Watch & Listen

The Tillers got their start in August 2007 when they started thumping around with some banjos and guitars and a big wooden bass. Their earliest gigs were for coins and burritos on the city’s famous Ludlow Street in the district of Clifton. The songs they picked were mostly older than their grandparents. Some came from Woody Guthrie, some were southern blues laments, and many were anonymous relics of Appalachian woods, churches, riverboats, railroads, prairies, and coal mines.

Their look didn’t fit the stereotype. They were clearly recovering punk rockers with roots in city’s west side punk rock and hardcore scene. The punk influence gave their sound a distinctive bite, setting them apart from most other folk acts- a hard-driving percussive strum and stomp that brought new pulse and vinegar to some very old songs. But their musical range soon proved itself as they floated from hard-tackle thumping to tender graceful melody, all the while topped by Oberst and Geil’s clear tenor harmonies.

They began picking up weekly gigs around the city’s bar scene. It didn’t take long before their signature treatment of classic folk songs became the preferred versions of Cincinnati locals. Their audiences swelled, growing into an assortment of grey-haired mechanics, neo-hippies, farmers, punkers, professors, and random strays all stomping, clapping, singing, and belting outbursts of “John Henry!” “Darlin’ Corey!” Ever since, the band has come to each show with the same energy. They are magnetic showmen, mature musicians, and colorful storytellers.

The Tillers have since won over Cincinnati’s bar and festival scene, and launching tours with tireless momentum. They were awarded CityBeat Magazine’s Cincinnati Entertainment Award for best Folk and Americana act in 2009, 2010, 2013 and 2014. Their relentless gigging has taken them throughout the East coast, the Midwest and West, the Appalachian south and to the UK and Ireland opening for the St.Louis crooner, Pokey LaFarge. In the summer of 2009, veteran NBC news anchor Tom Brokaw featured the Tillers on a documentary about US Route 50. Brokaw showcased the group’s song “There is Road (Route 50)” as a testimony to the highway’s role as a connective tissue of the nation.

Musically, the band wears many hats. Their sound has proven to be an appropriate fit with a wide range of musical styles- traditional folk, bluegrass, jazz, punk rock and anything else they might run into. They have shared the stage with a broad swath of national touring acts, ranging from renowned folk legends such as Doc Watson, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Guy Clark, Country Joe McDonald, Jerry Douglas, Iris Dement, Pokey LaFarge and The Carolina Chocolate Drops to rambunctious rock daredevils like the Legendary Shack Shakers.

Always moving, the Tillers continue to enter new territory. Their musical growth can be heard through the scape of their many releases, 2008′s debut record Ludlow Street Rag, 2010′s By The Signs, 2011′s Wild Hog in the Woods, 2012′s Live from the Historic Southgate House, 2013′s Hand On The Plow and many more bootleg releases. The band’s lineup has also taken new shape. In February 2010, long-time bassist Jason Soudrette fondly parted ways with the group, being replaced by Aaron Geil, brother of guitarist Sean. Recalibrating has not slowed their pace.

They continue to plot their travels around the map, electrifying new places and making new friends wherever they go. From place to place, they carry with them more instruments, new songs, and funnier stories. They are Cincinnati’s traveling minstrels. Expect to hear from them soon.

Woody Pines

No stranger to fans of the new folk music coming from all corners of the USA. Alongside artists like Old Crow Medicine Show and Pokey LaFarge, Woody Pines continues to forage thru the secret world of old 78′s and to write new chapters in the Anthology of American Music. Integrating sounds from Leadbelly to Bob Dylan, from Woodie Guthrie to Preservation Hall, Woody Pines belts out songs of fast cars, pretty women and hard luck with a distinctive vintage twang.
Woody was a founding member of the Kitchen Syncopators, a legendary busking street jug-band from Eugene, OR, that were one of the most exciting acts to emerge out of the West Coast folk scene in recent history. Since the Kitchen Syncopators disbanded years ago, Woody Pines has been writing and recording albums and frequently performing for audiences everywhere, while co-founder of the band, Gill Landry, has gone on to join Old Crow Medicine Show while pursuing his own solo projects.
Recently signing with Nashville’s Muddy Roots Music, for the release of the much anticipated new record and the subsequent release of Woody’s four independent releases has this band working hard in the studio, on the road, and on the songwriting front-line.
The distinctive viper sound is brought together with Skip Frontz Jr. on the upright bass, adding both foot tappin’ low-end and rapid fire percussion with his sought after slap technique that has blown people away night after night. Brad Tucker on the vintage electric guitar and vocal harmonies fills out the trio, working his magic to make the band sound bigger then they are. Woody plays the National Guitar, harmonica and floor tom, singing in a voice sounding uncannily like a young Willie Nelson.
“Woody Pines brings that low-key street corner style of performance to his stage show, but with all the polish and seasoned professionalism of tour-bus-and-green-room rock stardom.” ~ Ali Marshall, Mtn Xpress

$10.00 - $12.00

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The Southgate House Revival-Sanctuary

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The Tillers with Woody Pines, Saro Lynch Thomason

Friday, July 5 · Doors 8:00 PM / Show 9:00 PM at The Southgate House Revival-Sanctuary