Generationals

Since releasing their debut full-length Con Law in 2009, Generationals have consistently delivered pop hooks shone through a melancholic prism. 2013's Heza brings the band to Polyvinyl and along with the label change, comes a subtle but significant sonic shift.



Recorded in phases at Public Hifi in Austin, producer Daniel Black's Bent Black studio in D.C., and the band's hometown of New Orleans, Heza finds Generationals more satisfied in writing songs that breathe and grow over time. These songs show restraint, with hooks developing in the spaces between sounds. The attention to rhythms and textures reveals a more patient band -- one willing to dig for deeper gems than in their previous work. Tracks like "You Got Me" and "Put a Light On" use minimalist electronic frameworks to match the intensity of more straightforward guitarwork on "Spinoza" and "I Never Know," all of them paying more attention to layers and textures than to forcing the hook. On Heza, Generationals aren't so much shedding their old skin as growing more comfortable in the one they've always inhabited.



Ted Joyner and Grant Widmer struck up a friendship as high school freshmen in New Orleans, LA. While attending Louisiana State in Baton Rouge, the two formed The Eames Era with three classmates in 2003. The dissolution of that group in 2007 led to a return to New Orleans where Joyner and Widmer started writing songs as Generationals. Baton Rouge-native and Eames Era producer Daniel Black (The Oranges Band) invited them to record their debut LP, Con Law, at his Washington, D.C. studio, Bent Black in 2008, where incessant coverage of the presidential campaign between Barack Obama and John McCain, and the issues dividing the candidates' viewpoints, gave rise to the band's name.



New Orleans-based label Park The Van (Dr. Dog, The Spinto Band) released Con Law in 2009. Its retro vibe clearly bore the influence of Phil Spector's mid-century pop, but Generationals' influences always ran the gamut, with pieces of Brit-pop, dance and electronic poking through the trumpet stabs and Abbey Road compression on their analog 24-track recordings.



The band maintained their obsession with tape recording on 2010's Trust EP, produced in Austin, TX by freak- folk mastermind Bill Baird (Sunset, Sound Team). Trust saw the band drift away from the Brill Building origins of Con Law in favor of a new wave sound that owed more to The Sugarcubes and The Stone Roses than the Ronettes. 2011's sophomore LP Actor-Caster revealed a band zeroing in on their strong suit: dynamic pop songwriting. All ten of its taut, bright songs found their way into the band's setlists as they hit their stride with a live confidence earned by relentless touring.



The band's latest endeavor, Heza, brought them to Polyvinyl Records, which will release the album on CD, LP, cassette, and mp3 on April 2, 2013.





"Since releasing their inaugural album, Con Law, back in 2009, Generationals have established themselves as the go-to band for sunny pop songs that display all the catchiness of a Top 40 single without sacrificing a sense of technical playfulness." - Paste



"'Put a Light On' should be liquefied, bottled, and sold at your nearest pharmacy." - NYLON

Boiling up from the independent musical cauldron Hotlanta has become, here comes Gringo Star with its follow up to 2008's critically acclaimed debut,  "All Y'all.  The band now comes into its own with "Count Yer Lucky Stars, " a collection of catchy and instantly classic pop music.  You won't be able to stop humming this spate of new and bright tunes, music that lifts the spirit.  In this Ben Allen (Animal Collective, Gnarls Barkley, Deerhunter) produced record, the surge of primordial forces that reveals itself through rock and roll only about every other generation has infected these multi-instrumentalists and the result is an upbeat album of raw energy and positivity.  Live, if you can resist the urge to dance, you'll find your limbs shaking and your toes tapping to a band which has been described as "explosive," "electrifying," and "exceptional." 

No need for the devices of the main stream musical glitterati who hide lifeless melodies and meaningless lyrics in stage productions and synchronized dancing meant to distract their wide eyed fans; here it's the music itself - honest and intense.  The Gringos, brothers Nicholas and Pete Furgiuele, Pete DeLorenzo and Chris Kaufmann, play each show as if their lives depended on it, and it's that urgency combined with great song writing, pop beats and skilled harmonies that raise Gringo Star above the cacophonous crowd. 

These four guys should be literally showered with the same kind of excited stammering and fawning heaped onto the stars of the early days of rock and roll, the musicians who were raging around the U.S., night after night, putting it all out there, playing their hearts out, singing until they were hoarse and soaked in sweat, letting the music do their talking.  There were once musical movements in this country, but the fracturing and splintering of the music scene stopped new waves from forming and cresting. This is a band which is creating the new standards to usher in the next tsunami.  If you have the chance to catch them in a small venue, you better do it while you still can.

Jonni Greth

Singer/ Songwriter Jonni Greth spent years traveling the Eastern United States-playing music in every town he visited- before arriving in Nashville. His style, which runs the gamut from spooky alt-country to lush, string-heavy Americana, revolves around his earthy fingerpicking style and warm, philanthropic melody lines. Greth draws inspiration from old hymnals, and from songwriting greats such as John Prine, Leonard Cohen, and Bill Mallonee.

At age six, Greth’s father used the family’s tax return money to buy his son a ¾ sized Gremlin acoustic guitar. A childhood hobby grew into a lifestyle as the young songwriter honed his craft at shows around the United States and overseas. His showcases included the Frank Brown International Songwriters Festival in Gulf Shores, Alabama, and Cornerstone Festival in Bushnell, Illinois.

Working the festival and independent folk circuits enabled Greth to connect with many other creative forces, such as bluesman Glenn Kaiser, who he lived with and worked beside for years. He has also collaborated with experimental folk artist Bill Tucker, and jazz singer/songwriter Ami Moss, who have both recorded Greth’s songs. His religious imagery and roughly-hewn lyrics also inspired author Nick May to write his underground novella Megabelt.
“Get his album,” said May, “Maybe you’ll write a book.”

$10.00

Tickets

* General Admission * Standing Room Only- If Seating Is Available, It Will Be On A Strictly First Come/First Serve Basis * Additional $5 Cash Surcharge At The Door For Under 21 * Attendees Under 16 Must Be Accompanied By A Ticketed, Adult Guardian *

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Generationals with Gringo Star, Jonni Greth

Friday, June 28 · Doors 8:00 PM at Vinyl Music Hall