SPILLOVER 2013

Ducktails is the one-man psychedelic pop project of Matthew Mondanile, guitarist for North Jersey's Real Estate and more importantly, a proud son of the mid-1980s. At 22 he started releasing his own cassette albums at first living in Northampton, MA. His first 7" came out on Breaking World Records followed by a string of LPs, Cassettes, and CD's on small independent like-minded labels like Not Not Fun, Olde English Spelling Bee, Release the Bats, Arbor, Goaty Tapes etc. Born in Ridgewood, N.J., and now surrounded by a like-minded crew of young songwriters, Matt spends his time either touring or recording in the basement of his parent's house and partying in the city. Categorized by David Keenan as part of the "hypnagogic pop" movement, Ducktails attempts to realize a shared cultural memory and nostalgia through various genres, drone, psych, music concrete, etc. Ducktails III: Arcade Dynamics, Mondanile's third official full-length LP, was released by Woodsist Records in Jan. 2011.

Mondo Generator

The brain of Nick Oliveri is sick. He is crazy and at times psychotic. He is not putting on an act..or trying to be 'bizarre.' Nick is the real deal. It's in the eyes…...

Mondo Generator is the creation of the demented mind of bassist Nick Oliveri. His achievements include:

* Played in KYUSS, from their inception up to Blues for the Red Sun
* Played in the Dwarves under the moniker 'Rex Everything', and had the honor of being kicked out for being 'too fucked up!' Yet, recently has been asked back for some recordings and shows.
* Currently plays bass in the Queens of the Stone Age, and also sings some songs.

The list of players that Nick has assembled for Cocaine Rodeo is a complete who's-who of heavy rock, stoner rock, metal..whatever you wanna call it. Josh Homme (Kyuss, Queens of the Stone Age, Desert Sessions): Plays guitar on many of the tracks. Brant Bjork (Fu Manchu,Kyuss, Desert Sessions): Plays drums on 3 tracks. Rob aka 'Up N Syder' (Karma to Burn): Plays drums on many of the tracks.

In fact, the tracks that feature the lineup of Nick, Josh and Brant (Tracks 1,7,10) are technically the very last Kyuss recordings! They are all written by Nick and (now the clincher!) ARE CURRENTLY PLAYED IN THE QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE LIVE SET!!!!

And if that hasn't sold you, '13th Floor ' (1st track) is also on the Queens of the Stone Age album Rated R released by Interscope Records! Of course, the version here is better!! Definitely raw and much heavier…without the major label gloss.

This is all fine and good, but what the hell does Mondo Generator sound like? Well, given the lineup, it's obviously brutal and punishing! Reference points are: Kyuss, Neurosis, Jesus Lizard, the Dwarves, and the Dead Boys. Very aggressive, very loud, very heavy!

Ducktails is the one-man psychedelic pop project of Matthew Mondanile, guitarist for North Jersey's Real Estate and more importantly, a proud son of the mid-1980s. At 22 he started releasing his own cassette albums at first living in Northampton, MA. His first 7" came out on Breaking World Records followed by a string of LPs, Cassettes, and CD's on small independent like-minded labels like Not Not Fun, Olde English Spelling Bee, Release the Bats, Arbor, Goaty Tapes etc. Born in Ridgewood, N.J., and now surrounded by a like-minded crew of young songwriters, Matt spends his time either touring or recording in the basement of his parent's house and partying in the city. Categorized by David Keenan as part of the "hypnagogic pop" movement, Ducktails attempts to realize a shared cultural memory and nostalgia through various genres, drone, psych, music concrete, etc. Ducktails III: Arcade Dynamics, Mondanile's third official full-length LP, was released by Woodsist Records in Jan. 2011.

The often amorous, and occasionally frightening NOBUNNY (one word, all caps) has been captivating audiences of dedicated fans and new believers since Easter 2001 (the day Joey Ramone died). Born in the desert outside of Tucson AZ, Nobunny started as an animal Elvis impersonator before deciding to try out his hand at songwriting. The raucous rabbit's music is a intoxicating concoction of all the ri
ghts and wrongs that make up the heart and the soul of real rock n roll. Songs that sound as though they were written at the Brill building by a punk rock mutant back from the future. Some batshit brilliant bullshit.

NOBUNNY stayed deep underground for his first 6 years doing DIY solo tours, burning limited CDRs, and building a dedicated group of fans across the USA. NOBUNNY shows were purported to include a dizzying act that often featured nudity, dancing, chaos, and costumes (most notably NOBUNNY's filthy rabbit mask).

