Riot Fest Toronto - WEEKEND PASS

A Day To Remember

Rising from the punk rock hotbed of Florida in 2003, Josh Woodard (bass), Alex Shellnutt (drums), Neil Westfall (guitar), Jeremy McKinnon (vocals) and Tom Denney (guitar) formed A DAY TO REMEMBER, crafting a blend of the music they loved into a niche of their own. Their debut on Indianola records sold 8,000 copies with little promotion, and attracted the attention of Victory Records, who signed them in 2006. "When we first got signed, our goal wasn't to blow up or even sell a ton of records," recalls bassist Josh Woodward. "All we wanted to do was stay on tour, and play to as many kids as possible." The result exceeded even their expectations, as the infectious, explosive energy of their live shows helped them organically grow a fanbase that multiplied each time they played.
With the release of their breakthrough album For Those Who Have Heart, A DAY TO REMEMBER went global. In the two short years after its release in early 2007, the band grew from a small band with a dedicated local fan-base into a worldwide phenomenon, gaining the respect and adoration from their peers as much as their fans. This is no overnight success – the band has worked hard to win over every fan they make. But the 'perfect storm' of their dedication, rapidly-spreading buzz and undeniable musical abilities have made this young band one of the most talked about bands in rock, gaining themselves a coveted slot in Alternative Press' Most Anticipated Albums 2009 issue.
Their new album Homesick sees them using their ascension as a springboard, ready to launch them into the big time. "Homesick is a culmination of 2 1/2 years of being gone on the road," Woodard notes. "It represents what we've been through, what's ahead of us,and the lessons we've learned in between. It's the heaviest and catchiest record we've ever written, and we couldn't be more excited for people to hear it. We're all so proud of what we just made, and think it really sets us up to jump to that next level." In an industry where you have to evolve to stay ahead, A DAY TO REMEMBER is standing defiant, leading the genre-straddling pack in a battle cry, ready for the fight of their lives. Grab your friends, "disrespect your surroundings", and watch A DAY TO REMEMBER set the world alight. The mainstream won't know what hit it.

Pierce The Veil

A lot has happened in the three years since Pierce The Veil released their debut A Flair For The Dramatic in 2007. The band have toured the world including Warped Tour in 2008 and Taste Of Chaos in 2009; converted countless fans to their unique brand of progressive post-hardcore; and, most notably, grown as both people and musicians from these cumulative experiences. All of this figures into the group's long-awaited sophomore release Selfish Machines, an album that sees the band-frontman Vic Fuentes, drummer Mike Fuentes, guitarist Tony Perry and bassist Jaime Preciado-coming together to craft an inventive album that is certain to challenge people's perception of the band.

Recorded with Mike Green (Paramore, Set Your Goals) in Los Angeles, the album ended up being more involved than initially planned-but that ended up being a blessing in disguise. "It was actually a pretty intense process," Vic explains, adding that the band didn't finish the album in the time allotted which forced him to stay in LA for an extra two months working on vocals and bouncing between recording studios working on new ideas. "It was definitely necessary to take the extra time with this recording," he continues. "We're not settling on anything with this record."

From the soaring pop sensibility of songs like "Bulletproof Love" to the upbeat aggression of "Caraphernelia", the album shows how versatile Pierce The Veil have become, whether they're screaming their hearts out or gently bearing their souls. There are also plenty of sonic surprises on Selfish Machines, most notably the emotive, piano-driven ballad "Stay Away From My Friends" which displays the band's growth as songwriters. "That song was my first crack at writing on piano," Vic explains. "I've got a piano in my house now so I'd been messing around on it and ended up writing some riffs, which I think definitely gave the album a different feel," he continues, adding that he hopes to eventually implement keyboards into the band's live performances.

Although Pierce The Veil have toured incessantly for the past three years, they made some time late last year to write these tracks and instantly threw themselves into the songwriting process. "It's pretty hard for us to write on the road because we're touring in an RV most of the time with tight quarters, which doesn't bode well for creativity," Vic acknowledges with a laugh. "We have a studio at home that I like to hang out in, so I basically just shut myself out from the world for three or four months and spent all day and night writing," he continues. "Every song is super personal; they're all very real about our lives and I think once people read them they can probably see a little bit about what's going on with us."

