FULL MOON:, Miami Horror

FULL MOON:

The third annual Full Moon will be held at The Beach at Governors Island in New York Harbor on Saturday June 22nd
1 island, 2 stages, 8 hours, 10 artists, ONE FULL MOON

Drawing inspiration from the legendary full moon parties of Thailand, MATTE's Full Moon infuses New York’s distinct culture and edge – a transcendental beach party in the middle of New York Harbor with sounds by a carefully crafted lineup of musicians & DJs.

The Beach will be the perfect urban paradise for a Full Moon - a sunset over the Statue of Liberty, a moonrise over Lower Manhattan. New York can be the most amazing place in the world, and moments like this are why.

After years in the making here at last is Illumination, the fully realized debut album from Australia’s favourite psychedelic indie-electronic adventurers Miami Horror. With Illumination, Miami Horror has delivered on the promise of two years of teeth-cutting live shows and an ever escalating wave of buzz that’s made the group bonafide blog darlings the world over. But what’s most amazing about the grand arrival of Illumination is that the roots of the record stretch back countless moons to when Miami Horror began as just one synthesizer-obsessed producer huddled over a laptop in a bedroom-come-studio and the album itself just a spark waiting to be lit.

Kick started by Ben Plant, Miami Horror was created out of a love of Roland keyboards and French house, landing the young producer on everyone’s radar overnight with a slew of sharp remixes and productions in his arsenal. Yet it was while Ben was punching out 2008’s epochal Bravado EP that Miami Horror took off in a completely new and different direction thanks to the recruitment of Josh Moriarty, the wiry guitarist and dexterous vocalist that would become Miami Horror’s powerhouse frontman. Together the two cut the lushly organic summer jam Sometimes with Josh on croon duties and the idea to drastically alter Miami Horror’s genetic makeup into a crowd-swelling live entity was born.

“It started out that I didn’t want to have any guitar on the album besides a little funk guitar or disco bass,” Ben grins while explaining the turning point for Miami Horror’s evolution. “But then Josh came in and started playing all these other parts that sounded amazing. Paired with what I was working on, nobody was doing anything like it, so I knew we had to turn those sounds into a live thing and just go wild.”

With Ben and Josh wanting to flex their creative muscles and avoid the limitations of being stereotyped as simply a dance or electro act, the pair rewired Miami Horror’s future, deputising two new talents with Dan Whitechurch taking up the keys and drummer and co-production whiz Aaron Shanahan completing Miami Horror’s live transformation.

Since the switch Miami Horror has launched into dizzying new stratospheres, their well-polished chops as a live group making for some unmissable sets at Australia’s biggest festivals leading to sell-out shows in Rio, Mexico City, New York and Los Angeles – the latter of which Miami Horror will call home when they relocate in September ‘11.

“I think we have a lot of energy live and people seem to really resonate with it,” Josh explains of Miami Horror’s live allure. “I’ve always been disappointed by that side of electronic music that’s just two guys behind computers triggering samples with no connection with an audience. This is a real live rock band. I just want to excite people and make them have a great time at our shows,” he adds when quizzed on his firebrand onstage persona. “People have, and always will love showmanship and it’s something I always try to add to the performance.”

All this time Ben had been further noodling away at Miami Horror’s long-awaited debut disc and with the vision for a fully-blown and creatively shared band now fulfilled Miami Horror was able to pour all of their energy into Illumination, the record that’s taken Miami Horror years to perfect and Ben a whole lifetime to get right.

Bunkering down in Ben’s own studio in Melbourne, Illumination was recorded in typical Miami Horror fashion with the band opening themselves up to new styles and approaches which saw them call in a cast of guest stars including Swedish singer MAI, Melbourne based chanteuse Kimbra, Dappled Cities’ wordsmith Tim Derricourt for a lyrical assist and also Neon Indian and Vega prodigy Alan Palomo who flew out from the US to add his distinctive haze to multiple tunes.

As well as crafting a truly classic album that begs to be consumed from beginning to end to fully uncover all the layers and engrossing sonic textures of each tune, Ben says the aim with Illumination was to present an accurate portrait of the band’s current core and not make things too “glossy” and “hi-fi”, with Ben himself producing and engineering the album from the confines of his bedroom.