In 2008 NOBUNNY released his first LP titled "Love Visions" on 1234GO! Records. The album was a hit among critics, punks, and nerds alike. A modern RNR classic filled with inept production, and songs as catchy as herpes. In 2009 Burger Records released the Mixtape/LP "Raw Romance". An acoustical confessional brainstorm exploration of cassette goodness . In 2010 the rascally rabbit released a "warts n all" Live Album on Jack White's Third Man Records. The year ended with Nobunny's 2nd proper LP, "FIRST BLOOD". Released on the Memphis' Goner Records, the album is NOBUNNY's off the deep end, poptastic, psych-o masterstroke.

NOBUNNY has spent most of the last 4 years touring North America, with 3 trips to Europe to boot. A licentiousness, lascivious, bon vivant who shows no signs slowing or toning it down. NOBUNNY loves you, and has made it damn near impossible not to love him back. Follow the white rabbit!

-WiLLiam Burros 2011

Young Widows

Louisville, KY's Young Widows have progressed from their noisy hardcore roots into something truly their own - a sinister, hypnotic rock band with a mind-blowing live show and a stunning attention to detail. With their bone-rattling rhythms and their sprawling wall of matching custom-designed amps, Young Widows kill the fashionably bored and resurrect the evil dead.

Mondo Generator

The brain of Nick Oliveri is sick. He is crazy and at times psychotic. He is not putting on an act..or trying to be 'bizarre.' Nick is the real deal. It's in the eyes…...

Mondo Generator is the creation of the demented mind of bassist Nick Oliveri. His achievements include:

* Played in KYUSS, from their inception up to Blues for the Red Sun
* Played in the Dwarves under the moniker 'Rex Everything', and had the honor of being kicked out for being 'too fucked up!' Yet, recently has been asked back for some recordings and shows.
* Currently plays bass in the Queens of the Stone Age, and also sings some songs.

The list of players that Nick has assembled for Cocaine Rodeo is a complete who's-who of heavy rock, stoner rock, metal..whatever you wanna call it. Josh Homme (Kyuss, Queens of the Stone Age, Desert Sessions): Plays guitar on many of the tracks. Brant Bjork (Fu Manchu,Kyuss, Desert Sessions): Plays drums on 3 tracks. Rob aka 'Up N Syder' (Karma to Burn): Plays drums on many of the tracks.

In fact, the tracks that feature the lineup of Nick, Josh and Brant (Tracks 1,7,10) are technically the very last Kyuss recordings! They are all written by Nick and (now the clincher!) ARE CURRENTLY PLAYED IN THE QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE LIVE SET!!!!

And if that hasn't sold you, '13th Floor ' (1st track) is also on the Queens of the Stone Age album Rated R released by Interscope Records! Of course, the version here is better!! Definitely raw and much heavier…without the major label gloss.

This is all fine and good, but what the hell does Mondo Generator sound like? Well, given the lineup, it's obviously brutal and punishing! Reference points are: Kyuss, Neurosis, Jesus Lizard, the Dwarves, and the Dead Boys. Very aggressive, very loud, very heavy!

Zechs Marquise

Zechs Marquise formed in El Paso, Texas during the spring of 2003 when brothers Marfred and Marcel Rodriguez-Lopez came together with childhood friends Matthew Wilkson and Marcos Smith. The group soon named itself after a popular Japanese anime character and hit the studio to record its first album during the late summer months of 2004. That studio effort was later scrapped and in June 2006 the band instead released 34:26, a live improved set that showed its great range of talents and influences. By fall of 2006, Zechs was touring the west coast consistently, sharing the stage with such eclectic acts as Daedelus, Busdriver, The Album Leaf, (DJ) Nobody, Daddy Kev, The Gaslamp Killer, and Totimoshi. July 2007 saw the band return to the recording studio. Having learned from the difficulties of their first attempt, the quintet decided to keep all of the recording in house, purchasing a mixing board, microphones, and Pro Tools in order to track all of the recordings themselves. After a few days in their studios, dubbed Castle Greyskull and El Morro, the members realized they had enough material for a full length album. The record, Our Delicate Stranded Nightmare, was completed in February 2008. Zechs Marquise then spent time on the road, auspiciously touring with Free Moral Agents & Blank Blue. In March 2009, the band made its first adventure overseas to Europe, opening for the Omar Rodriguez-Lopez Group, in which Marcel — then performing double duty — is also a player. During the overseas tour, Our Delicate Stranded Nightmare was released in Europe by RLP/Willie Anderson Recordings on CD as well as the first pressing of the album on vinyl. In May 2009, Zechs Marquise signed on to the prestigious management roster at Sargent House and will release Our Delicate Stranded Nightmare in the U.S. on vinyl and CD on August 25th through Rodriguez Lopez Productions.

