Twenty years ago, Wesley Schultz saw the future.

Back then, growing up in the New York City suburb of Ramsey, New Jersey, Wesley spent his days drawing side by side with his best friend, Josh Fraites. Today, as bandleader of The Lumineers, Wesley's replaced his pencil with a guitar, his drawings with songs, and plays side by side with Joshua's younger brother Jeremiah. He still practices a lot, and it still turns out good.

But The Lumineers' story didn't come so easily.
It begins in 2002, the year Jeremiah's brother, Josh, died from a drug overdose at 19. Amidst the loss and grief, Wes and Jer found solace in music, writing songs and playing gigs around New York. After battling the city's cutthroat music scene and impossibly high cost of living, the two decided to expand their horizons. They packed everything they owned—nothing more than a couple suitcases of clothes and a trailer full of musical instruments—and headed for Denver, Colorado. It was less a pilgrimage than act of stubborn hopefulness.

The first thing they did in Denver was place a Craigslist ad for a cellist, and the first person to respond was Neyla Pekarek, a classically trained Denver native. As a trio, they began playing at the Meadowlark, a gritty basement club where the city's most talented songwriters gathered every Tuesday for an open mic and dollar PBRs. Neyla softened Wes and Jer's rough edges while expanding her skills to mandolin and piano. And so The Lumineers sound took shape; an amalgam of heart-swelling stomp-and-clap acoustic rock, classic pop, and front-porch folk.
In 2011, an eponymous, self-recorded EP led to a self-booked tour, and before long The Lumineers started attracting devout fans, first across the Western US, then back in their old East Coast stamping grounds. Young, old and in-between, they're drawn by songs like "Ho Hey" and "Stubborn Love," Americana-inflected barnburners in the vein of the Avett Brothers and Mumford & Sons. They're drawn by songs like "Slow it Down" and "Dead Sea," slow, sultry ballads that suggest the raw revelations of Jeff Buckley and Ryan Adams. They're drawn by the live Lumineers experience—a coming-together in musical solidarity against isolation, adversity, and despair.

The roots revival of the last few years has primed listeners for a new generation of rustic, heart-on-the-sleeve music—the kind that nods to tradition while setting off into uncharted territory. The Lumineers walk that line with an unerring gift for timeless melodies and soul-stirring lyrics. It will all be on display soon, on the band's first full-length album, due in March.

Born out of sorrow, powered by passion, ripened by hard work, The Lumineers have found their sound when the world needs it most.

"There was this feeling inside me going into making this record that we'd never made an album before," says guitarist/vocalist Scott McMicken of Dr. Dog's Shame, Shame, their Anti- debut and the first album made outside the safe confines of their home studio.
As a band that has traditionally built their scrappily spirited albums layer by layer in the undisturbed seclusion of their Philadelphia studio, Dr. Dog realized they would need to leave these comforts and work in a professional studio with the help of an outside engineer and producer if they were to continue their album-by-album growth. In Rob Schnapf (Beck, Elliott Smith) they found a producer who had earned his reputation making albums in much the same fashion as Dr. Dog had, eventually moving on to the bigger and better sounds that they now wanted. With his help, the intricate arrangements of Fate were peeled back to reveal the raw immediacy of a tight five-man unit honing their craft.
Despite their loyal hometown following, Dr. Dog could have very well remained a Philadelphia phenomenon had McMicken's then-girlfriend not slipped a copy of Toothbrush, a collection of home recordings, to Jim James of My Morning Jacket, who would take them on their first tour and prepare the way for the waves of positive press that would greet 2005's Easy Beat. By 2007, their next album We All Belong was earning the band opening slots for Wilco and the Raconteurs and they were turning up all over late night television. They upped the ante with their sonically ambitious Fate and started headlining their own tours. By the spring of 2009, the treadmill had run them ragged, and their new songs reflected a life spent with the nagging realization that things were out of a balance.
Dr. Dog has created a song cycle of doubt and despair, bookended with the woozily swirling harmonies of Leaman's lonely opener "Stranger" and the harsh self-critique of the title track, a gnarled admission that sometimes it's best to admit your mistakes and move on. Their most openly autobiographical release, ranging from McMicken's exploration of West Philly underlife in "Shadow People" to his account of two soul-bearing late night conversations in "Jackie Wants a Black Eye," it's an album whose dark themes are soothed by bright harmonies, taut guitar riffs, and soaring melodies.

Nathaniel Rateliff

Singer-songwriter Nathaniel Rateliff has made his way from modest means in Bay, Missouri (population 60) to the international stage. After signing with Rounder Records Rateliff toured relentlessly in 2010 and 2011 supporting his critically acclaimed debut in Memory of Loss; headlining shows and performing major festivals throughout the USA, Canada, UK and Europe. His work has been praised by Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant who called Rateliff's music "fragmented and poignant." Plant also placed Rateliff's haunting track "Early Spring Till" atop his iTunes celebrity play list. In May of 2011 Rateliff performed two songs on the UK's biggest music program Later…with Jools Holland. Rateliff has played multiple dates with some of the most popular names in music including Mumford & Sons, the Fray, Bon Iver, Laura Marling, Tallest Man on Earth, Low Anthem, Delta Spirit and Jessica Lea Mayfield to name a few. Rateliff is currently working on his sophomore record which is expected to be released in Spring
2012.

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The Lumineers with Dr. Dog, Nathaniel Rateliff

Monday, October 7 · Doors 5:30 PM / Show 6:30 PM at Farm Bureau Insurance Lawn at WRSP