As such, listening to Illumination is like a guided tour of Miami Horror’s combined minds, with enormous flying grooves gliding through the speakers alongside nods to the deities of French house and vintage synth explorers like Giorgio Moroder and Jan Hammer, all mixed and muddled up with slabs of melting, fuzzy psychedelica, some wandering kraut rock bass-lines, enough star-gazing hooks to make Electric Light Orchestra blush, plenty of ear-catching pop swagger and Ben’s own studied cinematic aesthetics. Never content to stand still, Miami Horror ambitiously test their boundaries across the album, experimenting with lush, almost chillwave instrumentals (see the gorgeous Infinite Canyons), futuristic disco gems (I Look To You), summer-bound party jams (Holidays) and anthem-sized synth epics (Sometimes).

Although all four members of the band admit to a serious case of perfectionism with months spent, refining, tweaking and endlessly perfecting Illumination, Ben explains the process was worth the time and energy invested. “We spent about ten months alone mixing the album, which is a process that should normally take two weeks,” Ben laughs. “We always just said ‘f**k it, we have to make the album that we want to make’ and this is it. We made it.”

Yes, this is their moment. And though it seemed like an electro-dreamer’s distant fantasy four years ago, Miami Horror’s same excited sense of wonder has only ballooned from then to now. If you haven’t already heard the gospel, expect to be converted to the cause any second now.

Tanlines

Mixed Emotions is the debut album by Tanlines, a Brooklyn NY duo composed of Eric Emm (vocals, guitar, keyboards) and Jesse Cohen (drums, keyboards, bass). Initially born as a production project based out of Emm’s Brooklyn-based Brothers Studio, Tanlines has evolved into a deeply personal, unique electronic pop group.

But before there was Tanlines, there was just Eric and just Jesse, working in separate bands and projects until their paths crossed in 2008. Jesse’s former band had recorded at Eric’s studio; the two got along famously and struck up a friendship. “We have complementary qualities. It’s like a lot of duos, I think. We have different personalities, but we just innately understand each other,” says Cohen. The pair began making music together almost on a lark, deciding one night to remix a song for the band Telepathe, with whom Eric was working at the time, and put it on the internet that same evening for no reason beyond simply doing so. Suddenly, the song was making rounds on the web and being championed by various tastemakers. Their second song, “New Flowers,” written for one of Jesse’s friends’ art projects, had the same reaction, resulting in excellent UK label Young Turks (The XX, SBTRKT) emailing the band to release a single in 2009. “It was at that point that we thought, ‘Okay, this is a real project now,’” says Cohen.

Shows around the world followed, including amazing sets at the likes of The Guggenheim, The Whitney, the New Museum and more in their hometown of NYC (“Our genre was ‘Museum House’ for a while,” jokes Emm), and an opening slot on Strokes frontman Julian Casablancas’s solo tour in 2009. Effortlessly cool Parisian label Kitsune released a Tanlines single, while American label True Panther released the Tanlines’ first EP in 2010. They booked a three week tour in Europe, excited from the exciting things that had been happening to them, only to play some of the most disappointing shows of their career. “It was eye opening,” says Emm. “We realized we had a lot of work to do.” The inspiration for said work came in the form of albums the duo brought with them to listen to while driving through Europe. “We brought R.E.M. records, skate punk records from the 80’s, Born in the USA, stuff like that. Emm says, “listening to them, I became very aware of the lasting resonance of a good song. A good song transcends production trends. That’s what we were missing, and I wanted to start making songs that would have a life of their own.”

Upon returning from the European tour in the spring of 2010, Cohen and Emm returned home to New York to find an eviction notice for the recording studio that Eric and his brother (one-time trance producer Joshua Ryan) had built from the ground up eight years prior. The building had been sold and there were plans to convert it into a homeless shelter (...which was ultimately never built). For two years, the studio had been their figurative, and sometimes literal home (the spare bedroom often housed Jesse Cohen after late night sessions). With all of that change and uncertainty in mind, Tanlines began to work on their first proper album.