The Coathangers

Be leery of any punk band with initial ambitions that go beyond just playing shows with their friends. Sure, great bands ascend beyond basements and handmade demos all the time, but the best acts start with little consideration for the outside world. The groups are their own insular worlds, where the reward comes from the process, not accolades and riches. And the bands that thrive on their own artistic satisfaction usually wind up being the bands that are able to grow beyond the donation jar into sustainable successful musical careers. Their charisma is contagious, their songs exist outside of fads, and their spirits can weather the inevitable ups and downs of life as touring musicians. Such is the case with the Atlanta trio The Coathangers.
When The Coathangers started up in 2006, their aspirations were humble. “I think all bands in their early twenties start for fun,” says guitarist/vocalist Julia Kugel when talking about their early years of cheeky no-wave and irreverent garage rock. But Julia and her bandmates Meredith Franco (bass/vocals) and Stephanie Luke (drums/vocals) were serious about their craft, and that combination of modest outside expectations and absolute dedication to their music made for exhilarating live shows and contagious records. Ten years later, The Coathangers are still going strong, and while their palette has expanded over the years to touch upon hip-shakin’ classic rock, soulful country ballads, and golden oldies pop, their primary attack strategy still relies heavily on the jagged hooks and boisterous choruses of their formative years. Their fifth album Nosebleed Weekend retains all the devil-may-care magnetism and serrated instrumentation of their debut, but it flourishes with a decade’s worth of songwriting discipline and chemistry.
Nosebleed Weekend kicks off with “Perfume”, a song that marries sultry pop vocals with toothy guitar riffs in a manner that would make Ann and Nancy Wilson proud. It’s hard to imagine The Coathangers writing a song this accessible in their early years, but in 2016 it fits perfectly into their canon. From there the band launches into “Dumb Baby”, which harkens back to the gritty neo-garage rock of Murder City Devils. Longtime fans who still clamor for their brash post-punk angle will be immediately satiated by “Squeeki Tiki”. And after hearing the noisy loud-quiet-loud bombast of “Excuse Me?” it’s no wonder that Kim Gordon has become an outspoken fan of the band. It’s an eclectic album inspired by life on the road, lost loved ones, and Kugel’s recent move to Southern California. “We always say that each record is a snapshot of our life at the time,” Kugel says. “As far as style… it’s just what came out of us at that point.” So whether it’s the foreboding garage rock of the title track, the post-punk groove of “Burn Me”, the stripped-down pop of “I Don’t Think So”, or the dynamic grunge of “Down Down”, The Coathangers command their songs with passion and authority.
The biggest departure for Nosebleed Weekend was the recording process. While all their previous albums were recorded in Atlanta at The Living Room with Ed Rawls, their latest album found the band out in California’s North Hollywood at Valentine Recording Studios with Nic Jodoin. “The Beach Boys and Bing Crosby both recorded there!” Kugel says excitedly. “It was an amazing experience, not to mention a ghostly one too. The studio had been custom built by Jimmy Valentine and he was very protective of his passion. It sounds weird, but his spirit was there, checking in on us and fucking with us a bit.” Nosebleed Weekend was the first session at Valentine Recording Studios since Jimmy’s professional interests were diverted elsewhere in 1979. The studio doors were shut, capturing a time capsule of the LA music industry back in the ‘70s. Thinking back to the early years of The Coathangers, it’s hard to imagine the scrappy Southern ladies ever recording in a historic studio in the San Fernando Valley, but it’s a classic demonstration of what can happen when humble young punks stick to their guns.

Parenthetical Girls

Parenthetical Girls are a band. Of sorts. Beginning as a home recording project of little consequence in the failed milltown of Everett, Washington, the seeds of the band were initially conceived on the eve of 2002 between two childhood friends, Jeremy Cooper and Zac Pennington. Compiling an innocent assortment of equipment (bass synthesizer, ill-tuned guitar, analog tape delay, and, of course, glockenspiel), the pair embarked on a hopelessly flawed trajectory--to emulate the spirit of their mutual musical interests, which at the time primarily included the likes of Brian Eno, Pete Kember, Phil Spector, and the early Rough Trade catalog. The result was a less-than-subtle amalgam of Spectorian reverence, oblique strategy, teenage angst, opiated reverb, and saccharine-pop sensibilities--songs that are scarely songs at all. That band existed in a variety of forms until the winter of 2002, quietly dissolving with a mutual disinterest in the strains of practice and artistic indifference.