"We are all in one way or another selfish machines," Vic explains when asked about the album's title. "In no way is this a negative thing, it's human nature. We all have natural tendencies to want, love, and take. When it comes down to it, humans have animal like qualities that we keep inside and even try to deny-but no matter how morally good someone may think they are or try to be, we are still humans," he continues. "One example of this is how we are all constantly searching for someone to love, or even more desperately, someone to love you. It is human nature broken down to its bare bones, no bullshit, just rock bottom honest feelings and desire. No trying to be nice, shy, or respectable, it's about the 'evil' thing inside of us that is really not evil at all, it's just there and always will be inside of us all."

Having played with bands in nearly every subgenre, Pierce The Veil have always prided themselves on not confining their band to one particular scene or genre-and the harmony-rich songs like "I Don't Care If You're Contagious" are guaranteed to expose them to entirely new crowds of followers with Selfish Machines. "Every band that I've ever loved and admired has constantly grown and each record is a little different in their own way and I think that's how it should be because it keeps you setting new goals and trying to change for the better," Vic explains. "This record is definitely going to take us new places and after this we'll keep writing and try to make the next one even better," he summarizes. "We're always looking ahead."

The Weakerthans

The Weakerthans recorded their fourth album, Reunion Tour, in March 2007, in a recording studio built above a factory on the outskirts of Winnipeg, the cold prairie city where the band was born 10 years ago.

The factory produces cases for machines and computers and musical instruments, but only in the daytime; for a week and a half in the middle of winter, after the casemakers departed each afternoon at 4:30, the musicmakers, led by producer Ian Blurton, would arrive and play all night, crafting new sounds and new songs on the factory floor and then driving back to the city through the frigid Manitoba pre-dawn.

The result is lush and energetic, infectious, unforgettable—hours after listening to it you may be surprised to find that you still have one of the songs stuck in your head, and what's more, it's a song about curling. Yes, curling: that noble sport of sweeping and sliding that in the snowier precincts of North America is more like a religion than a sport. (Winnipeg, a city of just 600,000 people, has 21 curling clubs.)

"Tournament of Hearts," the curling song, is a perfect example of what John K. Samson, the band's lead singer and lyricist, calls "first-person fiction," and there's a lot of that on Reunion Tour.

Like Bruce Springsteen's "Nebraska" or Tom Waits's "Bone Machine," the album is a collection of finely rendered portraits of fictional characters, none of whom you probably know but all of whom you'll recognize. There's the dot-com millionaire on his way down in "Relative Surplus Value," the Winnipeg bus driver of "Civil Twilight" whose assigned route takes him every two hours past a house that is haunted only for him. And there are real-life characters, too: "Bigfoot!" tells the story of a ferry operator in northern Manitoba who saw the legendary creature and was then taken advantage of and mocked by everyone from cable news networks to the citizens of his own small town. In "Hymn of the Medical Oddity," we meet Winnipegger David Reimer, who was born a boy but raised as a girl after a famous and tragic medical experiment.

Many of the themes and images of previous Weakerthans albums are here, from missed communications to abandoned buildings to the geography of Winnipeg. (Virtute the cat, the narrator of one of the more memorable songs from the band's last record, returns, too.) But there are new connections as well: the majority of the

songs are about men, some sympathetic, some despicable. Two of the songs, "Sun in an Empty Room" and "Night Windows," are inspired by specific Edward Hopper paintings. And, more elusively but not less significantly, this is a record made during wartime, and images of combat and struggle lurk on many tracks.

The Weakerthans have long been known for their lyrical ingenuity, but they are, after all, a rock band, and Reunion Tour is a musical triumph. Stephen Carroll, who, like Samson, lives in Winnipeg, plays guitar, pedal steel and keyboards. Greg Smith, the newest member of the band, plays bass and keyboards. He lives in Toronto, as does Jason Tait, who plays drums and percussion, as well as keyboards, banjo, vibes and glockenspiel.

Reunion Tour is not itself a reunion—The Weakerthans have never gone away—but it is a giant step forward for the band. There's a new confidence and comfort here, four musicians more sure than ever of who they are and what they want to say.