That album, Mixed Emotions, is a testament to the benefits and pitfalls of life’s changes, getting older, and being pushed out of one’s comfort zone. The band that was born out of a studio suddenly found themselves without a home base, forced to reevaluate themselves. Emm honed his voice, a confident and tranquil baritone, and focused on lyricism, something he had not done seriously in the past. Many of the songs on Mixed Emotions began as simple songs written on a guitar, with the band later adding their palette of electronic and organic sounds afterwards. “A great song can stick with someone for their whole life,” says Cohen as a means of explanation. “As a musician, you have the opportunity to create that, and that is the thing that you chase. When we were forced to really figure out what we were trying to do with our album, our music in general, and our lives broadly, it was obvious.” Emm attributes his newfound lyrical earnestness and immediacy more directly- “I just reached a point in my life where I wasn’t afraid and didn’t give a shit.”

Emm sings stories about loss, the passage of time, and the lessons and warnings of accumulated knowledge gleaned by someone who has spent an entire lifetime in music. “Real Life,” one of Mixed Emotion’s most bombastic songs, has Emm countering with the searching lyrics: “For a minute I was lost / I looked away/ I was looking for a home / I was looking for a role.” Emm, who by his own account has lived “an extremely unconventional life,” quit school at 15 to play guitar and skateboard, joined his favorite band and toured around the world at 19, and built a studio that hosted some of the area’s most notable underground acts in the mid 2000s, found the displacement both bittersweet and liberating. The lyrics that poured out of him reflect both earnest excitement and wisdom- they are about recognizing the sadness of a loss while still accepting that nothing ever really changes for good. On “Brothers” he sings “You’re just the same as you ever were / You fight and you don’t wonder why it makes no sense, I’m just the same as I ever been / But I’m the only one who doesn’t notice it”.

“This process,” Cohen says, referring to the agita of recording in the midst of the studio loss and its subsequent, sudden adulthood, “felt more like making a movie than an album.” Ultimately, the final step of mixing the album took them to an entirely different musical universe, the Miami-based studio of legendary mixer Jimmy Douglass (Timbaland, Aaliyah, Justin Timberlake, Television, Roxy Music) in whom the band found an unlikely kindred spirit. It was a journey that pushed the band to expand their sonic ambitions and away from the comfort of their previous experiences.

Perhaps that’s why Mixed Emotions feels so vivid—sometimes painful, sometimes transcendent—a very precise labor of love. It obscures and blurs the lines between synthetic and organic sounds, real and fake, happy and sad. It is the sound of stadium pop in small spaces. Before deciding on the name Mixed Emotions, Tanlines’ debut was called ;( (pronounced “winky-sad’), an emoticon of their own creation and the unofficial mascot of the band. A winky-sad is used to indicate something that is sad, but that you can still make a joke about. Musically, it is perhaps a happy-sounding song with melancholic lyrics. It’s the acknowledgment that most things are many things at once. It is Mixed Emotions ;(

Wild Belle is the new duo of siblings Natalie and Elliot Bergman. The two have weaved in and out of each other's musical lives for years sharing records, tapes, sounds and experiences. Wild Belle marks their first official collaboration, finding their sound rooted on a tropical island where rocksteady rhythms, disco beats and soulful grooves shine down steadfast and abundant.

The best music is made by those who expose our very guilty pleasures with undeniable, stimulating creations. This can be said of the mere samples we have received from rising producer Cyril Hahn.
Cyril experimented early on during high school with music production and abandoned it after leaving his hometown of Bern, Switzerland to pursue his studies in Vancouver, Canada. After a 3 year hiatus from music, feeling a need to return to his former love, he sat down and did what is considered by some to be taboo: stripped down two iconic R&B songs and gave them his unique atmospheric twist: Mariah Carey's 'Touch My Body' and Destiny's Child 'Say My Name'.

Cyril's remixes instantly hit a nerve with internet fans and other artists after uploading to his Soundcloud, especially the Destiny's Child anthem. This summer, 'Say My Name' hit #1 on Hype Machine, was selected as the final track by Diplo for his BBC Radio 1 mix show, and posted as a favourite on the fan page of global trendsetting group, The xx. This fall Annie Mac also fell in love with the song, playing it on her radio show, at many of her shows and mentioning it as one of her addictive tracks of the year. 'Say My Name' now has over 600,000 plays on Soundcloud, countless tribute videos with over 2 million YouTube views, and is considered by many to be a favourite of 2012.

Toward the end of the year, Cyril released 3 other remixes that have also become crowd favourites: a hauntingly melodious remix of UK Electropop duo Alpines single 'Chances', followed by the atmospheric remix of Solange's 'Losing You', and the up-tempo, high-energy remix for U.S sister trio HAIM's 'Don't Save Me' (No.2 Hype Machine). Look out for two more official remixes out early 2013.