A year or so later, Zac decided to re-evaluate the hiss-laden Maxell he and Jeremy had casually lost interest in so many months before, and, in spite of its obvious limitations, took it upon himself to "finish" what the twosome had started. Rooting through hundreds of unlabelled cassette tapes in Jeremy's dank, rented storage facility in Everett, Zac finally unearthed the original 8-track recordings--and with the help of considerably more capable hands (namely the Dead Science's Jherek Bischoff and Xiu Xiu's Jamie Stewart) the original recordings were digitally (and heavily) retrofitted into seven proper compositions. To further complicate matters, Pennington commissioned Jherek and Jamie to complete two radically different sets of mixes for the songs--which have since become respectively known as the "O" and "X" versions of the record. For the sake of Zac's wavering spine, "Swastika Girls" had by this time arbitrarily become "Parenthetical Girls"--and were by this point quite a different beast anyway. That record became (((GRRRLS))), and was issued on the Slender Means Society label in 2004 in vinyl only format--later expanded and reissued on CD in 2006. Scant touring followed--first as a trio consisting of Zac, Jherek, and Jherek's Dead Science band mate Sam Mickens, and later as a duo sans-Bischoff--playing shows with the kindly likes of Xiu Xiu, Deerhoof, The Microphones, Casiotone For the Painfully Alone, and, of course, The Dead Science. Before we knew it, some two years had past, and we had shockingly little to show for it.

Beginning sometime in 2005, Zac undertook a new Parenthetical Girls recording project, which by the end of the year would become Safe As Houses, the band's sophomore record. Written and recorded with Jherek and Sam in the usual closets, apartments, boat houses, and art galleries between Portland, OR and Everett, WA, Safe As Houses was finished after Christmas, 2005, and released in the Summer of 2006. People seemed to like that one a lot more than the first one. The band--now comprised of proper members Matthew Carlson, Eddy Crichton, Rachael Jensen, and Zac--toured the United States a lot after that, and then undertook our first European tour, which including festivals and shows with Patrick Wolf, Smashing Pumpkins, Deerhoof, White Stripes, and a battle set vs. Slint performing Spiderland in its entirety. We lost.

Upon our return, the band began work on their third album, entitled Entanglements. In spite of the fact that nearly every song features upwards of 100 tracks, Zac scarcely played anything on the record. Which pleases him greatly. We all hope it comes out sometime this year. Or ever.

Jaill is a lot like other bands; they've slept on your floor, you've made fun of their pillow cases, they're not nearly as good at Excitebike as they said they were and although they all say they're cool with cats, no one's excited about sleeping at the cat house. So it should come as no surprise that, as bands sometimes do, they've made a new record. And that record is Traps, their second for Sub Pop, but first to adopt the bold new marketing strategy of giving away a free pair of Nike cross-trainers to anyone who steals it on the internet. Take that, Radiohead. So, but, what is Traps? And what about it can best fill five paragraphs? Traps is pretty, it's moody, it pops. It has the scrappy, vengeful enthusiasm of a puppy stuck under a blanket. It's an adorably grumpy bear just awoken from his long winter's slumber, with a mangy heart rarely found outside of the stuffed animal bin of a Salvation Army. It's an album that expects to be taken seriously goddammit, even though it just puked on the bar.

Alex Bleeker and the Freaks

"Alex Bleeker and the Freaks is a loving collection of classic rock and roll tunes. Over Budweiser's in the Maxwell's dining room before the show Bleeker mentioned he wants his band to sound like Neil Young and Crazy Horse. You can definitely feel that desire coming though on the record and in live settings. The music has a rough edge to it, a kind of electric haze that makes pretty sounds feel more desperate." - Microphone Memory Emotion

To say that Widowspeak is a Northwest band is to tell a half-truth. After all they formed in a Brooklyn apartment thousands of miles to the east, and their guitarist has never even seen the Pacific Ocean. There are aspects of the band's sound—abrasive guitar hooks, immediate drumming, and incessant codas—that speak to living in a big city. But there's also a dreary sparseness, a David Lynch-esque darkness, culled from the other members' native Washington.
Singer/songwriter Molly Hamilton grew up in an old house in Tacoma, drummer Michael Stasiak in nearby Lakewood. While grunge put Seattle on the map and Riot Grrl and the DIY aesthetic are synonymous with Olympia, Tacoma remains grittier, darker even. Infamous for the acrid smell of its paper mills, this blue-collar city somehow fosters a fertile music community—if few outsiders know about it. Michael and Molly first crossed paths in that tight-knit scene, both contributing to a local compilation label. The label lasted all of one summer before half its roster decamped for New York.
There, three summers later, Michael approached Molly about starting a new band. Molly's crippling stage fright and inexperience with the electric guitar seemed good excuses to decline, but at Michael's urging she bought a used Danelectro and put pen to paper. Soon after, Michael invited guitarist Robert Earl Thomas to a tentative first practice. Though Robert had to plug his guitar into the stereo, and Michael played only two drums, something was palpable in that first hour. They chose a name Molly had picked months before, and Widowspeak was born.
The band's skeletal sound began to take shape, with Robert's rust-belt guitar parts lending a restless, sinister edge to Molly's subdued melodies and soft vocal style. Writing became a collaborative effort, and Widowspeak racked up an arsenal of songs. By fall the trio had recorded a six-track cassette using only a built-in laptop microphone and Garageband. The self-released October Tape, as it was called, fell into the hands of Brooklyn's Captured Tracks. Weeks later, after only their sixth show, Widowspeak recorded the 7" single, "Harsh Realm," in anticipation of a full LP.
That album, recorded at Rear House with Jarvis Taveniere of Woods, documents Widowspeak's inaugural year. In a relaxed studio setting songs born from those first jittery practices could breathe. The trio expanded their modest instrumentation while retaining a sparse aesthetic. The resulting record offers an eerie ambience, at times channeling 1950's jukebox pop, at others, 1960's psychedelia. While garnering comparisons to slow-moving 1990's acts such as Mazzy Star or Cat Power, Widowspeak have defined a sound that's earnestly nostalgic, and increasingly confident. Even so, these are songs about heartache. They are songs about homesickness, about longing for pine forests, reckless youth, and dark nights in strange cities.

