Formed in early 2012 by songwriter-composer Keegan DeWitt and multi-instrumentalist Jeremy Bullock, Wild Cub's debut LP 'Youth' was released last August in the US, and showcases the now five-piece band's dexterity in seamless transitions between infectious electro-pop, tropical rhythms, and quiet washes of cinematic reflection.

PASTE has called 'Youth' "full of small complexities that fill songs as they unwittingly slide into each other" and The Wall Street Journal's Speakeasy deemed Wild Cub one of '12 Acts to Watch' at the 2012 CMJ Music Marathon, while Entertainment Weekly recommended lead single "Thunder Clatter" as "clattering joyful noise." Press attention has continued with Nylon giving their 'Band Crush' stamp of approval, as well as video and track premieres on noted sites such as SPIN, PASTE, IFC, RCRD LBL, Refinery29 and more. A cover of Jessie Ware's "Running" & a remix of Atlas Genius' "Symptoms" brought increased awareness, the band's electrifying live show has established Wild Cub as a force.
Freshly into 2013, the band has seen the release of Youth in the UK, with notable press attention from Clash Music, The Guardian, The Line Of Best Fit ("Youth relentlessly offers up huge pop songs delivered with sheer gusto & intelligence"), and Top Shop ("sweet, tropically-tinged, dance-y pop"). Not ones to rest for long, the band recently performed at designer Rebecca Minkoff's NY Fashion Week show and burned through eight shows at this year's SXSW festival. Wild Cub's busy year will continue this summer with multiple festival performances – including at the Hangout Fest in May – and more touring to come.

Wild Cub is: Keegan DeWitt (vocals/guitar), Jeremy Bullock (guitar/synths), Dabney Morris (drums), Harry West (bass), and Eric Wilson (keys/synths).

The Hundred Days

"Experiencing The Hundred Days live was one of those reminders that the world is a really beautiful place." --SF Examiner

"The Hundred Days are an absolute must-see." --The Owlmag

San Francisco's smartest new young band, The Hundred Days, have released the second single and video off their debut album, Really? The video for "Girl At a Party", directed by David Dutton, is a raucous, fun-filled romp through a gigantic bash with a gorgeous lady as your guide. Magnetic Magazine exclusively premiered the video for the month of August.

With driving rhythms, soaring guitars, textural keyboards and powerful vocal melodies, The Hundred Days push indie/alt rock in new directions. Drawing from a variety of influences (postpunk, alternative, britpop), the band's familiar, yet intrinsically unique sound has been compared to The Cure, Echo and the Bunnymen, and Radiohead as well as contemporary rockers Franz Ferdinand, The Bravery and The Killers. A moody, dynamic indie rock band, The Hundred Days showcase tight musicianship complemented by razor-sharp pop writing capabilities with both sophistication and urgency.

Rare Times's Don't Stray is one of those songs that you hear at the start of the year and know you will still be playing at the end. It is a near-classic of smooth soulfulness with a despondent late-night ambience, and a hint of the drama that results from the threat of an affair. It was created in Alameda Towers, a warehouse filled with porn studios and sweatshops in Los Angeles, and some of that sepia sleaziness creeps into the song's atmosphere. It was made by a jazz pianist, an electronic producer, a percussionist and a guitarist, and all of those elements are evident on the track, even if its surfaces are so polished it is sometimes hard to tell.

It is probably easier to tell that it is the work of a band influenced equally by kind-of-blue jazz (Chet Baker, say), 1980s/1990s R&B (Keith Sweat is their favourite) and digital disco (Metro Area's self-titled 2002 album is sublimely relevant to the music under scrutiny). Don't Stray – about a man trying to control his impulse to cheat on his girlfriend – also makes us think of the late-night soul-pop of Sade. It has a similar air of languid melancholy. Weirdly, Rare Times don't look like smooth operators or refugees from the suaver parts of London's club culture, they look like an indie band, all vests and shades, GG$ sweatshirts and Levis, straggly hair and scruffy beards. And yet they sound as though they'd resemble Robert Palmer's slightly more debonair older brothers, sipping dry martinis after another night of empty seduction in the penthouses of downtown LA.

No One's Looking Out, the first track on their debut Missionary EP – the first of three to come this year – finds the missing link between mellifluous jazz-pop and chillwave, like Michael Bublé in a bubble-bath with Washed Out. "You know that I'm gonna come back around," promises singer (crooner) Anthony Calonico, adding: "No pressure, don't worry," before ever so slightly losing his cool: "You know that I don't want to fuck around." The urge to share his affections with the female population of Little Tokyo increases on Don't Stray, a deeper foray into downtempo electronic balladry and, at seven minutes and 45 seconds, an epic of etiolated rhythm and sorrow. Immaculately produced, spaciously arranged, it's like the designer apartment of a mid-1980s lothario in here. Slow jam of the year. Nice one, Rare Times. Maybe they can buy some new clothes to celebrate.

$10.00 - $12.00

Tickets Available at the Door

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Neck of the Woods

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Wild Cub with The Hundred Days, Rare Times

Tuesday, July 30 · Doors 8:00 PM / Show 9:00 PM at Neck of the Woods

Tickets Available at the Door