Let Cyril continue to feed your guilty pleasures with memorable shows & music for years to come

Odes to some far and vague past, attended by grey organs and old strings, delivered



by a horn and raw electronica. That cool quiet just before faith hits. However filled with



suppressed nostalgia, they keep looking towards the future. They, that's Float Fall.



A duo that succeeds in taming the silence and dreaming dreams until everything turns out



all right just once more. Rozanne Descheemaekers' voice guides you straight through the



freezing tracks, but afterwards quietly snuggles up to the hoarse vocals of Ruben Lefever.



Float Fall's songs make you move into another world, one lacking any final description, but



a good place to be nonetheless. A place where the dull rustle of the past gets its second



chance. Right up to the moment that dream and reality collide.

JDH & Dave P [FIXED]

Rumors of NYC nightlife’s demise have been greatly exaggerated. While the ever-pervasive rumors of “no dancing allowed” and draconian cabaret laws continue to reverberate around the world’s cities, the state of underground dance music in the big apple is indeed much stronger. This is thanks, in no small part, to the efforts of Dave Pianka and Josh Houtkin (DJing as Dave P and JDH, respectively). The two have been responsible for bringing over some of the most credible DJs and live bands and giving them a proper venue and environment in which to play. In addition, they have honed their DJ and production skills over the years, and are increasingly breaking new records and sounds with their back-to-back sets. Dave has also recently kicked into gear with production duties, contributing remixes of established acts like the Klaxons and Bloc Party.

The two first met through Josh’s affiliation with Flyer, a now-defunct cultural magazine. They were frequently booked separately to DJ at the same parties in NYC, often in the same rooms.

“We both came from very similar musical backgrounds growing up in the punk/hardcore scene,” says Dave. “We both basically progressed in the same direction from there, into indie rock and into the more electronic sounds where we find ourselves now.”

Says Josh, “Our influences come from a pretty wide variety of places. We both were heavily into the early-90's punk/ indie scene. Fugazi, Dischord Records, Bikini Kill, that sort of stuff.”

The two quickly teamed up, expanding their horizons into techno, electro and other permutations of dance music. In early 2004, they started a party called FIXED at the Tribeca Grand hotel, where they quickly established a forward-thinking booking policy that found heavyweight, Berlin-based techno jocks like Ewan Pearson playing one week, with on-the-rise indie acts such as Little Boots or Friendly Fires the next. To date, blue-chip artists like Erol Alkan, Soulwax, Booka Shade, Justice, Superpitcher, the Klaxons, Peaches, LCD Soundsystem, Mylo, Vitalic, Simian Mobile Disco, The Rapture, Tiefschwarz, M.A.N.D.Y., and many more have all made appearances. The party celebrated its 5-year anniversary in November 2009, with Basement Jaxx headlining the night.

In a city full of nights with style over substance, FIXED is now known as a party with an eclectic crowd of sincere music lovers, where all sorts of interesting styles and genres find a place to come together.

“Aside from our musical upbringing, we are both influenced by nights such as Optimo, Trash, and Bugged Out!, says Josh. “These are great parties that don't necessarily have a musical "policy" or "style." For us, every style of music is good and merits attention.”

In terms of their DJing, the two have forged a defined musical understanding over the years. They often play back-to-back, each pushing one and other to find the perfect record to follow another with. “There are times when Josh and I are djing and one of us will put on a record and we'll both reach for a track to play out of it and then realize that we both grabbed the same one,” says Dave. “We’re both very conscious of flow.”

Going forward, JDH and Dave P look forward to continuing helping interesting acts around the world establish a beachhead on US shores, as well as continuing to bring their act on the road. With recent DJ tours with Simian Mobile Disco and Soulwax, they’re finding wider acclaim on a global stage while keeping up the ravenous appetite for breaking new sounds.

Tickets

add to your calendar

Upcoming Events
The Beach at Governors Island in New York Harbor

  • Sorry, there are currently no upcoming events.

Ticketfly

FULL MOON:, Miami Horror with Tanlines, Wild Belle, Cyril Hahn, The Dolls (Mia Moretti & Caitlin Moe), Float Fall, JDH & Dave P [F...

Saturday, June 22 · Doors 4:00 PM at The Beach at Governors Island in New York Harbor