Black Tusk is an American sludge metal band from Savannah, Georgia. The band was formed in 2005, when its members were all living on the same street. With the dissolution of Andrew Fidler (guitar, vocals) and Jonathan Athon (bass, vocals) crust punk band and James May (drums, vocals) street punk band, Andrew and Athon went down the street to James' house and asked him if he wanted to play with them. During the next few days they jammed continuously, and within a few months they had recorded the EP When Kingdoms Fall, which was released on Wrecked Signal. Two years later the band self-released their first full-length studio album, The Fallen Kingdom, followed by another a year later with Passage Through Purgatory, released through the local label Hyperrealist Records. In 2009, Black Tusk released a series of split albums with bands such as ASG, The Holy Mountain, and Fight Amp, before signing to relapse records in November. The band released its debut for Relapse, Taste The Sin, in May 2010. They released their third album, Set the Dial, in October 2011 through Relapse Records.

Black Tusk is mostly associated with Baroness and Kylesa, for their shared hometown of Savannah, as well as for their sludge metal sound. The band is linked to Baroness' guitarist and vocalist John Dyer Baizley, who is also a painter and creates all of Black Tusk's artwork. Black Tusk's members describe their music as "swamp metal," a term that has been described by Allmusic as "the murkiest, dirtiest sludge to come out of Savannah since Kylesa".

White Mystery

White Mystery rocks a Top Ten Album, ELLE Magazine Brazil feature, Daytrotter session, POWERGLOVE music video, and Sound Opinions episode distributed by American Public Media.
Miss Alex White and Francis White are two siblings born and raised in the city of Chicago that play original, garage punk shows around the world.
Chicago Tribune music editor and Sound Opinions host Greg Kot writes,
"The real attraction is White Mystery, the new duo forged by Miss Alex White, best known as the guitar-wielding blowtorch in her long-running gig with [Miss Alex White and] the Red Orchestra. With drummer Francis White, she reduces her love of soul-fired garage rock to its butt-kicking essence."

