Saves The Day

Daybreak. It's a fitting title for Saves The Day's upcoming record, the third part of a trilogy that began with 2006's Sound the Alarm and continued with Under The Boards in 2007. "Sound The Alarm is an expression of discontent. Under The Boards is reflection and remorse. Daybreak is acceptance," explains singer-guitarist and chief songwriter Chris Conley. "Daybreak wraps up all the turmoil and misery of the previous two albums and transcends the pain by facing the fear and angst that comes in this Life and turning it into growth and positive change."

Positive change makes sense for a band that has always had a penchant for evolution. After forming in Princeton, New Jersey in 1997, Saves The Day released its debut album, Can't Slow Down, in 1998. The band followed it up with the genre-defining Through Being Cool one year later. 2001's Stay What You Are elevated Saves The Day to an even greater level of success and critical recognition, followed soon after by 2003's In Reverie. In Reverie took an exciting sonic leap from Stay What You Are, which itself was a stylistic departure from Through Being Cool. Each album the band has released has its own distinct style and flair, though they are all undoubtedly Saves The Day through and through.

Fast-forward to 2010, and Saves The Day is evolving once again. After the departure of long time member David Soloway in 2008, along with Mannuel Cerrero and Durijah Lang in 2009 (who left the band to focus on former group Glassjaw), Saves The Day hit the road rocking all their classic tunes with a brand new look. Arun Bali, Rodrigo Palma and Spencer Peterson, now join Conley to round out the Saves The Day lineup. It is with these new members that the band will record Daybreak. As Conley explains, "it makes sense that Daybreak features a new lineup, as thematically the album deals with coming back to Life with a renewed appreciation and attitude of perseverance and acceptance."

Now, with the band ready to release the long-anticipated third part to the trilogy, you get the feeling that a new day is truly breaking for Saves The Day. "Daybreak is both an ending and a new beginning," says Conley. "Daybreak comes back to Life to say, 'we are here together and we can make it through.'"

Into It Over It

Evan Thomas Weiss is more than just a singer-songwriter; he's a storyteller.

The 27-year-old driving force behind solo act Into It. Over It. has been penning his tales since 2007. With music that is wholly heartfelt and unabashedly unapologetic, Weiss has been making waves in both the indie and punk rock worlds since the release of his debut, "52 Weeks."

The collection of songs – which, as the name suggests, was written over the course of a year – began as a project without grand intentions. But as he discovered that people genuinely liked his music, he continued writing. His debut was followed up by a series of splits, featuring songs about towns, which would later be compiled onto "Twelve Towns," an album that came out earlier this year. There was also the split with Koji, featuring five songs about neighborhoods in Chicago, which is where Weiss is located. And finally, in September of this year, Weiss came out with "Proper," a 12-song release which, in some sense, he feels is his first proper album.

"I am so proud of that record, and with the amount of time we had to make it, which wasn't very much, I'm really pleased with how it came out," Weiss said. "And I think people are generally really stoked on it."

Disregarding his track record of writing songs that are thematically related, Weiss' approach this time around was to pay attention to how the songs fit together and fed into one another.

"We made a point to make a cohesive album, which we'd never done before when we were writing songs," Weiss said of the collaboration between himself and drummer Nick Wakim.

With the exception of Wakin's role, the rest of the album is entirely written and performed by Weiss. This, admittedly, can create some confusion on the road for fans who have only heard the recordings and assumed that Into It. Over It. was a full band.

While there is always the possibility of touring with a full backing band, the slight disparity between the recorded and the live versions is something that Weiss treasures when performing in front of crowds.

"I think it adds a different vibe to the songs and it allows them to become more personal for people," he said. "The songs are so personal that it's like I want to share that intimacy with people that would come see the show."

Earlier this month, Weiss played Berlin on his first European tour in two years, opening for The Swellers and Broadway Calls

"It's been nice to get my feet wet again, playing shows here…cause it's a completely different feel," he said of the experience. "[And] it's been rad playing for crowds that aren't necessarily mine…and being able to win a bunch of people over."

Although he has been friends with members of the bands for a long time, Weiss acknowledged that his music doesn't necessarily "fit" with that of theirs. Because of this, audience members who aren't there to see him specifically are often skeptical of him at first. The good thing though, is that he said he acquires new fans that way.

"To see someone get on stage with just an acoustic guitar…you get written off pretty quickly," he said of the experience. "It's definitely been a lot of me, like, having to like, show my worth."

Although Weiss might come across as a songwriting powerhouse, he shared that he isn't always initially confident about his songs, explaining that they don't tend to see the light of day until after they're already recorded and it's too late to take them back.

"I do run into periods of self-doubt," he said of the songwriting. "But really that struggle is just an internal struggle."

When it comes down to it, he said he is proud of each and every one of the songs he has come up with.

"I mean, there's 95 songs [and] I love them all, like, I really like every single song," he said. "You know, maybe there's things about them that I would have changed, had I recorded them again, but, like, as far as the music goes, or the message, or what I was talking about, they're all really important to me."

Looking back on the past four years, Weiss said his attitude toward his songs hasn't changed; the old ones are just as meaningful to him as the new ones. But he did admit that he himself has changed, both as a musician and a human being.

"I'm a little more focused and I'm more responsible and I think I'm just overall a better person than I was when I started, but I think that also just comes with age," he said with a laugh. "I would just say I'm more of a grown-up, like, in a good way, you know. Not in a boring way."

"Please Remain Calm" is the punk album of the Great Recession. The Connecticut five-piece has crafted an album that captures the defeat, the heartache -- what it feels like to be young in the American Decline. Following up 2010's critically acclaimed self-titled LP, "Please Remain Calm" combines elements of Springsteen-esque heartland rock with the band's signature blend of 60s pop melody, 70s punk energy and 80s new wave panache.

Hostage Calm begin "Please Remain Calm" with weaving counter-melodic guitars and bass, stitched together with anthemic choruses. Openers 'On Both Eyes', 'Don't Die On Me Now' and 'Brokenheartland' take the listener through all of the band's signature stylings, setting the mood as the album reveals greater depth and dynamism. A slower, more intimate version of the band's classic 'The "M" Word' features an orchestral arrangement, complete with strings, brass, keys and concert percussion. Immediately following this, the band delivers perhaps its most avant-guarde arrangement, 'Patriot'; a full a cappella ode to a lost love affair with America. What opens as a very electrifying, hit-driven album fully descends into some of the band's most intricate and moving work to date.

But "Please Remain Calm" is more than Hostage Calm's opus: it's their manifesto. Like how "London Calling" captured the gray and grinding Britain of 1979, this album calls to mind the hopeless college student moving back in with her parents, the bank boarding up the house next door, and the impossibility of love in a time where nothing moves forward. Pushing musical boundaries at every turn, "Please Remain Calm" never loses its feeling of timelessness.

$13.00 - $15.00

Tickets Available at the Door

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The Roc Bar at Brewster's

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Saves The Day with Into It Over It, Hostage Calm

Wednesday, October 2 · Doors 6:30 PM / Show 7:00 PM at The Roc Bar at Brewster's

Tickets Available at the Door