Brazos

Brazos is the recording project of Martin Crane and company. After self-releasing "Phosphorescent Blues" in Austin TX, Martin moved to NY. It's American music based on an acoustic guitar and Martin's free floating vocal delivery. The lyrics are pastoral and influenced by written poetry (Martin set an Adrienne Rich poem to music on the first record). They are the kind of songs that can be played with no accompaniment. Brazos' live show is an intimate but intense power-trio-w-acoustic-guitar. Brazos will release a second album in May on Dead Oceans.

ARMS is what happens when the back burner bursts into flame. A one-time side project transformed into a full band, ARMS synthesizes Todd Goldstein's years of bedroom experimentation and sharpens them into a single bright blade. ARMS' full-band debut, Summer Skills, explodes the lo-fi pop of 2008's Kids Aflame into a widescreen epic, telling a fractured tale of love under supernatural circumstances. Sonically generous and emotionally raw, ARMS' Summer Skills lures listeners like a siren song and then pulls them into the deep.


Todd Goldstein has been writing and recording songs as ARMS since 2004 — although never quite like this. During his years playing guitar in NYC-based indie rockers Harlem Shakes, Todd quietly self-released his own music as ARMS, sneaking home-recording sessions in his rare spare time. Todd's first album as ARMS – the luminous, ramshackle pop of Kids Aflame – was released on Melodic Records (UK) / Gigantic Music (US) in 2008 to enthusiastic Internet-praise. When Harlem Shakes disbanded in the summer of 2009, Goldstein expanded ARMS into a full band with the addition of Tlacael Esparza on drums, Matty Fasano on bass / vocals and David Harrington on keyboards / electronics. The group immediately began writing the songs that would become Summer Skills, holing up with producer Shane Stoneback (Vampire Weekend, Sleigh Bells, Cults, Fucked Up) in Stoneback's Treefort Studios in Brooklyn.


On Summer Skills, ARMS' former emotional directness is abstracted and expanded into something more ambitious and ambiguous: a keenly observed fictional universe that shows more than it tells. With Stoneback behind the boards, drums pop and shimmer, analog synths cast audible shadows and ambient clouds glow on the horizon, rendering ARMS' golden guitar pop something both lovelier and more ominous than before. Todd's unmistakable baritone is the anchor; it swoops and slides into view, veering between vulnerable, seductive and, maybe, a little bit dangerous. The resulting noise calls to mind the atmospheric clarity of British pop experimentalists like Talk Talk or Kate Bush, with a nod to the minimalist melancholy of Red House Painters and the end-over-end urgency of early REM. But ARMS ' noise is all their own, taking the no-nonsense bones of tight songcraft and covering them in shining skin.


Amid the life-or-death stakes of Summer Skills, noses drip kerosene, chill winds blow sweet and razor-sharp teeth gleam in the darkness. It's this terrain of texture and mood, set among the long purple shadows of August afternoons, that underpins the album's sequence of haunting moments — little nightmares lit with the blurry shine of dreams. With Summer Skills, ARMS manages the elusive trick of weaving these threads into something both lush and beautifully, painfully alive. -- Eli Dvorkin

The Relatives

Call it Gospel Funk! In truth, the sound of The Relatives is so much more. Formed in 1970 by veteran Dallas Gospel singer Rev. Gean West and his brother Tommie, The Relatives' sound bridges the gap between traditional Gospel, Soul and Psychedelia. In the early 1970's, they recorded three obscure singles and a previously unreleased session—all of which are compiled on the acclaimed 2009 anthology, Don't Let Me Fall. The release of the anthology brought The Relatives back together as a band, planting the seeds for their 2013 Yep Roc release, The Electric Word, which was recorded and produced by Jim Eno of Spoon.

The Relatives are spawned from the same fervent Pentecostal tradition that begat Elder Utah Smith. In the 1950's and 60's, the West family were Dallas Gospel royalty and often hosted traveling musicians including a young Aretha Franklin, The Staple Singers, Lou Rawls, and O.V. Wright. Rev. Tommie recalls climbing a tree to watch Soul Stirrer Sam Cooke play guitar and sing on their front porch. When Rev. Gean returned home from 1970 tour, a young Tommie had written a song in a new voice influenced as much by traditional Gospel quartets as it was James Brown and Hendrix. "Speak to Me (What's Wrong With America?)" marked the beginning of The Relatives and a new musical direction, dubbed the "Street Sound" by Rev. Gean. The group quickly realized that their contemporary sound would get them bookings in nightclubs as well as churches. As Rev. Gean says, "If the people won't come to church, we'll bring church to the people."

The Relatives spent the 1970's touring nationwide and pressing small batches of 45 rpm singles that did well regionally, but never made a splash outside of North Texas. Known for their powerful original songs and searing stage show, their reputation survived the 1970's, but the group did not, recording their final session with legendary engineer Phil York in 1975 and disbanding in 1980. Rev. Tommie founded his No Walls Ministries, while Rev. Gean continued to manage touring Gospel artists, founded his own church and hosted a popular radio show on Dallas' KKDA, "Soul 73 AM." With only a cracked copy of The Relatives' "Don't Let Me Fall" single to go on, Heavy Light Records located Rev. Gean in 2009 and began the process of reissuing The Relatives' vintage recordings. Rev. Gean calls The Relatives' rediscovery and resurgence, "nothing short of a miracle."

After a stunning, sold-out 2009 reunion performance at the Continental Club in Austin, The Relatives began performing regularly again, barnstorming major festivals and venues worldwide, taking their incredible stage show and four-part harmony to Lincoln Center, ACL Fest, Bonnaroo and Splendour in the Grass. Summer 2011 found the group in southern France, where they appeared at the Cognac Blues Passions festival, collaborating with a 30-member French community choir for an impassioned performance of Relatives originals. 2011 also saw The Relatives combine forces with Garage/Soul powerhouse Black Joe Lewis & the Honeybears to record "You Been Lyin," which appears on the BJL album, Scandalous. Their Austin City Limits TV taping with Black Joe Lewis has been called "one of the best we've ever seen" by longtime ACL staff and fans.

Picking up BJL's drummer and guitarist/musical director as full-time members, The Relatives cut the The Electric Word, their first recording in over 30 years in the summer of 2012. Still helmed by the West brothers, The Relatives' current incarnation is the most powerful generation of this musical family to date.

"The Relatives are the heroes America needs, even if we don't deserve them."
- Dean Blackwood, Revenant Records

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Brazos with Arms, The Relatives, Cooper Formant

Tuesday, April 30 · 8:00 PM at Cameo Gallery

Tickets Available at the Door