The Orwells

"I'm not that old but I'm getting pretty wise" -- a sentiment within the early seconds of The Orwells' new album, Disgraceland, that pretty much sums up the eleven tracks that follow it. Two years have passed since the band emerged from their boring Chicago suburb as five high schoolers hellbent on reminding the world that American rock & roll is still alive. A lot has happened since then for The Orwells. They've slain and sweated on audiences around the world, recorded with their favorite contemporary producers, shared the stage with childhood heroes, raked in accolades from distinguished publications and even had David Letterman begging them for more. And now, as they release their irresistibly raucous yet masterfully architected Disgraceland on Canvasback Music, The Orwells are getting pretty wise.
The story of Disgraceland -- recorded last fall at studios in London, Chicago, New York, Los Angeles and Woodstock, NY -- is the story of The Orwells escaping the confines of their hometown and of their own expectations for themselves. Back when they made their 2012 debut album, Remember When, they were recording by themselves in guitarist Matt O'Keefe's parents' basement. O'Keefe, bassist Grant Brinner, his brother, drummer Henry Brinner, guitarist Dominic Corso and his cousin, singer Mario Cuomo, had been playing together since 9th grade. "We were hoping eventually something would happen and it would become serious," says O'Keefe. "We were like, 'We love writing songs, so let's just keep doing it.' When we were writing those early songs, the goal was just to make all the other bands in our high school jealous." Maybe one day, they thought, they'd get to be as beloved as their heroes The Black Lips. "You make good music, say what you wanna say and have a good time -- that was what we were shooting for," O'Keefe continues. "But now that we're a little older, the goal is bringing rock & roll back to everybody's car speakers. Sometimes you get afraid to go to the highest point you can, at the price of being called sell-outs or whatever. But we say fuck that, if we can get every single kid playing rock and roll music in their parents' car stereos, that's what we wanna do."
Though they eventually teamed with producers Dave Sitek (Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Santigold, TV On the Radio), Chris Coady (Smith Westerns, Beach House) and Jim Abbiss (Arctic Monkeys), they started writing the new album before the first one was even released. "We were still in high school when we wrote the early songs for this album," says O'Keefe. "So we expected that we would be handing the first few songs we were making out on a CD to kids in the hallways, just like we had before. But as time went on and we got signed to Canvasback, we figured this might be the last album we write while still living in Elmhurst. We wanted to capture what the last 18-20 years of our lives were like, in this anywhere USA suburb." Songs like "Dirty Sheets," "Southern Comfort" and "Let It Burn" detail debauched nights, sloppy hook-ups and the kind of trouble you let yourself get into when you're bored, broke and barely legal.
Recorded in Los Angeles with Sitek last summer, "Who Needs You?" was actually written back in October 2011. Says O'Keefe: "It was the day Obama announced we'd be pulling all of the troops out of Iraq, and we thought, 'let's write a kind of 60's Vietnam thing' celebrating these kids coming home. As it developed, in my basement writing it, the song became more like, 'it's fucked up that we were there in the first place,' and it was basically a bunch of ignorant teenagers trying to comment on something political." Released as a single last fall, the tune earned praise from the Chicago Sun-Times, which described it as "ring[ing] with big, chiming guitars, a giant stomping beat straight out of Motown and Cuomo, bellowing societal disgust through a microphone that sounds like it is plugged into a muddy lake bottom: 'You better save the country/you better pass the flask/you better join the army/I say no thank you dear old Uncle Sam!'"
Cuomo says that songs like the Jim Abbiss-produced "Dirty Sheets" and album-closer "North Ave" are "pretty autobiographical," detailing "feelings bundled up from high school shit." Writing about those experiences, he says, is his way of burying them. The rest of The Orwells -- all a year younger than the singer -- had been playing together for awhile when they finally got Cuomo to join them. "Mario was always that kid all of us knew about," says Grant. "Not just because he was cousins with Dominic, either. He was that one dude a grade above us who would flick off a teacher or that kind of thing. You'd always hear stories about something crazy that Mario had done. He was definitely that kid everyone knew about and either hated or loved."
Up until that point, Cuomo had been singing along to CDs in his room, "trying to hit notes and shit." He cites frontmen like Glenn Danzig and Odd Future's Tyler, The Creator, as inspiration, as well as Iggy Pop's menacing, self-destructive presence. Though The Orwells' live show has become the stuff of legend in the past year, inspiring Consequence Of Sound to write, "frontman Mario Cuomo has tapped into something special, carnal, and almost evil," Cuomo admits that it took him a minute to unleash his own inner wildman on stage: "I was super uncomfortable just standing there and it made me feel really bad and not satisfied with shows, using a mike stand and being boring," he says. "Little by little as I started moving around more, it started feeling better. It took maybe 50 shows to really get it down and get super comfortable and know what I was doing. I still don't know but kind of."
Doing whatever comes naturally seems to be paying off for The Orwells. Their television appearances on Later With Jools Holland and The Late Show With David Letterman in the past year gave audiences around the world a taste of what concertgoers have seen during the band's recent tours with Arctic Monkeys, FIDLAR and Palma Violets. Footage of the performances instantly made the rounds. "I thought we did it right," says Cuomo. "I fucked up a bunch, but in retrospect, it's how rock music should be played: No matter what venue and where you are and who you're playing for, it's not going to be perfect. Even if you're on TV, it's ok to fuck it up sometimes."
"The Orwells tap into [a] primal energy… in which youthful abandon and sloppiness are touchstones — and know their way around a nuttily repetitive hook." – SPIN
"The best new live band in America" – NME
"...a mixture of back-breaking intensity, youthful tomfoolery and the utterly unhinged... With their brattish sensibility and near endless displays of energy, The Orwells seem to tap into that perennial youthful outcast in all of us – the kid who is forever being dragged to detention on reputation alone." –Clash Music

Parquet Courts

Little was said about Parquet Courts debut effort, American Specialties. Released exclusively on cassette tape, the quasi-album was an odd collection of 4 track recordings that left those who were paying attention wanting more. A year of woodshedding live sets passed before the Courts committed another song to tape. The band's first proper LP, Light Up Gold, is a dynamic and diverse foray into the back alleys of the American DIY underground. Bright guitars swirl serpentine over looping, groovy post-punk bass lines and drums that border on robotic precision. While the initial rawness of the band's early output remains, the songwriting has gracefully evolved. Primary wordsmiths A. Savage and Austin Brown combine for a dynamic lyrical experience, one part an erudite overflow of ideas, the other an exercise in laid-back observation. Lyrically dense, the poetry is in how it flows along with the melody, often times as locked-in as the rhythm section.



