The Band Perry

"Daddy rocked us to sleep with the Rolling Stones; Mama woke us up with Loretta Lynn. So we get it honest." - Kimberly Perry


The Band Perry's "modern throwback" style combines classic Country with an eclectic infusion of Rock, Gospel and Soul. As songwriters and musicians, their sound is rounded out by perfect three-part harmonies. The self-titled debut album, THE BAND PERRY, was released in October 2010 by Republic Nashville and one year later was certified Platinum. Their sophomore CD is due out in 2013 and the first single from the new release, “Better Dig Two,” will be released in November.


The Band Perry currently counts a CMA nomination for “Vocal Group of the Year” for the awards which will broadcast on ABC on Thursday November 1st, 2012. Earlier this year the band garnered a Grammy “Best New Artist” nomination and a 2012 ACM “Vocal Group of the Year” nomination among their list of honors. They are the 2011 ACM “New Artist of the Year” as well as the reigning CMA “New Artist of the Year.” They earned the 2011 CMA Award for “Single of the Year” while Kimberly Perry was honored with the 2011 CMA “Song of the Year” award. Other honors include the 2011 CMT Music Award for “Breakthrough Video of the Year,” the "Best New Live Act" Award and another CMT nomination for “Group Video of the Year” as well as TEEN CHOICE, AMA, and ACA award nominations. The Band Perry was also among the nominees for the 2012 Teen Choice Awards for “Choice Country Group.”


Since celebrating a two-week #1 with their Gold-certified single, “All Your Life,” and a Platinum debut album earlier this year, the excitement continues for The Band Perry. The RIAA has certified their #1 smash, “If I Die Young” Quadruple Platinum, for sales exceeding 4 million. The breakout hit is the only single from a debut album in the last 18 months to achieve this status and has sold more copies than any other Country artist in the same timeframe. The band’s single “You Lie” has also been certified GOLD and their most recent single “Postcard From Paris” is a Top 10 hit.


Currently, The Band Perry is performing their own headlining dates and touring as special guests on Brad Paisley's "VIRTUAL REALITY WORLD TOUR 2012." They are also writing and recording their sophomore album, due out later this year.


When talking about The Band Perry, each member of the trio stresses how much family figures into the mix: "Reid, Neil and I share genes and a musical pedigree," Kimberly explains. "We read the same classics and cook from the same recipes. With all of our likenesses though, I believe it's our distinctions that stir up the magic when we create. When the three of us sit down to write songs together, we pull from all of our individual perspectives and happenstances to create the most interesting song concoctions."


"There's a tightness between the three of us that goes way beyond even best friends,"Neil adds. "Family vocal harmonies can't be fabricated. And, besides - the three of us know that through the thick and thin of life and the music business, we're watching after each other."


"Blood runs thick. The music business can be hard, but the three of us are committed not only to our lives in music, but to living them together," Reid says. "I think the security of knowing that about each other allows us to be uninhibited when we create. It's a democracy. It's a safe haven."


"We've walked a long way to find your ears," Kimberly Perry finishes with a grin. "So play us long and play us loud. The Band Perry is here, and we just have so darn much to say."

Easton Corbin knew he wanted to be a country singer well before he learned how to play guitar.


“One of my earliest memories is from when I was three or four,” he remembers. “I was sitting between my parents in the car and a song came on the radio—it was Mel McDaniel’s ‘Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On’. I began using the gearshift as my microphone. The desire has always been there.”


Now those lifelong dreams are coming true. The accolades are continuing to roll in for Easton, who is the first country male artist in 17 years to have his first two consecutive singles reach No. 1 – “A Little More Country Than That” and “Roll With It.”


In a six-month period, he received 13 country music award nominations and won three country music trophies. Most recently, he received three nominations from the Academy of Country Music Awards -- Top New Solo Vocalist as well as Single and Song of the Year for his debut hit, “A Little More Country Than That.”


He won 2010 American Country Awards in every breakthrough artist category – Artist of the Year: Breakthrough Artist, as well as Single of the Year: BreakthroughArtist and Music Video: Breakthrough Artist for “A Little More Country Than That.” He tied with Lady Antebellum to earn the most nominations, garnering seven. In addition, he received nominations for Best New Artist, and Single and Song of the Year for “A Little More Country Than That” at the 2010 Country Music Association Awards.


Billboard named Easton the Top New Country Artist of 2010 and “Roll With It” the No. 6 Hot Country Song of the Year, while “A Little More Country Than That” was ranked No. 19. His album was also named Country Breakthrough Album of the Year by iTunes Rewind.


The Nashville Scene’s 11th annual Country Music Critics’ Poll named Easton the Best New Act of 2010 and included his self-titled album in its Best Albums list at No. 19.


“A Little More Country Than That” was ranked No. 11 on its Best Singles list.


“This is a dream come true,” he says. “This is something I’ve wanted all of my life.