Every Time I Die

Every Time I Die have never been an easy act to categorize and that's one of the key reasons why the band's fans have never turned their back on this innovative act's unique brand of music. While the band started out in the late '90s hardcore scene, over the past decade they've continued to evolve and push the boundaries of heavy music, a process that's culminating with their sixth full-length Ex Lives. Recorded by Joe Barresi (Tool, Queens Of The Stone Age) Ex Lives sees the band—vocalist Keith Buckley, guitarists Jordan Buckley and Andy Williams, drummer Ryan Leger—coming together to create the most forward-thinking album of their career.

"Everything about this record was new," Keith explains. "Normally I'm in a comfort zone when I write lyrics because I'm just holed up in my apartment but this time I was finding little corners of clubs in Europe with [side-project] the Damned Things trying to squeeze in a couple of hours of writing and I think that process really affected the way this album came together."


Keith adds that although Every Time I Die's party vibe has been well-documented in the past, Ex Lives saw the band approaching the album from a more serious perspective. "There's no song like 'We'rewolf' on this album," Keith explains. "I was pretty angry when we were writing these songs which isn't a good spot for a human being but is good if you're a guy singing in a band," he continues with a laugh. "I was just really angry and disappointed with a lot of things in my life at the time and I think that definitely comes through on a lot of these songs; I was wondering if it was all karma because I was a horrible person in a past life and that's where the album title came from."


From the syncopated chaos of the opening salvo "Underwater Bimbos From Outer Space" to the progressive mosh anthem "A Wild, Shameless Plain" and relentless metal riffage of "The Low Road Has No Exits," Ex Lives sees Every Time I Die further tempering their aggression while also implementing new instrumentation such as banjo (see the sinister intro of "Partying Is Such Sweet Sorrow") and, yes, flute (see the end of "Indian Giver") in order to recontextualize exactly what it means to be a heavy band, which is something that has endeared them to fans for thirteen years.


"I don't think us doing anything different is a surprise to Every Time I Die fans because one of the main reasons why a lot of people have stuck by us for so long is because they know they can expect the unexpected with each release," Keith explains, adding that if you listen close enough you'll take note of plenty of sonic subtleties on Ex Lives. "There are a lot of little weird things that I think people will start noticing more as they listen to the album," he elaborates. "I'd never added any keyboard or synthesizer elements to an Every Time I Die song before so it was a really cool opportunity to expand the sound on this disc."


Similarly Ex Lives also sees Keith pushing his limits on songs like "I Suck (Blood)," which proves how versatile the band's vocalist has become whether he's cathartically screaming or crooning an upper register melody. "On albums like [2007's] The Big Dirty no one heard my vocals until the album was totally done but on this one everyone had their input on what I was doing vocally and they could give me suggestions to improve them," Keith says, adding that this disc was more collaborative for the band. "I think I was also more energetic because I was nervous to sing in front of everyone."


It's impossible to deny that in an increasingly stagnant musical climate Every Time I Die are still pushing the limits of their own sound—and Ex Lives is aural evidence that after over a decade together they're anything but complacent. "I had to prove myself 100 percent from the beginning like I did when we put out our first record to show the other guys in Every Time I Die as well as myself that I could do this and I couldn't be happier with the end result," Keith summarizes when asked to describe Ex Lives. "This feels like a new band in a way… it's just its own thing and that feels really, really good."