"This record is for the over-socialized victims of the 1990's 'you can be anything you want', Nickelodeon-induced lethargy that ran away from home not out of any wide-eyed big city daydream, but just out of a subconscious return to America's scandalous origin," writes Savage in the album's scratched-out liner notes. Recorded over a few days in an ice-box practice space, Light Up Gold is equally indebted to Krautrock, The Fall, and a slew of contemporaries like Tyvek and Eddy Current Suppression Ring.



Though made up of Texan transplants, Parquet Courts are a New York band. Throw out the countless shallow Brooklyn bands of the blase 2000's: Light Up Gold is a conscious effort to draw from the rich culture of the city - the bands like Sonic Youth, Bob Dylan, and the Velvet Underground that are not from New York, but of it. A panoramic landscape of dilapidated corner-stores and crowded apartments is superimposed over bare-bones Americana, leaving little room for romance or sentiment. It's punk, it's American, it's New York ... it's the color of something you were looking for.

Today is the Day

Led by "charismatic cult leader" Steve Austin, Today Is The Day is
renowned as one of the most unique and influential bands of the past
15 years. Austin's iconic presence and fearless brand of metal,
noise, psychedelia, and rock have earned the band worldwide acclaim.

Today Is The Day has toured the world with the likes of Motorhead,
Melvins, Morbid Angel, Converge, Napalm Death, and Neurosis and has
released eight studio albums on labels including Amphetamine Reptile,
Relapse, and SuperNova. Ex-members of Today Is The Day include Brann
Dailor and Bill Kelliher of Mastodon. As a producer, Steve Austin has
recorded albums by Lamb Of God, Converge, Deadguy, and many more.

The New York Times has hailed Today Is The Day with the following
description: "Proud noisemakers for 15 years now, Today Is The Day
starts with brutal blues-rock and completely disfigures it with sheets
of distortion and the bestial ravings of Steve Austin."

Alternative Press Magazine has offered this praise: "Today Is The Day
founder Steve Austin has functioned as a cultish Robert Fripp/John
McLaughlin hybrid; a noise-rock auteur known as much for his
off-kilter, damaging riffs and vocals as for his soaring David Gilmour
leads."

The live Today Is The Day line-up consists of frontman Steve Austin, bassist Ryan Jones
(Wetnurse) and drummer Curran Reynolds (Wetnurse).

Single Mothers

Blasted grassland, the thin ribbon line of the freeway
unspooling beneath wheels, skies stretched wide
between mountaintop. It is dream music, foggy,
atmospheric, the melodies you hear while you gazing
out through fingerprint smeared windows into a
constantly moving, metamorphing - landscape….
It makes sense then, that BRONCHO, born out of out a
film project, its initial incarnation sparked when
founder Ryan Lindsey was asked to create music, “to
set to an early 80s punk film.” “That’s all I knew about
it,” he remembers, “they were looking for songs that
touched this era. And songs kept coming to me and
turned something on inside of me artistically.” Lindsey
found himself in the midst of prolific run of songs and
he liked the idea “of starting out there and seeing
where it could go.”
What’s evolved from those first tracks there has been a
steady run of success, critical accolades and two fulllength
albums; 2011’s Can't Get Past the Lips,
2014’s Just Enough Hip to Be Woman. And beneath it all
– the music has been constantly mutating and
ceaselessly experimental. From that first inception as a
soundtrack in 2010, BRONCHO has taken on a life of its'
own – initial inspiration still there, but now pushing far
beyond the stiff confines of score. And what began as
an ode to ramshackle, high-energy early punk has
become something deeper, weirder, and much more
nuanced. The undercurrent of early 1980 punk is still
there, but The Ramones pogo has been replaced more
often by a kind of Love and Rockets inspired, honeyed,
cotton-mouthed drift.
Double Vanity is Lindsey and band mates Ben King,
Nathan Price and Penny Pitchlynn steadily moving
ahead, transforming the raw angst of the first record
into a sound decidedly more layered and
complex. Tracks like “New Karma" or “Two Step" riff off
the later explorations of punk, culling up refracted
images of John Hughes prom nights, love songs echoing
from a boom box held high. "Jenny Loves Jenae" and
"Speed Demon" strut with an when 80s met 50s swagger,
discord transformed into a jagged, frenetic pop.
"Señora Borealis" is all bad boy sneer - sensual, moody,
with a sly and predatory swagger. "I Know You" is
simultaneously infectious and brooding, somehow both
exalting and heartsick.
The result is a record that veers gleefully from
BRONCHO’s roots, moving from graffiti spray backrooms
into a sleeker, plusher sound, a place bright with the
polished gleam of chrome and bleached white
sunlight. Close your eyes and what you feel is the raw
wound pulse of adolescence, what you see behind your
lids is suburban shopping mall wastelands, glazed eyes,
dead grass, lips glossed in bubblegum pink. There is the
burst chest thump of teenage longing, the smell of
hairspray and cigarette. There is glow of neon and the
glint of streetlight rolling across hood.
Double Vanity evokes a shared nostalgia, for the past
and for the unknown future, as BRONCHO takes a turn
off the wide freeways and into a world of intimate,
intricate - but always universal - emotion.

