The Polyphonic Spree

The Polyphonic Spree have released a new single, "What Would You Do?" The new song is the third new release from the Spree on their own Good Records Recordings label in as many months.

As with all Good Records Recordings releases, "What Would You Do?" will be available digitally in both MP3 and FLAC lossless formats, as well as a regular black 7" vinyl release and a limited-edition colored 7" vinyl release that includes a signed and numbered silkscreened print/cover by GRR house artist Nevada Hill. The vinyl releases will include a surprise B-side from the Spree, not available elsewhere. All formats are available from http://www.goodrecordsrecordings.com/

The Polyphonic Spree will kick off their first tour since 2007 in Tulsa on Feb 6. An initial run through the Southeast continues through Feb 16; West Coast and East Coast dates are coming later in the spring. See below for a list of confirmed dates. GRR label mate New Fumes will support all dates. The Spree will return to their iconic white robes for the tour, with the addition of a red heart, tied to the tour's "You + Me" theme.

Harper Simon

"I see the character in the song 'Division Street' as being at a moment where life can go a couple different ways," says Harper Simon of the title track from his narrative-driven new album. "I think these songs tend to be like a snapshot of a character at a pivotal moment. They could go this way or that way on the metaphorical Division Street: up or down, negative or positive, to the light or to self-destruction.



"Or—like in the song '99'— they're looking back at a moment they didn't recognize as pivotal," he says. "Because we rarely do."

A departure from his self-titled first record, Division Street features a sound that's much more driven by electric guitars than his alt country-flavored debut. "The mission was to make the kind of Rock 'n' Roll record I would want to listen to myself," he says. "Which sounds simple but is, in fact, incredibly difficult."


Simon co-produced Division Street with Tom Rothrock, who produced three albums for Elliott Smith (Either/Or, XO and Figure 8) and Beck's first album Mellow Gold, among others. As the team worked, the album's sound grew rougher around the edges. "I felt challenged and inspired by the idea of making a modern psychedelic folk-rock album, a Tom Rothrock production like XO, but then the Velvet Underground and the Stones kept entering in," says Simon. "Elliott Smith was very influenced by the Beatles but my guitar playing is more influenced by Keith Richards. And I kept wanting to emphasize more lo-fi elements."


The striking characters that appear in the LP's songs are sometimes amalgamations of people Simon has known, and at other times they're fictitious—but they're all at a moment of personal watershed. Asked about the track "Eternal Questions," Simon says, "Originally I was imagining this character, this guy who is bolting from rehab. And he's in a car heading back to town. Heading back to get loaded. Because there's something about that moment that is such a crazy energy I thought it would be interesting for a song. And I thought about him wondering who he was gonna call, what girl's house he may crash at. What dealer he would call. Knowing he was fucking up but being beyond turning back."

Simon's first record featured a whole coterie of collaborators and many of its songs were co-written. The new album, however, features Simon himself more prominently, and is personally riskier for that reason. "I wrote all the music and all the lyrics, and it's a guitar-driven record and the guitar is played by me. It's mostly the sound of me and Pete [drummer Pete Thomas, of Elvis Costello and the Attractions] putting it down live, the two of us. Then other players, great ones, came later and overdubbed."


"Maybe I had a lack of confidence on the first record, so I wanted the involvement of more established writers to set the bar high," says Simon. "This time, I felt I should carry it all myself."



Division Street took 18 months to write and record, and finishing it presented some personal challenges. "In the middle of recording, I thought I'd take a few weeks off to work on lyrics, but it turned into three months," says Simon. "It was a very difficult time. I was suffering from deep depression and I was creeping myself out constantly. I had to go on medication eventually, which helped some. It took me three months to finally return to the studio, but by that time I had most of the lyrics."



The album was difficult to complete, yes, but that makes some sense: as a listener, Simon is attracted to singer-songwriters whose difficult processes are evident in their work. "I like when a songwriter really goes down the rabbit hole and digs deep to come up with something powerful," he says. "I tend to be drawn to artists with real problems—misfits and wounded animals."



Division Street features lots of guest musicians—including Nikolai Fraiture from the Strokes on bass, vocals by Inara George, Feist's musical director Brian LeBarton playing synths, as well as Nate Walcott from Bright Eyes and Wilco's Mikael Jorgensen. Later, Benmont Tench (of the Heartbreakers) and celebrated LA-based record producer and composer Jon Brion joined a recording session. "I'm very lucky," says Simon. "Everybody that we asked to come and guest on the record showed up."



Drummer Pete Thomas was deeply involved in the album's construction, from its earliest sessions. "I had the perfect drummer for the job in Pete Thomas," says Simon. "I'd grown up listening to his work with Elvis Costello. Pete is very unique, I think—he has the sophistication of a first-rate session drummer, if needed, but he also has an understanding of primitive, punk drumming. And even this description of him does not do justice to his musicality."



"I admit to having gotten a late start," says Simon, who hopes to follow up Division Street with two more albums in quick succession. "Most people do their Rock 'n' Roll stuff from 25 to 35; I'm going to do it from 35 to 45. For some reason, that's my weird fate."



Simon's tastes are eclectic, which might explain why this album has such a different sound from his first. "As a guitar player, I'm just as comfortable playing honky tonk or fingerpicking folk-y stuff as I am playing a Ramones riff or a Ron Asheton style solo," he says. "I like Little Richard, the Kinks, Big Star, Hank Williams and the Pixies and Television and Muddy Waters and T Rex. I like the Who and I like X. I like it all."

Friends and Family

"It's honest, sad, and epic but without being big or bombastic..." - Charles Mudede, The Stranger

"Like Johnny Rotten meets The Band!" - Malcolm Guite, Cambridge Scholar

"Quirky indie pop from an eight-piece band that aims for a New Pornographers or Broken Social Scene sort of thing, only goofier and with more elaborate costumes." - SW Reverb

"Friends and Family are from another Seattle, a Seattle where people read books, make jokes, and sometimes sweat from doing things other than bicycling." - Bart Cameron, Ball of Wax Audio Quarterly

"As if the weird members from eight different bands ended up in the same band." - Clinton Ring

"Really, Friends and Family is the only 9 piece band I've ever seen where I thought every part was necessary, complimentary, and lovely." - Nouela

$18.00 - $20.00

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The Polyphonic Spree with Harper Simon, Friends and Family

Saturday, August 17 · Doors 8:00 PM / Show 9:00 PM at Wonder Ballroom