White Arrows

White Arrows stands at these balmy crossroads like a vision from an alternate reality: classic without leaning on nostalgia, visionary but not unfamiliar. What should be a collision of sounds and styles—ritualistic rhythm and four-four thump, synth sequences and strummed guitars, garage-y grind and airy atmosphere—is, in this quintet’s capable hands, a fluidly seething whole. Call it Psychotropical pop, something both busy and breezy. Call it Paul Simon in space (others have). Call it what you will. This is White Arrows.

The White Arrows story begins with a blind boy. Singer Mickey Church was born seeing the world as an impressionistic smear. His vision was righted at age 11, but his imagination ran wild for the intervening years. His memory of growing up in L.A. is confined to smells, sounds and swaths of fuzzy color. With family back east, Mickey eventually left for NYU, and unexpectedly wound up creating his own major with a degree in shamanistic ritual.

The band consists of his younger brother Henry, who started playing drums for the band while still in high school, their old friend J.P. Caballero, previously of Dios Malos, on guitar, Andrew Naeve on keys and electronics, and Steven Vernet on bass. The five bonded over a shared love for sensory overload both aural and visual—essential to the White Arrows live show which currently employs plenty of fog, lights and visuals with hopes of making it bigger and better each tour. With only a 7-inch to sell, they toured with Cults, Those Darlins, The Naked and Famous, played Sasquatch, opened for Weezer, and held residencies at home and in London in 2011.

With the release of the album, “Dry Land Is Not A Myth” in June, the band has been on the road almost continuously this year with Beat Connection, White Denim, Givers, and Unknown Mortal Orchestra with no plans to slow down and trips to Australia, the United States, and both the UK and Europe to close out the year.

The romanticism and desolation of Los Angeles breeds a restlessness in it's people. It's a brooding temperament best captured by Echo Park's NO - a band that feels it in their bones, with the kind of fevered anticipation for something more. Frontman Bradley Hanan Carter's baritone vocals speak to the tension between the wanting and waiting, waiting for love or for some kind of order or sense to how it all works. Their track, "Stay With Me" is a ballad of calculated pleas. Of slow, delicate movements. It's being in love with someone, and hoping for some kind of stillness in the unpredictability of love. He asks, "wasn't there a place for me/inside your heart?" It's all the words you'd ever want your lover to say, the fantastic notion of running away, the return to youth, when everything was uncomplicated and wonderful.

NO began as a response to the limiting idea behind the word. In an effort to reclaim it, and reinterpret it as more than just an antithesis to possibility. These are sing-along songs, hymnal and anthema-tic; born out of a desire to connect with the greater collective of young people seeking their truth, adventure, love. There are remnants of odes to Bill Callahan, The National, and Arcade Fire -- epic, atmospheric drums that pulsate, buttered bass tones, melodic choruses.

It's not about naivety, it's about not being calloused by a city of strangeness and strangers. Something the band knows quite well. The band itself is composed of near-veterans, all claiming a vast history with various bands, solo efforts, defunct projects, cities-travelled, loves made and lost. The core of NO first emerged mid 2010 when through a chance meeting at a local breakfast diner, Sean and Bradley started sharing songs they had both been working on. Shortly after Joseph started coming around too, and after many months of creating, and finding Reese and Mike, it seemed there would be no choice not to finish whatever it was they were starting.

NO marvels at the growing pains of a vibrant city, in all of it's aching limbs and veins that run down dead ends. They'd rather listen to the children laughing at Logan Street Elementary School down their quiet streets, or kiss their girlfriends with all the hope that things will always feel this way. The interplay between hope and despair weaves itself throughout the collection of six songs in their debut EP "Don't Worry, You'll Be Here Forever" a sentiment that suggests that wherever "here" might be, it's a good place to start.

Bad Suns are a band from Los Angeles. The band’s back history is minimal: founded at the top of 2012, and spending the majority of that year writing and recording. However, in the first month of the band’s existence, after sending out a demo of the song “Transpose” to KROQ 106.7 FM, Kat Corbett decided to air the song on their Locals Only program. Much to the band’s surprise, the song reigned in the top 5 of the show for nearly three months (reaching number one on three separate occasions.)

This was an encouraging response for only a demo. The band continued writing, and in June entered Infrasonic Studios in Los Angeles, with producer Eric Palmquist (Wavves, Aloe Blacc, Trash Talk). The band quickly began to attain a steady Los Angeles following, playing to packed houses within the area (The Troubadour, Viper Room) and generating local buzz. “Cardiac Arrest” was chosen as the first single from these sessions.

As of March 3, 2013: “Cardiac Arrest” is being played on KROQ’s Local’s Only show, every Sunday night.

DJ Kat Corbett

$12.00 - $15.00

Off Sale

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White Arrows with NO, Bad Suns, DJ Kat Corbett

Friday, July 19 · Doors 8:00 PM / Show 9:00 PM at Bootleg Theater

Off Sale