Baring Teeth

Progressive Death Metal trio from Dallas, TX

The Birds of Night

Full of Hell

A seamless mixture of hardcore, noise, and death metal. Not only has the young band proven that they have the musical chops to keep up with older members of the DIY scene through several releases, but their live performances are always memorable and reveal an unparalleled intensity. Ocean City, MD

Pallbearer is a metal band from Central Arkansas, formed in 2008 after spending time playing in various bands around the Little Rock underground metal scene. Paying homage to doom metal of old while still looking wholly forward, the band built upon the underground success of their initial demo offering in 2010 and their debut full length "Sorrow and Extinction" was released in February, 2012 to virtually universal critical acclaim. Now the band slowly marches onward to deliver its progressively-tinged beautiful gloom on a global scale.

KEN mode (an acronym for Kill Everyone Now) is a Canadian metallic hardcore-influenced noise rock band from Winnipeg, Manitoba that was formed in September 1999.

Formed by brothers Jesse (guitar/vocals) and Shane Matthewson (drums) and long-time friend Darryl Laxdal (bass), the group released several demos from 1999 to 2003, leading to the release of their debut full length Mongrel on Escape Artist Records.[2][3]
Several tours followed with the likes of Relapse Records' The End ,[4] Sulaco and American Heritage [5] in addition to regional dates with Mastodon, Burnt By The Sun, Anodyne, Pelican, Harkonen, Breather Resist, The Dream is Dead, Psyopus, Daughters, and Buried Inside across the Midwestern and East Coast United States, and throughout Canada. In 2004 Laxdal left the band,[6] only to rejoin in 2005 to finish the band's follow-up record Reprisal, released in 2006 on CD by Escape Artist Records, and on double-LP by No List Records. After the recording of Reprisal Laxdal and the band parted ways again.[7] Picking up bass duties after Laxdal's departure was Drew Johnston (guitarist in Electro Quarterstaff)[8][9] who also played with Jesse, Shane and Darryl in Hide Your Daughters.
In October 2006 the band took part in the "Exclaim! Magazine Aggressive Tendencies Tour" with Pelican and Daughters across Canada.[10] Bass duties were handled by former Kittens and Projektor member Jahmeel Russell who played with Jesse, Shane and Drew in Hide Your Daughters.[11]
KEN mode went on to work with Jahmeel for the band's third full-length, Mennonite, which was released in July 2008[12] on CD by Jesse Matthewson's own label, Arctodus Records, and on 3x7" vinyl by No List Records.
Prior to releasing Mennonite, Chad Tremblay joined the band as their fourth bassist in two years. The band embarked on a European tour with Welsh rockers Taint.[13] Chad would go on to direct the bands debut music video for the song "Extending Common Courtesy Throughout The Evening" from their Mennonite album.[citation needed]
In 2010 the band announced that Profound Lore Records will release its fourth full length album, titled Venerable, to be recorded August 2010 with Kurt Ballou of Converge. They also announced several North American tours with Gaza, Engineer, Rosetta, Buried Inside, Wolvhammer, Clinging To The Trees Of A Forest Fire, and others.[14]

Howl

Providence, Rhode Island's HOWL ushers in a new age of iron and steel with their Relapse debut Full of Hell. Wave after wave of the quartet's devastating riffs pound hard as tracks 'Horns of Steel,' 'Jezebel,' 'The Scorpion's Last Sting' and the insidious crawl of 'Heavenless' make clear. Full of Hell rocks hard and heavy, and is as unrelenting as the title implies. Recommended if you like: MASTODON, BOLT THOWER, ENTOMBED, KINGDOM OF SORROW, BARONESS, CROWBAR, KYLESA, DOWN, TORCHE, MELVINS, COALESCE

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