area shoegaze outfit, Whirr. Whirr and Nothing will also be playing Japan and Australia in the Fall.

They have released a three song EP on Japanese boutique label, Big Love Records called, "Suns And Lovers" and earlier this year a five song EP on Baltimore Punk label, A389 Records called, "Downward Years To Come". Downward Years To Come received great press and the title tracks video was premeired on Stereogum.

$10.00 - $12.00

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All shows are 21+ Proper I.D. required for admission

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Johnny Brenda's

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Weekend, Disappears with Nothing

Sunday, October 20 · Doors 8:00 PM / Show 9:15 PM at Johnny Brenda's