To be able to do this for a living and have people like it, I couldn’t ask for any better. I am so blessed.” Born and raised in rural Gilchrist County, Fla., Easton spent much of his time on his grandparent’s cattle farm after his parents divorced when he was young. “I lived a mile from the Suwannee River,” he says. “I grew up fishing on it and I loved to work on the farm. Every weekend, that’s where I’d be.”


A member of FFA and 4-H, Easton showed cattle at the local livestock fair. Growing up in the smallest county in the state on farmland nestled between two small towns had its advantages. “It’s a close community,” he says. “Everybody knows everybody.


“There’s no Walmart there,” he says. “There was a Hardee’s, but it closed. That was the only franchise fast food place in the county. Trenton has a red light; Bell has a blinking light. It’s a great place.”


While no one in his family played a musical instrument, music was a big part of hiupbringing. “My grandparents liked to watch the Opry,” Easton remembers. “We’d start Saturday night off with ‘Hee Haw’ and then ‘Opry Backstage’ and then ‘Opry Live’.”


It was also at his grandparent’s house that he discovered a record player and his father and aunts’ left-behind records in a front room. “I’d go in there and play those records for hours,” he says.


When Easton was 15 years old he began taking guitar lessons from Pee Wee Melton, a local musician who had at one time played on sessions in Nashville. “He was a great mentor,” Easton says. “He was a great player and a great teacher. He was a really big influence on me.”


Every day when he got home from school, Easton would practice guitar for hours, sometimes until his fingers were raw, then help his grandfather around the farm.


Encouraged by Melton, Easton began playing lead guitar in a local band. “I’d always wanted to play and sing, but up until that time I never really did do it in public,” he says. “We’d play school functions and parties. We were too young to play bars, but we played everything else.”


An impromptu audition at a local music store led to a slot on the Suwannee River Jam, a nearby festival that attracts thousands of people and national touring acts. “It was just me and a guitar in front of a 40-acre field full of people,” Easton remembers. “It was great.”


Soon he was opening for other national acts when they played the area, including Janie Fricke and Mel McDaniel, the man whose song Easton had performed in the car years earlier.


After earning a business degree through the College of Agriculture at the University of Florida, Easton moved to Nashville. “I always knew I wanted to move up here,” he says. “There was never any question about it. I didn’t want to wake up one day and wish I would have tried it, but I had to get my education first so I had something to fall back on.”


Easton, who had been making regular trips to Nashville to perform at writer’s nights, took a day job at a local Ace Hardware. When a distant cousin, also a professor of music management at the University of Montana, heard Easton’s music, he asked if he could send it to some of his Nashville contacts. Among those who were impressed by Easton’s music was booking agent James Yelich, who asked if he could hear him play in person. Easton, eager for a shot to pursue his dream, quickly agreed.


Also at the meeting was Joe Fisher, who had recently joined Universal Music Group Nashville as Senior Director of A&R. The two men were blown away and Fisher quickly signed him to the label.


Easton, whose musical influences include George Jones, Merle Haggard, George Strait and Keith Whitley, found a kindred spirit in producer Carson Chamberlain, who years earlier had toured with Whitley as his steel guitar player and bandleader. “Wereally hit it off,” Easton says. “I love traditional music and he does too. I knew he was the producer for me.”


The two men began working in earnest. “We worked our butts off trying to find the right songs,” Easton says. The result is an over-the-top album that includes cuts from Nashville’s top songwriters, including Mark D. Sanders, Wynn Varble, Tony Lane and David Lee, among others.


Like his heroes Strait and Whitley, Easton is unapologetically country. His songs, while rooted in the present, call to mind simpler times when the back porch was where folks gathered to network. Steel guitars and fiddles are as much a part of his sound as his baritone drawl.


First single, “A Little More Country Than That,” which was written by Rory Feek, Don Poythress and Varble, paints a picture of rural life that speaks to Easton’s small town sensibilities. “Even though I didn’t write it, this song identifies who I am,” he says.


“It shows character and that’s important where I’m from. You learn to say ‘yes, ma’am’ and ‘no, sir,’ and to open the door for the ladies.”


Among the songs included on the album are three Easton co-wrote with Chamberlain and Sanders during a trip to Colorado. “When I came to Nashville I realized how important it was to write songs,” Easton says. “The opportunity to sit in a room with experienced songwriters and learn their craft has helped me become a better writer.


“I’m still working and developing as a writer, but I was fortunate enough to get some songs on the album,” Easton says, perhaps more humble than he needs to be.


“The Way Love Looks,” which Easton co-wrote with Chamberlain and Sanders, is a love song pure and simple. “It’s just a fun upbeat song,” Easton says.


Tony Lane, David Lee and Johnny Park wrote “Roll With It,” which speaks to the important things in life like sunsets and pick-up trucks. “I love that one,” Easton says. “I can imagine listening to it just floatin’ down the river on the boat on aSaturday.”


The tender “I Can’t Love You Back,” written by Chamberlain, Clint Daniels and Jeff Hyde, has a universal message of loss. “It can mean different things for different people,” Easton says. “She could have died, she could have left him—people can interpret it the way they feel.”