There is nothing quite like a Dinosaur Jr. album. The best ones are always recognizable from the first notes. And even though J tries to trip us up by smearing "Don't Pretend You Didn't Know" with keyboards, it's clear from the moment he starts his vocals that this is the one and only Dinosaur Jr., long reigning kings of Amherst, Massachusetts (and anywhere else they choose to hang their toques).
I Bet on Sky is the third Dinosaur Jr. album since the original trio – J Mascis, Lou Barlow and Murph – reformed in 2005. And, crazily, it marks the band's 10th studio album since their debut on Homestead Records in 1985. Back in the '80s, if anyone has suggested that these guys would be performing and recording at such a high level 27 years later, they would have been laughed out of the tree fort. The trio's early shows were so full of sonic chaos, such a weird blend of aggression and catatonia that we all assumed they would flame out fast. But the joke was on us.
The trio has taken everything they've learned from the various projects they tackled over the years, and poured it directly into their current mix. J's guitar approaches some of its most unhinged playing here, but there's a sense of instrumental control that matches the sweet murk of his vocals (not that he always remembers to exercise control on stage, but that's another milieu). This is head- bobbing riff-romance at the apex. Lou's basswork shows a lot more melodicism now as well, although his two songs on I Bet on Sky retain the jagged rhythmic edge that has so often marked his work. And Murph...well, he still pounds the drums as hard
and as strong as a pro wrestler, with deceptively simple structures that manage to interweave themselves perfectly with his bandmates' melodic explosions.
After submerging myself in I Bet on Sky, it's clear that the album is a true and worthy addition to the Dinosaur Jr. discography. It hews close enough to rock formalism to please the squares. Yet it is brilliantly imprinted with the trio's magical equation, which is a gift to the rest of us. For a combo that began as anomalous fusion of hardcore punk and pop influences, Dinosaur Jr. have proven themselves to be unlikely masters of the long game. Their new album is a triumph of both form and function. And it augurs well for their future trajectory. If I were prone to wagering, I'd say their best days are yet ahead of them. And yeah. I would bet the sky on it. --Byron Coley

It doesn't happen very often, but every once in a while a band comes along who have crafted a sound that's so unique it's hard to believe they haven't been playing together for decades. For the past four years, the members of Tallahassee, Florida's Mayday Parade—vocalist/keyboardist Derek Sanders, bassist Jeremy Lezno, guitarists Alex Garcia and Brooks Betts and drummer Jake Bundrick—have been perfecting their unique brand of pop-inflected punk rock, a process that is currently culminating with the release of their major-label debut Anywhere But Here. "We really just wanted to follow our own path on this record and not worry about if we fit in anywhere," Bundrick explains. "We were striving to make a record that meshed together really well and that was actually an album in the sense that all the songs sound different, but are working together toward a common theme."
Correspondingly Anywhere But Here shows how versatile Mayday Parade are, a fact that has endeared the band to fans all over the world and helped them forge their own niche in the rock community. From soaring and instantly accessible anthems like "Anywhere But Here" and "Get Up" to heartfelt ballads such as "Save Your Heart" and melodic midtempo tracks like "Bruised and Scarred," Anywhere But Here shows how much the band have grown since their 2006 debut A Lesson In Romantics and also proves that when it comes to Mayday Parade, songwriting takes precedence over gimmicks or fleeting fashions.

Rocket from the Crypt

Pledging to never play a venue with a stage, singer/guitarist John Reis formed San Diego's Rocket From the Crypt in the summer of 1990 after becoming disillusioned with the hardcore punk band he was in called Pitchfork. Joining with then-current Rocketeers bassist Petey X and guitarist ND, in addition to departed drummer Sean and backing vocalist Elaina, Reis and company released Paint As a Fragrance in 1991.

Though the album caused a lot of people to take notice, a lineup change ensued; Atom became the drummer, and Apollo 9, a drinking buddy of Reis' who played sax in high school, joined as saxophonist. After the successful independent Circa: Now! was released on Cargo Records in 1992, a major-label bidding war resulted in Rocket From The Crypt signing with Interscope Records (in addition to Reis' other band, Drive Like Jehu, which features another former Pitchfork member, Rick Fork). Interscope then re-released Circa: Now! in 1993, and the single "Ditch Digger" spent some time in MTV's Buzz Bin. Eventually, a sixth member -- JC 2000 on horn -- was added in 1994, which preceded the release of a new 10" record, The State of Art Is on Fire, in 1995. By the end of the year, the group released its most-acclaimed album to date, Scream, Dracula, Scream. RFTC followed in 1998, and Group Sounds was issued on Vagrant in early 2001. Rocket From the Crypt was a rock & roll machine throughout the early 2000's. Their garage punk style was as fresh as those following the punk revival trend. In 2002, Rocket From the Crypt emerged with the raucous, rowdy sounds of Live From Camp X-Ray. ~ Matt Carlson, All Music Guide

The Only Place is Best Coast's follow-up to their 2010's acclaimed album Crazy For You, and it finds the proudly Southern Californian duo of Bethany Cosentino and Bobb Bruno maturing in both their sound and perspective. While Crazy For You was a nostalgic tribute to teenage feelings, The Only Place finds front woman Cosentino starting a transition into adulthood. "I'm trying really hard to grow up," she says. "I'm trying to let go of my bad habits and the immature things I still drag around with me."

