The Tosspints / Hooten Hallers / Rachel Brooke

The Tosspints

Whiskey fueled Irish Punk Rock... Supercharged...

The Tosspints' style of music has been influenced by 3 lifetimes of living through the school of hard knocks, brought to bear from war, loss, degradation, and hard drinking. A band created entirely by a family who has had to make it through life the hard way and use their experience to create songs about the more distressed side of being human. Their fast paced no nonsense stage show drives songs straight into the audience one after the other, pushing their own style of up tempo minor chord melodies out with the highest possible energy level.

Made up of brothers Don Zuzula (guitar, vocals), a combat veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom and younger brother and Zak Zuzula (bass, vocals), a union school teacher, along with drummer John Johnson, they draw from their world experience and working class upbringing in the rust belt city of Saginaw Michigan for their poetically dark yet uptempo songs.

Their powerful stage presence and unending barrage of music from the beginning of their set to the end of the dark, yet high energy show has earned them spots on stage with iconic underground rock heroes such as The Tossers, Murder by death, The Young Dubliners, The Goddamn Gallows, and earned festival showcases from The Michigan Irish Music Festival, the Crispy Music Festival, and the George Killians Irish Red Ruckus as direct support for The Dropkick Murphys. Their songwriting skills have been recognized in the 2011 John Lennon Songwriting Contest where they earned a finalist position and their powerful fan support has earned them a spot on the 2012 Vans Warped Tour Ernie Ball Stage and Alternative Press Magazine Detroit's Band of the Month for December 2012.

The Hooten Hallers

Columbia, MO trio The Hooten Hallers are known for hard-traveling and wild, energetic live shows, criss-crossing their way through North America and Europe with their seemingly endless tour schedule. They continue their decade-long search for their roots, drawing from the surrounding agricultural lifestyles, the river communities, the college kids and the tweakers that roam Columbia, Missouri, all in the looming foothills of the Ozark Mountains.

The myriad of influences in their music range from pre-war blues to punk rock to dark Americana, with a thematic penchant for the strange and the unexplained. In the same vein, the Hooten Hallers’ music isn’t quite Americana and it’s not quite punk, but a bit of both, fused together in a drunken tangle.

The Hooten Hallers’ new self-titled album, out April 21, 2017 on Big Muddy Records, is the culmination of their experiences from 10 years of performing and travelling together. They’ve injected their new album with the stories and characters they’ve been meeting on the road all this time. This combined with hometown pride is key to The Hooten Hallers’ ability to ride the line between DIY punk and American roots music. Produced by Johnny Walker (Soledad Brothers, All Seeing Eyes) and Kristo Baricevic (captain in chief at Big Muddy Records), the Hooten Hallers' latest effort showcases their evolution as musicians and songwriters.

John Randall’s demonically-tinged vocals and blues-inspired, manic guitar, and Andy Rehm's screaming falsetto vocals and steady, pounding drum beat keep the band focused on their unique blend of deep blues and country punk. Kellie Everett brings the power with the deep rumble of her baritone and bass saxophones. When The Hooten Hallers come to town, you know it’s gonna be a party!

Incendiary young country singer and songwriter Rachel Brooke channels the darkest nights of American Southern music, pulling forth influences from raw, early country singing to Chicago blues greats, vintage New Orleans "jass" bands to old animated cartoons (see video below!), all tied together in the framework of her old-fashioned melodies. It takes a peculiar vision to be able to unite these many different sounds, but Brooke's pulled off the most difficult task: she's created a new sound from a pastiche of old music without sounding derivative. Instead her music sounds incredibly fresh, sepia-toned perhaps with the vision of our distant past, but as rough-edged and hand-honed as the best of today's roots music. She's quite the paradox: a young songwriter who perfectly embodies the music of the American South, but who lives in the wilds of Northern Michigan. An artist who grew up with parents in a bluegrass band, but who spent her teen years raging away in an all-girl punk band. A shy, soft-spoken introvert whose wall-shaking voice has earned her a place at cutting-edge roots music festivals like Muddy Roots. An icon of underground country music who covers jazz greats like Fats Domino on her new record. But when you sing this well and play like hell, who do you have to answer to anyways?


“Producing and playing most of the instruments herself, Rachel demonstrates her immense talent and diversity on this album. (Down in the Barnyard 2011) The song writing is top notch, her voice is eerily old-time-authentic, and the whole album has the ability to whisk you away on the country technicolor lullaby head trip that she has painted during it's near-hour long set. Rachel is just hitting her stride, but with this release is proving that we should all be keeping our eyes on her.” –Shooter Jennings, ”- Shooter Jennings - Moonrunners

$8.00 - $10.00

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