Now that his life long dream is upon him, Easton says he’s ready. “I just want to make great country music,” he says. “Just the opportunity to play music for a living is a great thing. I’m just thankful to have the opportunity to do what I’m doing now.”

Honesty is a powerful magnet that always draws an eager audience and it has proven to be a potent tool in Eric Paslay's (Pass-Lay) creative arsenal. Sometimes playful, often poignant and always poetic, the 6' 4" singer/songwriter with the fiery red hair and easy smile has quickly earned a reputation as an artist who radiates integrity. His songs have substance and depth, but his EMI Records Nashville debut album is every bit as entertaining and accessible as it is meaningful, and therein lies Paslay's charm.


From the sly, sexy romp "If the Fish Don't Bite" to the emotionally riveting "Deep As It Is Wide," Paslay proves to be a compelling storyteller and versatile performer. It's a gift he comes by honestly. "My granddad was a musician," says Paslay, a native Texan, who was born in Abilene and raised in Temple. "Granddad and his brothers had a band called Arnold Schiller and the Moonlight Serenaders. My grandfather was Arnold, and they played at dance halls. I was two and a half when he died. It's interesting how he rubbed off on me even though I didn't really know him very well. He had red hair and it's kind of funny because I like all the things he liked."


Paslay says his family never pushed him to play music, but supported his interest when he began playing guitar at 15. "I love melodies. My dad always had oldies on in his '68 Mustang, and listening to that music growing up influenced me. There are so many cool melodies and it was great ear candy."


By the time he began performing around Texas, Paslay had consumed himself with some of the great singer/songwriters and learned how to make a song memorable. "I was influenced by Rich Mullins," Paslay says. "He was one of those guys I really listened to because he was real. He was a Christian artist, but it was cool to hear someone mix their beliefs with real life. He was honest. Then there was Rodney Crowell. I love Rodney Crowell. Johnny Cash has influenced me from his storytelling. He was such a cool storyteller and you really believed him."


Though most aspiring artists playing clubs routinely perform cover tunes, Paslay almost always played his original songs and got enthusiastic response. Even though he was building a reputation for his live shows, like most artists, he briefly flirted with a more stable career and during high school, he planned on becoming a pediatric endocrinologist. "I have juvenile diabetes and I thought I could help kids with diabetes because I could relate to them," he says.


However, music was too strong a passion to be ignored and following a friend's advice, he moved to Nashville. Paslay began attending Middle Tennessee State University, where he became president of MTSU's student chapter of Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI). He recruited top Music Row writers to speak at the university. He also volunteered for anything just to get his foot further in the door and did everything from help out at a charity golf tournament to change light bulbs in the NARAS office, a feat made easier because of his height. "I'd just go help anywhere I could because I thought if you have a job to do and you do it well, then if they let you be creative and make a record, at least they know you're going to do it well," Paslay says. "They'll know you are going to put all your mind, strength and skill into doing whatever job they give you."


He also landed an internship at Cal IV Entertainment. When a tape copy job opened up a month before graduation, Paslay applied only to have his supervisor tell him he was taking his name off the list of contenders. "I thought 'What?!!!' I'd done it for a semester and done a good job," recalls Paslay. "My supervisor said 'I came to Nashville wanting to write songs and I got a job and stopped writing. I don't want to be the guy who makes you stop writing songs.'"


A few months later, Paslay was offered a writer's deal at Cal IV. Even as he continued to develop his chops as an artist, he became one of Music Row's most sought after young songwriters. He co-wrote the hit title track of Jake Owen's new album "Barefoot Blue Jean Night" as well as the title track for Donny and Marie Osmond's country set "The Good Life" and cuts "Friday Night" by Lady Antebellum and "Even If It Breaks Your Heart" by the Eli Young Band.


Though appreciative of the songs that others have recorded, Paslay will be the first to admit he didn't move to Nashville to be a songwriter, but to be an artist. He has a passion for using his voice to connect with an audience, and there's a warm, earnest quality that commands attention whether he's delivering a heartbreaking ballad or an edgy confession.


Though Paslay enjoys recording and has an affinity for the studio, his true love is the stage. "I turn it on when I get on stage. I love to entertain," says Paslay, who has opened for Dierks Bentley, Clint Black, Eric Church, Blake Shelton and Little Big Town, among others. "The songs on this record are the ones that really connect when I played them live. When I write, I like there to be a little bit of hope in every song, even in the sad songs. There's still hope in there. With all the negativity everywhere these days, I'd like the positive to come out. A song can give you a little boost in confidence or make you love stronger and dream deeper."


Most of all, Eric Paslay loves forging that special connection with people that can only be made with a song. "I just love making music. I love how much you can say to someone in a song," he says. "It's great having the opportunity to be a part of the soundtrack of people's lives."

$30.00 - $45.00

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The Band Perry with Easton Corbin, Eric Paslay

Saturday, May 18 · 5:30 PM at Merriweather Post Pavilion