Welcome to Happy Valley—an oddly untouched neighborhood in the corner of Los Angeles, that has served home over the decades to wild buffalo, an ostrich farm, a racetrack, and now, CILLIE BARNES. In a house carved into a hillside of land time has forgotten, is where Cillie, a musician, songwriter, and supernatural psychic, resides…

The house is a mystical artist's denizen, with walls covered in hanging tapestries, shelves filled with crystals and other apothecary, a garden where you'll stumble upon a ceramic effigy among the succulents and ferns, and an ever-shifting group of nomadic inhabitants. Inside lays a modest recording studio where Cillie concocts her self-described "gyp-hop" music, which embodies the eclectic, multi-faceted nature of herself. The enchanting Newport Beach native – daughter of convicted bank robber father and art teacher mother – moved to Los Angeles at 17 and has been here ever since.

In her house in the hill, Cillie and musical co-conspirator Joe Keefe wrote and demoed the songs that appear on her debut, a five-song collection, that recounts her time and experiences. It's the first in a series of four collections, each with its own feel, like chapters in a much longer narrative.

Cillie and Joe developed the songs over the course of a few years, each showcasing her gravelly yet charming voice, hip-hop flow, and literary, but conversational, lyricism. The opening number, "Hey Hi," takes the listener on a journey from smoky LA bars to the crisp country air in Woodstock, New York.

Using Jordan Kolasinski's music as a backdrop, she explores feelings that arose when she returned to her favorite ride at Southern California theme park, Knott's Scary Farm, 'Blood Bayou,' as an adult ("Halloween Haunt, Halloween Haunt/You don't thrill me like you used to").

"Mr. Brainwash" slowly builds "like TNT and Dy-no-mite" to explore the emotions after being tied up and robbed in a Hollywood apartment owned by the infamous street artist. She fittingly describes her feelings after the event ("We be like Cleo and Marc Antony/Way we're going down").

"Solstice" delves into her Wiccan spirituality, singing, "I'll be bringing in my solstice/In my Stevie Nicks Dress/Channeling my Energy to make my life/Less of a mess," while "Veranda" explores the heartache of forbidden love.

And then, fittingly, there's "Happy Valley." While it's a song about a place, it's also about what she's created and experienced since moving there, including this collection of music.

Much like the 'Fool' in her deck of Tarot cards, is the spirit of Cillie—exuberant, clever, and ready to take on the first steps to a long unknown journey ahead, whatever it may be…

In late 2012, Wild Ones was on the verge of collapse. Guitarist Clayton Knapp had blown out an eardrum, the band’s original drummer left the group and his replacement, Seve Sheldon, was in the hospital with a punctured lung, practicing songs on a drum pad with a tube sticking out of his chest. The band’s members had funneled all of their money into a debut record, Keep It Safe, that had taken a year to write and nine months to record and mix. Fans and followers began to wonder if that record would ever see the light of day. It was make-or-break time. Wild Ones made. Instead of folding in the face of financial drama, injuries and personnel changes, Wild Ones took a deep breath and adjusted to its new surroundings. This band is used to adjusting. Since its formation in 2010, Wild Ones has insisted on operating as a DIY collective. The band recorded and mixed its debut as a group (with help from engineer David Pollock). Sometimes considering each members’ opinion meant endless revisits and tweaks to the album’s tracks. The process was time-consuming, but it was also worth it. “That was a reaction to the bands we had been in before,” says lead vocalist Danielle Sullivan. “This band was born out of our desire to have a democratic, all-inclusive music-making process.” Going it alone—even the artwork on Keep It Safe was created by Wild Ones keyboardist Thomas Himes—comes with its fair share of challenges. Most of Wild Ones’ debut was recorded in a two-story East Portland warehouse rehearsal space, where the band was surrounded on all sides by rock acts like Quasi and the Thermals. Wild Ones would get to their practice space around 8 am to record, often grabbing quick takes between thunderous drum solos from down the hall. “Somewhere on the record, if you listen close enough, you can probably hear the metal band next door,” Himes says. “When we went in that room in March, it was raining,” says Knapp. “When we finished recording in October, it was raining.” Keep It Safe, the album that finally emerged after well over a year of gestation, is bigger than the sum of its meticulously gathered parts. Even now, the band’s sound continues to evolve. Wild Ones’ members come from vastly disparate musical backgrounds—guitarist Nick Vicario was a Portland punk icon long before he turned 18; bassist Max Stein is a classical composer—and all of their experiences inform pop music that is influenced by everything from german techno to American R&B. These are sounds that don’t usually come packaged together, but in the able hands of Wild Ones, they seem like a perfectly natural fit.

My Body

Founded in 2012, bred by the Portland music scene, the duo came together over their need to create a new sound. Six months in a locked bedroom assembling sounds into songs, My Body was born. Backed by a live band they gained momentum in the Portland music scene opening for the likes of How to Dress Well, Pure Bathing Culture and Wild Ones. Relocating to Brooklyn, NY in 2012, they reformed as a synth-pop two-piece and began playing shows.

They will be touring the West Coast with Wild ones in July 2013, and are planning to release an EP within the coming months.

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Cillie Barnes with Wild Ones, My Body

Saturday, July 13 · Doors 8:00 PM / Show 9:00 PM at Bootleg Bar

Off Sale