Of course this adjusting comes with uncertainty and self-doubt, two feelings at the emotional center of the album. The Only Place also celebrates Los Angeles, the one place where Cosentino believes she can be the woman she wants to be. Taken all together, it evocatively captures a turbulent era in one person's life. "This record was therapeutic for me to write," Cosentino says. "But a lot of the issues I was facing will be relatable to anybody."

As with all of Best Coast's previous recordings, on The Only Place Cosentino handles all songwriting, lyrics, vocals and rhythm guitar, while multi-instrumentalist Bobb Bruno plays lead guitar, bass and drums. What's new this time is their decision to work with producer and composer Jon Brion. A revered figure in the music world, Brion has collaborated with artists including Fiona Apple and Kanye West and created the scores for such films as Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Punch-Drunk Love. Recorded at Capitol Records' famed Studio B, The Only Place features a cleaner and richer sound than other Best Coast releases. Many of the songs' arrangements are detailed with subtle percussion and unexpected instrumentation. Intricate but never overworked, the biggest change from previous releases is how it showcases Cosentino's voice, this time letting it ring clear, unhidden by distortion and reverb.

The Only Place is full of heartbreakers and kiss-offs. But the true heart of The Only Place, and everything that Best Coast does, is the collaboration between Cosentino and Bruno. For this album the pair continued to work with the system they developed during the band's unassuming beginnings: Cosentino creates a rough demo of each song on her own with vocals and a basic guitar part, then sends it to Bruno who fleshes out the instrumentation and structure. The only time they work on the song together is when they are in the studio. Bruno is a music veteran and has recorded, producer and engineered with a wide variety of artists. "Best Coast is the easiest thing I've ever done musically," he says. "We don't really argue. I told Beth from day one, 'If you ever don't like something I'm doing or you want to change something, just tell me. I know it's not personal. My feeling aren't going to get hurt.' Having established that before we even played a single note together, we've always had clear communication." Cosentino adds, "This record would not have been anywhere near what it is without Bobb Bruno. I owe so much to him. I am so thankful have him in my life and having him turn these things I write in my bedroom into epic songs."

Since the album's release, Best Coast has toured concert halls and festival stages around the world, appeared on David Letterman, Jimmy Fallon, Conan O'Brien and the cover of Spin Magazine, featured in a Microsoft television commercial and in campaigns for Bushmills, Clarks and Rdio, created a fashion line for Urban Outfitters, dueted with Iggy Pop and Kendrick Lamar, had music featured on Girls and The New Girl, and will be opening the entire Green Day arena tour in 2013.

The Ghost Inside

Conceived in the spring of 2007, The Ghost Insideemerged with a vengeance from the Los Angeles music scene where dreams fade just as fast as they are born. The band was a fresh new start for friends Jonathan Vigil, Aaron Brooks, and Tyler Watamanuk who's former band, "A Dying Dream" had recently disintegrated after half of the members moved on. This left Vigil and company quite discouraged as they had just released an EP with hardcore heavyweights "Mediaskare Records." Fueled by their frustration, and determination to never give up, they founded The Ghost Inside and enlisted drummer KC Stockbridge, and guitarist Soyer Cole to round out the all-star lineup.

With the roster solidified and plans to conquer the world, The Ghost Inside began crafting their own unique brand of aggressive yet melodic metal/hardcore. Their collective goal was to write music that would transcend genres without boundaries, and set them apart from their peers putting them into a league of their own. All of the hard work paid off when in April of 2007; the band released their debut album entitled "Fury And The Fallen Ones" on Mediaskare Records.

After the full length was released, interest in the band intensified as they toured nonstop throughout North America with bands such as Bury Your Dead, Misery Signals, Bring Me The Horizon, Emmure, Stick To Your Guns, As Blood Runs Black, Winds Of Plague, and Sleeping Giant. In June of 2008, the band took their act overseas when they were asked to go to Australia with I Killed The Prom Queen. After a year of touring, The Ghost Inside parted ways with Soyer Cole, and suffered a brief hiccup when Tyler Watamanuk decided that life on the road was not for him and called it quits. The band quickly rallied and enlisted Garrett Harer on bass and Zach Johnson to take over guitar duties. Later that summer, The Ghost Inside was invited to be a part of the massive "Ten For Ten Tour" featuring Poison The well, Madball, Bane, Terror, and Vision Of Disorder as the headlining acts. Hammering out high- energy sets every night on this tour quickly earned the band a reputation for their intense live show and their hard-working attitude.

Coming off of a great 2 years on the road, the band gathered their new material and headed into the studio to record their follow up album entitled "Returners" which is hitting stores February 2010. Later this fall, the band heads to Europe on the "Imperial Never Say Die" Tour, followed by runs in Southeast Asia, Australia and New Zealand. Their long term goal: To continue to put out new music, and tour in as many new places as possible all the while, crushing everything in their path. If you have not yet seen The Ghost Inside, you owe it to yourself to drop whatever you are doing and get to one of their shows immediately!

Punk rock used to be about haggard road warriors. Before all the breakdowns and flat irons, there were busted transmissions and collect calls home. The Flatliners grew up believing in the later and rejecting the former, and after seven years playing together, they're unleashing Cavalcade, their third full-length record and an epic sonic testament to the life they've chosen.

Over the last four years, the Flatliners have spent almost thirty months in vans, dive bars, and concert halls across North America, Europe, and Japan, building up a dedicated following with a sound that mixes the endless fury of '90s skate punk with the nuanced, intelligent songwriting of classic post-punks like the Replacements and Hot Water Music. After releasing the ska-punk tinged Destroy to Create (Union Label Group) in 2005, the band evolved into a harsh melodic machine with 2007's The Great Awake (Fat Wreck Chords), completing their transition into a vital modern punk unit with the Cynics 7" (Fat Wreck Chords) in late 2009.

For Cavalcade, the Flatliners once again teamed up with long-time producer and friend Steve Rizun, recording sporadically between tours in their hometown of Toronto over the course of 2009. Seeking to immortalize the last year of their lives on the road, the end result is easily the band's finest hour; from the thrashy immediacy of "The Calming Collection" to the dub-influenced "He Was A Jazzman", it's the sound of a band hitting their stride musically and finding their voice lyrically, exploring the idea of unity through disconnectedness, of positivity in uncertain times. Driving home the theme are the numerous guest appearances on the record: members of Cancer Bats, A Wilhelm Scream, Dillinger Four, The Snips, Junior Battles, Permanent Bastards, and the Expos all contributed to Cavalcade. Add to that the presence of veteran punk Fat Mike, who flew up to jam with the band in November of 2009, earning an additional production credit and making one of the band's childhood dreams come true.

They've grown up on record and in front of a crowd of like-minded punks. They've made sacrifices to keep the wheels of their van on the road, and Cavalcade is the reward. It really is, as the band says, "a call to arms to all who travel throughout the world on the wings of their creativity."

Structures is a five piece metal/progressive/hardcore band hailing from Toronto, Ontario. With members aging from only 19-20, the band wrote and recorded a five song EP which was self released April 6th. Structures maintains a strong work ethic combined with a positive outlook on the music industry pushing them into a leading role in the Canadian music scene. Structures provides a highly energetic live performance, leaving a memorable impression on every audience. They will be releasing their debut full length entitled "Divided By" via Sumerian Records on October 24th 2011 which was recorded with Will Putney at the Machine Shop.

Single Mothers

Single Mothers broke up in 2009 - and have been playing shows ever since.

$69.98 - $189.98

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Riot Fest Toronto - WEEKEND PASS with The Replacements, A Day To Remember, Iggy & the Stooges, Pierce The Veil, The Weakerthans, Every Tim...

Saturday, August 24 · 2:00 PM at Fort York

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